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The Munk Debates: A More Dangerous Place?

The latest Munk Debate on Obama's Foreign Policy.

The latest Munk Debate on Obama's Foreign Policy.

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Is American foreign policy making the world a more dangerous place? That's the question participants in this autumn's Munk Debates argue over. On the "yes" side: Bret Stephens of The Wall Street Journal, and Robert Kagan of the Brookings Institution's Center on the United States and Europe. On the "no" side: Fareed Zakaria host of CNN's global affairs program. And Anne-Marie Slaughter, former policy director for the U.S. State Department....

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Wind of Another Planet: Music and the Great War

Wind of Another Planet: Music and the Great War

It's often been said that World War One created who we are today: geopolitically and culturally. Contributor Robert Harris explains how music -- classical and popular -- both prefigured and reflected the war in the years leading up to the unprecedented destruction and after.

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Margaret MacMillan and World War One

Margaret MacMillan and World War One

Margaret MacMillan is one of the world's leading scholars on World War One. Her books Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World and The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914 are award-winning bestsellers. She talks with host Paul Kennedy about the origins of the war and what we've learned -- and failed to learn -- from it.

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Wachtel On The Arts - Rem Koolhaas

Wachtel On The Arts - Rem Koolhaas

Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas is admired as much for his radical ideas about buildings and cities as for his daring designs. Koolhaas believes in working for the collective good, while participating in the transformation of cities. As director of the 2014 International Architecture Biennale in Venice, he examined architecture's "human element." Koolhaas talks to Eleanor Wachtel about the interests and experiences that have informed his work in all its various dimensions.

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Belonging - Canada Writes

Belonging - Canada Writes

Where do I belong? How do I belong? Some of us strive to belong -- to feel like we're part of something bigger than ourselves, part of something secure and comfortable. Others recoil at the idea -- to belong is to lose our sense of identity, our sense of self.  Award-winning writers Rawi Hage, Teresa Toten, Susin Nielsen, and Priscila Uppal share personal stories that reveal the complexity of belonging.

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Lost Innocence, Part 5 - Scars of the Second Generation

Lost Innocence, Part 5 - Scars of the Second Generation

The story of six extraordinary people -- the youngest, born in 1950; the oldest only six months before hostilities began in 1939. Three are the children of Jewish Holocaust survivors; three, the children of German Nazis. We hear about their struggle with the legacy of their parents' wartime experience.

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Coming Home

Coming Home

"I want to tell you about something I'm very glad I did: becoming a Canadian Citizen." Changing countries is no small step. In this IDEAS classic from 1995, Seth Feldman, an American by birth and a long-time contributor to IDEAS, tells the story of his initiation and integration into the Canadian way of life: the culture, the climate, the rituals and the politics.

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Being Canadian, Part 2

Being Canadian, Part 2

Ideas, stories, and reflections on being Canadian: who we are, what we are, and what it means to be a citizen of Canada. In this IDEAS classic from 2010, public intellectuals and private citizens from east to west (both new and old Canadians), tell filmmaker Sun-Kyung (Sunny) Yi about the concerns, the questions, and the challenges of living together in a multicultural and diverse society.

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Being Canadian, Part 1

Being Canadian, Part 1

Ideas, stories, and reflections on being Canadian: who we are, what we are, and what it means to be a citizen of Canada. In this IDEAS classic from 2010, public intellectuals and private citizens from east to west (both new and old Canadians), tell filmmaker Sun-Kyung (Sunny) Yi about the concerns, the questions, and the challenges of living together in a multicultural and diverse society.

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The Enright Files - The Giller Effect

The Enright Files - The Giller Effect

The Scotiabank Giller Prize is one of the most prestigious of literary prizes. The ceremony to award for this year's Giller Prize is coming up on November 10th. On this edition of The Enright Files, we revisit conversations with three writers who have been part of the Gillers in one way or another over the years: Claire Messud, whose  The Woman Upstairs made the long list in 2013; American novelist Jonathan Lethem, who served on the jury in 2013; and Esi Edugyan, whose Half-Blood Blues took home the prize in 2011.

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Lost Innocence, Part 4 - Like There Was No Tomorrow

Lost Innocence, Part 4 - Like There Was No Tomorrow

Remember your first love? The joy and the pain of it all. Imagine that it bloomed against the backdrop of the world on fire. The war drew everyone into its aura of excitement, danger and drama. It made people more keenly aware of each other. It brought them together and tore them apart. For teenagers it was a very special time to be growing up. The war set the stage for magical beginnings of innocent relationships, infatuations and love. But it was also a first time for kids to experience the incredible pain of a broken heart, separation, betrayal or the death of a sweetheart. In so many ways, World War Two shaped the course of their romantic lives.

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