Featured

Fragile Freedoms - First Nations and human rights

John Borrows

John Borrows

Listen

John Borrows is an Anishinabe scholar and expert in Indigenous law. He presents a lecture on the connections between First Nations and human rights. It's from a series called Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle Human Rights presented at the new Canadian Museum for Human Rights, in Winnipeg.

Read More »

Fragile Freedoms - First Nations and human rights

Fragile Freedoms - First Nations and human rights

John Borrows is an Anishinabe scholar and expert in Indigenous law. He presents a lecture on the connections between First Nations and human rights. It's from a series called Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle Human Rights presented at the new Canadian Museum for Human Rights, in Winnipeg.

Read More »

Listen

Once Upon A Planet

Once Upon A Planet

Science fiction writers have been dreaming up planets - and aliens - for years. But recently, astronomers have discovered hundreds of planets far beyond our solar system. Is there life on those planets, too? In fact and in fiction, Stephen Humphrey explores our need to know that we're not alone in the cosmos.

Read More »

Listen

Alone Inside

Alone Inside

When the concept of solitary confinement was first implemented in the early 19th century, the idea was not to punish the prisoner, but to give him space to reflect and reform. Two centuries later, despite the growing use of segregation in Canada and the United States, the practice continues to produce very different results. Prisoners who have lived through solitary confinement say the experience is torturous. Freelance journalist Brett Story explores the roots of this practice in North America, and the profound and often devastating impact it has on people who are severed from social contact.

Read More »

Listen

Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing

Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing

What makes a champion? Why do some wilt in high-pressure competition, while others rise to the occasion? Drawing on science, psychology, sports and economics, authors Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman explore the anatomy of building champions. We also feature stories from freestyle wrestling champion Ohenewa Akuffo, Muay Thai world champion Clifton Brown and budding figure-skater Annie DeCoteau-Vogelsang.

Read More »

Listen

Catching the Game

Catching the Game

Why do so many of us devote so much time to watching sports? And why do so many others seem immune?  Paul Kennedy settles into his seat to watch for an answer.

Read More »

Listen

Fragile Freedoms - Kwame Anthony Appiah

Fragile Freedoms - Kwame Anthony Appiah

Kwame Anthony Appiah is a Ghanaian-born philosopher and cultural theorist. In this episode of IDEAS, he ponders the inseparable links between culture, identity, and human rights. From the lecture series Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg.

Read More »

Listen

The Chosen, Part 2

The Chosen, Part 2

It's an idea that is ancient, and yet time has not dulled its vitality. It's an idea that echoes throughout history, and has inspired both genocide - and selfless service to others. It's alive today in the rhetoric of American politicians trumpeting their country's "special role in the world." But it's also alive in the lives of ordinary people who devote their time helping the marginalized and forgotten. It's the biblical idea of chosenness.

IDEAS producer Frank Faulk examines this biblical concept's centrality to Western thought and culture, through the lens of religion, politics, and psychology.

Read More »

Listen

The Great Book of Knowledge, Part 2

The Great Book of Knowledge, Part 2

We used to need libraries to make the sum of human knowledge available to all. Today we have Wikipedia, where the sum of human knowledge can be shaped by all of us. But can we trust it? Philip Coulter suggests that the collective mind is perhaps the best mind we have.

Read More »

Listen

Human Rights and Today's Aboriginal Children and Youth

Human Rights and Today's Aboriginal Children and Youth

Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond is British Columbia's Representative for Children and Youth. She believes the welfare of aboriginal children is a human rights issue. In the 2013 Vancouver Human Rights Lecture, Turpel-Lafond makes the case there's been little progress on the human rights of First Nation's children in today's Canada. The 2013 Vancouver Human Rights Lecture is presented in collaboration with The Laurier Institution, UBC Continuing Studies, and CBC Radio One's IDEAS.

Listen

After Atheism: New Perspectives on God and Religion, Part 5

After Atheism: New Perspectives on God and Religion, Part 5

Public discussion of religion tends to polarize between two extremes: religious fundamentalism, and the aggressive atheism of such writers as Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens. But much of what people actually believe falls somewhere in between. It is subtler and more tentative. David Cayley explores the work of five thinkers whose books have charted new paths for religion. Part 5: Roger Lundin

Read More »

Listen