This Week On Ideas

Monday, January 30
LEFT BEHIND, Part 3
Photo: Occupy K Street demonstrators protest the street of Washington, October 29, 2011. REUTERS/Jose Luis Magana
Over the past 30 years, the benefits of economic growth in Canada, the US and much of the rest of the world, have gone increasingly to the top one percent of the population. For the majority of families, however, incomes have stagnated. This rise in inequality coincided with a sea change in government policy. Beginning in the 1980s, governments in much of the English-speaking world embarked on what has been called the neoliberal revolution - deregulation, privatization and tax cuts, aimed at liberating markets and stimulating the economy. The rising tide was supposed to lift all boats, but it didn't. Jill Eisen explores what happened.

Tuesday, January 31
REFLECTIONS ON THE NORWEGIAN MASSACRE
On July 22, 2011, Norway suffered a catastrophe: its main government buildings were bombed, and scores of young people were killed and maimed at a summer youth congress. Nils Christie, a prominent Norwegian sociologist and criminologist, talks with IDEAS producer David Cayley about what happened and what it means for his country.

Wednesday, February 1
THE NATION OF HOCKEY, Part 1
The back of our five dollar bill shows kids playing shinny on a timeless pond somewhere in Canada. But Calgary writer Bruce Dowbiggin argues that hockey is far more than simple nostalgia or big business. It's a clear window into the complexity of modern Canada: from shifting political power and economics, to multiculturalism and what we think it means to be a Canadian in the 21st century. Part 2 airs on Wednesday, February 8.

Thursday, February 2 - Friday, February 3
TALKING PHILOSOPHY: FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION

Freedom of expression is the cornerstone of a democratic society. Our liberty depends on free and open debate. How then are we to think about nasty, hurtful and offensive speech? Does it need to be heard and discussed? Join IDEAS host Paul Kennedy and philosophers Michael Blake, Simone Chambers and Arthur Ripstein as they freely debate the merits and the limits of expression, in even the freest of democracies.


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