Week of April 8

Monday, April 8
SAILING ALONE AROUND THE WORLD
In 1895 a retired Canadian sea captain set off to sail alone around the world. It had never been done, and it took Joshua Slocum three years, but the book of his adventures made him famous. Since then, fewer than 200 people have sailed in his wake and two of them are also Canadian. IDEAS contributor Philip Coulter explores this greatest challenge sailors set for themselves - possibly the greatest of all human challenges.

Tuesday, April 9
RIEL'S REVENGE
A recent Supreme Court decision in favour of the Manitoba Metis Federation could fundamentally change the nature of Crown/Metis relations in Canada. We hear from interested participants, including Thomas Berger who argued this case for almost three decades; Jean Teillet, Louis Riel's great-grand niece, who intervened on behalf of Metis from Ontario; and David Chartrand, President of the Manitoba Metis.

Wednesday, April 10, Thursday, April 11 & Friday, April 12
GENIUS BORN OF ANGUISH, Part 1, 2 & 3
"The greatest trap in our life is not success, popularity or power, but self-rejection," said Henri Nouwen, Catholic priest, teacher and closeted gay celibate. He has been called a psychologist of the soul. Born in Holland in 1932, Nouwen wrote thirty-nine books about spirituality. He taught at Yale, Harvard and the Menninger Clinic, one world's leading psychiatric hospitals. Concerned about people whom society had rejected, Nouwen spent the last ten years of his life working with mentally challenged people at the Daybreak L'Arche community north of Toronto. A profile by Michael Higgins based on Nouwen's writings, interviews with those who knew him, and archival recordings of Nouwen himself.

Ideas in the Afternoon
Monday, April 8
REVISING HISTORY, Part 1
What happens when historians go searching for new evidence about the nation's past? It can change the way its citizens think about their country as well as their identity. And it can upset both citizens and those who govern them. In Part 1 of this 2-part series, historian Robert Johnson looks at what happens when Russians begin to examine Stalin's vaunted role as a leader during World War II.


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