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Bottom's Dream

A still from Peter Sellars production of A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Chamber Play at the Stratford Festival. Photo by Michael Cooper.

A still from Peter Sellars production of A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Chamber Play at the Stratford Festival. Photo by Michael Cooper.

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"The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen..." Director Peter Sellars turned A Midsummer Night's Dream on its head at the Stratford Festival. For him, the play is not so much a comedy, as a vision that speaks to the depths of human experience: how we love, what we need, and how we come to understand that the universe may be beyond our comprehension....

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Wachtel On The Arts - Suzy Lake

Wachtel On The Arts - Suzy Lake

Suzy Lake broke out in the 1970s, becoming one of the very few prominent women in Canadian visual art at the time. She mixed performances with photography, using her own face and body to create works about the experience of wrestling with prescribed roles (and forging new ones). The Art Gallery of Ontario is saluting Suzy Lake's career in an exhibition of her most famous works from the past 40 years. Eleanor Wachtel spoke with Suzy Lake live on-stage at the Art Gallery of Ontario, as the exhibition opened. Introducing Suzy Lake runs until March 22, 2015.

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The Sobey Art Award: The New Masters

The Sobey Art Award: The New Masters
It is in today's art, we often see the future.

The Sobey Art Award, created in 2002, is Canada's pre-eminent award for contemporary Canadian art. It is a celebration of the next big thing in the art world.

The annual prize is given to an artist under age 40, who has exhibited in a public or commercial art gallery within 18 months of being nominated.

In addition to the $50,000 prize awarded to the winner of the Sobey Art Award, each of the four short-listed artists are awarded $10,000 and $500 is awarded to each of the remaining twenty long-listed artists.

Over two shows, IDEAS profiles the five regional finalists. From the West Coast and Yukon: Evan Lee. Prairies and the North: Michael Dumontier and Neil Farber. Ontario: Chris Curreri. Quebec: Nadia Myre. The Atlantic: Graeme Patterson. The programs air on December 15 & 22, and are produced in partnership with The Art Gallery of Nova Scotia.

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Sense and Social Anthropology

Sense and Social Anthropology

With a slight nod to Jane Austen who wonderfully articulated the emotional impact of cultural presumptions, journalist and anthropologist Maureen Matthews explores the anthropology of sensory perception. The cultural structuring of our senses shapes how our brains decide what we see and what we think.

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The Sharing Economy and The Public Good, Part 1

The Sharing Economy and The Public Good, Part 1

Who wins, who loses and what's destined to change if a sharing economy is sustainable: business, society or the state? This is a special 2-part event produced by IDEAS in partnership with The Munk School of Global Affairs. Featuring economic and social theorist Jeremy Rifkin, author of The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism along with a stellar panel of economic and political thinkers, including lawyer, mediator and political leader Bob Rae, economist and author Anita M. McGahan, and moderator Janice Stein, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs. Part 2 airs Thursday, December 18.

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Shakespeare's Web

Shakespeare's Web

"Theatre gives you the chance to stop the flow of time", says noted director Peter Sellars, talking at the Stratford Festival, about the world according to Shakespeare. It's a giant web of the imagination, woven together for us. 

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Shackleton's Grave

Shackleton's Grave

Underwater explorer Dr. Joe MacInnis makes a pilgrimage to the grave of Sir Ernest Shackleton, on remote South Georgia Island, in the extreme South Atlantic Ocean. In so doing, the first person to dive under the North Pole, pays homage to the man who completely dominated South Pole exploration.

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Rwanda Reconciliation

Rwanda Reconciliation

The brutality and bloodshed of the Rwandan genocide 20 years ago was unfathomable. And whether we learned enough to prevent it from happening again is questionable. Rwandan musician Jean-Paul Samputu tells his story of heartbreaking loss and breathtaking reconciliation with the man who killed his family. Also in the program, Payam Akhavan -- first legal advisor to the prosecutor's office of the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda at The Hague.

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To Heal A Sick Nation: Martin Luther King, Jr. and IDEAS (with videos)

To Heal A Sick Nation: Martin Luther King, Jr. and IDEAS (with videos)

By 1967, Martin Luther King, Jr. saw his dream becoming "a nightmare". Criticised by black militants, rejected by white allies, and threatened with death as violence tore America apart, he delivered the Massey Lectures, produced by Janet Somerville. Now -- for the first time -- she reveals the behind-the-scenes story leading to King's message of hope. Conceived, researched and prepared by Montreal-based journalist, Stephen Smith.

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The Sharing Economy

The Sharing Economy

From AirBnB and Uber to tool libraries and swapping fairs, we're now selling, bartering, and sharing things with each other on an unprecedented scale, thanks to new technologies. Anne Wright-Howard examines how this new economic model challenges 20th century notions of ownership, commerce, government regulation, wealth and personal identity.

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The Science of Shakespeare

The Science of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare was born 450 years ago into a period when new ideas about the human body, the earth and the universe were threatening the old medieval worldview. Journalist and author Dan Falk examines the science of the Bard of Avon.

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