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Tinctor's Foul Manual

A typical page from 'Tinctor's Foul Manual', complete with illumination and candle wax from a reader who lingered on the page.

A typical page from 'Tinctor's Foul Manual', complete with illumination and candle wax from a reader who lingered on the page.

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Our ideas about witches and witch hunts may come from an extraordinary manuscript found in the University of Alberta Library. It's one of only four known copies. Written in the 1400s and now being re-translated from medieval French, it created the framework for witch hunts. Dave Redel carefully opens its cover.

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The Human Factor - Hannah Arendt

The Human Factor - Hannah Arendt

Was Adolph Eichmann not ultimately responsible for the destruction of six million Jews? Or were Jews themselves partially to blame for their own fate? Fifty years ago, the political philosopher Hannah Arendt published a famous book that seemed to imply these things, and created an instant uproar that has never ended. Roger Berkowitz, Adam Gopnik, Rivka Galchen and Adam Kirsch debate the reality behind Hannah Arendt and her ideas.

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The Revolution Will Be Extruded

The Revolution Will Be Extruded

There's a lot of buzz about 3-D printers -- guns! skin grafts! pizza in space! But as Regina computer scientist David Gerhard discovers, these machines, and the people who use them, are about to revolutionize the way we think about manufacturing, and how we get stuff.

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Marathon: Going the Distance

Marathon: Going the Distance

26 miles, 385 yards, an Athenian soldier named Pheidippides started it all when he covered the distance between the battlefield at Marathon and the marketplace at Athens. He raised his arms,shouted, "We conquer!" and promptly died. The rest is history and more than a little mythology. Since Pheidippides, the marathon has moved many miles from the realm of myth and metaphor into the strange territory of science and high tech. With a tip of the hat in the direction of today's 118th running of the Boston Marathon-- and in recognition of his 15th season as host of IDEAS -- Paul Kennedy pays tribute to the ultimate test of physical endurance.

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The Witness Trees

The Witness Trees

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's epic poem Evangeline begins with the words "This is the forest primeval". Longfellow was talking about the rich Acadian forest, and was taking a little poetic license. In fact, settlers and boat-builders had already pillaged those forests. They were later altered again and again as the pulp and paper industry flourished. Some wonder whether those forests of 500 years ago can be regrown. Are our forests fiber mines or recreational playgrounds? Are they an economic engine or necessary for our environmental health? And are they essential, as some neuroscientific research is suggesting, to our mental well being? IDEAS contributor Dick Miller re-imagines the forest of the future.

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Fragile Freedoms - Vandana Shiva

Fragile Freedoms - Vandana Shiva

Physicist Vandana Shiva has become one of the world's leading environmental thinkers. In a lecture presented at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, she explores how "earth rights" are human rights. From the lecture series Fragile Freedoms: the Global Struggle for Human Rights.

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Bugs 'R Us

Bugs 'R Us

We are constantly at war with microbes -- SARS, MERS, E.coli, C.difficile -- filthy little organisms that threaten our health and safety. These pathogens can be deadly, but have we gone too far? Is eliminating our exposure to microbes actually bad for us? Microbiologist Dr. Brett Finlay argues that we're entering a golden era in our understanding of microbes, and that new technologies are giving us unprecedented insights into health and disease. This lecture was presented by the Peter Wall Institute of Advanced Studies.

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Wachtel On The Arts - Stan Douglas

Wachtel On The Arts - Stan Douglas

Stan Douglas is both a cutting-edge contemporary art star, and a neighbourhood historian of his home city. From his downtown Vancouver studio, he makes new works of photography and video that look like something out of the city archive. Eleanor Wachtel talks to Stan Douglas about his work, and his latest project Helen Lawrence, a theatre piece, created in collaboration with television writer Chris Haddock.

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The Science of Shakespeare

The Science of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare was born 450 years ago this month, into a period when new ideas about the human body, the earth and the universe were threatening the old medieval worldview. Journalist and author Dan Falk examines the science of the Bard of Avon.

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The Next Big Thing Has Finally Arrived

The Next Big Thing Has Finally Arrived

For years, people proclaimed that the Internet was going to completely transform media. In 2013, it actually happened. That's the argument of The New York Times media columnist David Carr who delivers the 2013 Dalton Camp Lecture in Journalism at St. Thomas University in Fredericton. He argues that the campfires built by traditional media companies are going out and new methods of content creation and distribution are taking hold.

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Unfinished Business

Unfinished Business

Twenty years after the first free elections in South Africa, the country still struggles with lawlessness, social equity, and the structures of civil society. But, across the bitter divides of race and class, many have begun to make their peace with each other: black and white, the privileged and those with little hope. From the documentary series The Long Walk to Freedom, which first aired in 2004, Philip Coulter tells the story of a massacre, and one woman's act of grace and reconciliation.

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