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I'm Sorry: The Art and Artifice of the Apology

L to R: Bill Clinton (Win McNamee/Reuters), Rob Ford (Chris Young/CP) and Eliot Spitzer (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

L to R: Bill Clinton (Win McNamee/Reuters), Rob Ford (Chris Young/CP) and Eliot Spitzer (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Prime Minister Stephen Harper apologizes to residential school survivors. Bill Clinton says he's sorry for sexual transgressions. Whether apologies come from the political elite or your next door neighbour, we are awash in a sea of "I'm sorry". Josh Bloch examines when an apology is effective and whose interests it serves....

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Death Becomes Us, Part 2

Death Becomes Us, Part 2

Death is called the greatest of equalizers -- the greatest of mysteries. At one time we tended to our dead with home funerals and mourning rituals. But, over the last century death has been outsourced to mortuary professionals. Now multinational chains are buying up mom-and-pop operations, offering package deals on funerals. However, the corporatization of death is being challenged: death midwives are returning care of the dead to families by helping us face death and aiding families in arranging intimate home funerals.  IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell explores these diverging trends.

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The Trouble with Tolerance, Part 1

The Trouble with Tolerance, Part 1

We rant, we debate, and we're full of opinions: Is Canada too tolerant for its own good? Should we tolerate intolerant people? What are the limits to tolerance? In this three-part IDEAS Classic from 2007, philosopher Michael Blake, mediator Genevieve Chornenki, filmmaker Sunny Yi and IDEAS Producer Sara Wolch, tackle the nature and meaning of tolerance in our diverse and seemingly tolerant society. Part 2 airs Wednesday, February 4; Part 3 airs Wednesday, February 11.

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The 2014 BBC Reith Lectures - The Future of Medicine, Part 2

The 2014 BBC Reith Lectures - The Future of Medicine, Part 2
Surgeon, professor and author Atul Gawande dissects a field defined by what he calls "the messy intersection of science and human fallibility." In this episode: The Problem of Hubris about the limits of what professionals can do, and The Idea of Well-being, about shifting focus from medical survival to general well-being.

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The 2014 BBC Reith Lectures - The Future of Medicine, Part 1

The 2014 BBC Reith Lectures - The Future of Medicine, Part 1

Surgeon, professor and author Atul Gawande dissects a field defined by what he calls "the messy intersection of science and human fallibility." In hour one, Why Do Doctors Fail? about imperfection in medicine, and The Century of the System about the dominance of treatment systems.  In hour two, The Problem of Hubris about the limits of what professionals can do, and The Idea of Well-being, about shifting focus from medical survival to general well-being.

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The Battle of New Orleans

The Battle of New Orleans

The concluding episode of IDEAS' commemoration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812 takes us 'down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico', for the Battle of New Orleans. IDEAS host Paul Kennedy considers one of the most celebrated (and misunderstood) battles of a much misunderstood war.

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Death Becomes Us, Part 1

Death Becomes Us, Part 1

Death is called the greatest of equalizers -- the greatest of mysteries. At one time we tended to our dead with home funerals and mourning rituals. Over the last century we pushed death further from our collective mind by outsourcing our dead to mortuary professionals. But our thinking about death may be changing. In recent years, a new phenomenon has taken hold: the rise of Death Cafes -- a place where citizens can explore their fears and concerns about any aspect of death. IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell explores this growing trend. Part 2 airs Thursday, January 29; Part 3 airs Thursday, February 5.

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From Tolerance to Tyranny

From Tolerance to Tyranny

Christians, Muslims and Jews lived together in relative harmony in medieval Spain. Then the Spanish Inquisition came along with its use of terror and racism, turning a pluralistic society into a police state. Writer Erna Paris first explored this history for IDEAS in 1995. In a new take, she calls what happened in Spain "a cautionary tale for today."

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Wachtel On The Arts - Leon Fleisher

Wachtel On The Arts - Leon Fleisher

Eleanor Wachtel talks to celebrated San Fransico-born musician Leon Fleisher. At the peak of his career, a mysterious affliction left him unable to play the piano with his right hand. The dark period that followed eventually took him in new directions, including conducting, teaching, and exploring the left-hand repertoire. At the age of 86, he's still performing. Leon Fleisher talks to Eleanor about his inspiring personal journey and lifelong passion for music.

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Tapping into Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tapping into Martin Luther King, Jr.

When IDEAS spoke with Harry Belafonte for the documentary To Heal a Sick Nation, we realized that the great singer and activist had much more to say about Dr. King, America and the way institutions of power operate. On the occasion of MLK Day, we present his full conversation with Paul Kennedy.

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Not With The Eyes

Not With The Eyes

"Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind," Helena remarks jealously in A Midsummer Night's Dream. And she's right, people have always fallen in love for reasons that have nothing to do with beauty. Psychoanalyst Adrienne Harris and Shakespeare scholar M.J. Kidnie discuss the politics of gender and love in Shakespeare's time and ours.

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