This Week On Ideas

Monday, February 7
THE ENRIGHT FILES- The Paradox of Fact vs Fiction,
Which is the best way of depicting the world as it is. An award winning essayist and historian and an award winning novelist tackle the Israeli-Palestinian divide. The intriguing thing is that they are both David Grossman. His book The Yellow Wind  is a moving chronicle of the lives of ordinary Palestinians in the occupied territories. His other book, To the End of The Land is a desperately moving novel about loss and redemption in a war torn land. Michael Enright, host of The Sunday Edition, discusses the paradox of fact vs fiction with writer David Grossman.

Tuesday, February 8 - Wednesday, February 9
BEING CANADIAN
being-canadian.jpgIdeas, stories, and reflections on being Canadian: who we are, what we are, and what it means to be a citizen of Canada today. From east to west, public intellectuals and private citizens (both new and old Canadians), tell film-maker Sun-Kyung (Sunny) Yi about the concerns, the questions, and the challenges of living together in a multicultural and diverse society.  Co-written and produced by Sara Wolch.

Thursday, February 10
HAVE YOUR MEAT AND EAT IT TOO, Part 1
We North Americans love our meat. It's cheap, it's plentiful and it's oh so satisfying. Who, except vegetarians can resist the smell of steak, chicken or ribs sizzling on the barbeque? What was once reserved for special occasions has become our everyday fare, sometimes for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Every year, the average North American chomps through 30 whole chickens, a third of a pig and a tenth of a cow - that's about a half a pound of meat a day. And it's not just North America. Worldwide, the per capita consumption of meat has doubled in the past half century. In this 3-part series Jill Eisen asks the question: What do we really know about the meat we buy? Part 2 airs Thursday, February 17.

Friday, February 11
IT'S A TEEN'S WORLD: WIRED FOR SEX, LIES AND POWERTRIPS, Part 3
teens-world-main-thumb.jpgKids today are active players in a sexually charged popular culture, fuelled by media and personal technology. But at what cost? Whether it's posting sexy photos on the internet, raunchy comments and grabbing in the school hallway or spreading explicit gossip that shatters high school lives, harassment is commonplace, even acceptable. Lynn Glazier exposes what it's like for three diverse groups of Toronto teens to navigate a tangled web of sex, lies and power trips in their social relationship.


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