This Week On Ideas

Monday, July 11
AGAINST THE STATE, Part 1
The modern secular state promises justice, good order and freedom. But there have always been those who view the state with unease, as a threat to the freedom of the individual. In 1894, the anarchist Emile Henry threw a bomb into the Café Terminus in Paris. It was the first act of modern terrorism. But anarchism as a political philosophy continues to renew itself, always asking the question: why do we need the state? From Paris then to Athens now, Philip Coulter investigates the idea of anarchism. Part 2 airs Monday, July 18.

Tuesday, July 12
THE HURRIED CHILD
Buying achievement. Rigid regimens. As a society, we are keeping children busy with the business of childhood. Tutoring and computer centers for children are a booming business, and have become America's top franchise of the decade. A new age of anxiety has invaded childhood. IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell examines the costs and consequences of the hurried child.

Wednesday, July 13
DOGS THEMSELVES, Part 1
New evidence reveals what dogs understand, about their world and about people, what they say and how they say it - to each other and to us - and what they know that people don't. The hidden lives of dogs themselves are uncovered by dog observers Jon Katz, Alexandra Horowitz, Clive Wynne and Monique Udell, Xioaming Wang, Gillian Ridgeway, Patricia McConnell, Jennifer Arnold and Suzanne Clothier  in conversation with Max Allen. Part 2 airs Wednesday, July 20.

Thursday, July 14
WILD JOURNEY: THE ANNE INNIS STORY
anne-innis.jpgAt the age of twenty-three, Anne Innis was the first person to study African wildlife in its natural habitat. She blazed a trail that was distinctly Canadian, like her father, the political economist, Harold Innis. Sandy Bourque's documentary, told through Anne's eyes, is the story of one woman's courage and determination to study wild giraffe in South Africa in the 1950s. She offers a provocative witness to the terrible ease and disturbing normality of what would later come to be known as apartheid.

Friday, July 15
SAVING SALMON
For almost forty years, Alexandra Morton studied orcas near the northern tip of Vancouver Island. Those whales eat sockeye salmon. When Morton learned that these fish were endangered, she decided to save the salmon, in order to protect her whales.

Comments are closed.