Violence in Lower Canada's Countryside
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Violence in Lower Canada's Countryside
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Violence in Lower Canada's Countryside

Beginning in October 1837, violence broke out in Lower Canada's countryside.

In the county of Two Mountains and in the Richelieu Valley, Patriotes harassed local officials who refused to join them.
In parts of Lower Canada, Patriotes harassed and intimidated local officials who refused to join their cause. (As portrayed in Canada: A People's History)
In parts of Lower Canada, Patriotes harassed and intimidated local officials who refused to join their cause. (As portrayed in Canada: A People's History)
At the same time, the unrest was spreading in Upper Canada.

The spreading violence preoccupied the British military commander in North America, General John Colborne, a veteran of the Napoleonic wars. On November 12, 1837, he wrote to the Governor General of Canada, Archibald Acheson, the Earl of Gosford:

"(The) revolutionists are running over a large section of the country armed and menacing every individual who hesitates to join them. (...) If we neglect to profit by the offers from the Upper Province and those of the inhabitants of Montreal to assist by raising corps, while we permit the declared revolutionists to arm quietly, we shall lose the Province."

In Montreal, the arrival of soldiers from the neighbouring colonies heightened the tension.

The Patriote leaders retreated to their strongholds: Saint-Benoît and Saint-Eustache in the county of Two Mountains, or Saint-Denis and Saint-Charles in the Richelieu Valley.
General John Colborne commanded the British forces during the 1837 rebellion. (As portrayed by Dennis St. John in Canada: A People's History)
General John Colborne commanded the British forces during the 1837 rebellion. (As portrayed by Dennis St. John in Canada: A People's History)
Among them was Louis-Joseph Papineau.

Arrest warrants for high treason were issued against them all by the authorities. General Colborne wanted to capture the leaders of the revolt:

"The civil authorities (...) have called for the military to assist them in apprehending these persons (...). It is of the greatest importance to drag the leaders of the revolt from their meeting places."

General Colborne ordered troops into the Richelieu Valley.
He wanted to strike first, before the insurgents could mount a serious military threat

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Violence in Lower Canada's Countryside

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