This Week On Ideas

Monday, November 22 - Tuesday, November 23
THE BOOK OF EXODUS
It is a story of epic proportions: an enslaved people's liberation from bondage and their transformation into a nation. Considered one of the most important books in the Bible, the influence of Exodus transcends religious boundaries. CBC producer Frank Faulk explores how this powerful story has reverberated through the centuries and shaped the imagination of the West.

Wednesday, November 24
DUCKS ON THE MOON
Regina playwright and producer, Kelley Jo Burke was an orderly woman with an orderly life. In 2000, she had a perfect baby. But by 2004, order was out the window, as she tried to cope with her perfect but "special" boy. In this performance-documentary, annotated by comments from specialists and other parents, she talks about meeting and accepting her son's autism.

Thursday, November 25
THE 2010 DALTON CAMP LECTURE
She has worked in the world's most dangerous places - Afghanistan, Iraq, Rwanda, Zimbabwe, Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo - to report on the ravages of war and disease. Currently South Asia correspondent for the Globe and Mail, award-winning journalist Stephanie Nolen delivers the 2010 Dalton Camp Lecture in Journalism.

Friday, November 26
THE ORIGINS OF THE MODERN PUBLIC
, Part 11
modern-public-maps.jpgPublicity was once the exclusive property of men of rank. They alone, by virtue of their stations, could make things public. During the 18th century it became meaningful to talk about "public opinion" as something formed outside the state. Today anyone with a Twitter account can make a public. In this series IDEAS producer David Cayley examines how publics were formed in Europe, between 1500 and 1700, and how these early publics grew into the concept of "the public" that we hold today.
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