Fort St. Jean Falls
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Invasion or Liberation
Fort St. Jean Falls
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Fort St. Jean Falls
Fort St. Jean Falls
When Benedict Arnold's army was still six weeks away from Quebec, Brigadier-General Richard Montgomery's Americans had already begun the invasion.
Montreal resident Thrse Baby wrote to her brother at the start of the American Revolution, " You can not imagine the terror that has overtaken us all...many people are getting ready to leave altogether." (As portrayed by Louise Marleau in Canada: A Peop
Montreal resident Thrse Baby wrote to her brother at the start of the American Revolution, " You can not imagine the terror that has overtaken us all...many people are getting ready to leave altogether." (As portrayed by Louise Marleau in Canada: A Peop
Several hundred Canadians had joined their ranks and Quebec was falling to the invader piece by piece.

"Last Thursday... we were told that the enemy had taken possession of Laprairie and Longueuil," wrote Thérèse Baby, a widow living in Montreal. "Our dread was even greater the next day when we saw our troop begin packing their bags... Everyone was fleeing as though from a fire."

All that stood between Montreal and the enemy was the fort at St. Jean. Beginning September 16, Montgomery's force of 1,000 men joined by the Canadians besieged the fort for eight weeks. His militiamen were volunteers, mostly settlers, an undisciplined, reluctant group who were ravaged by disease; hundreds were discharged as unfit for duty.

Inside the fort were about 200 British regulars, a handful of Canadian militia, and 80 women and children.
Two hundred British soldiers, a handful of Canadian militia and 80 women and children held out for seven weeks during the American siege of Fort St. Jean. (As portrayed in Canada: A People's History)
Two hundred British soldiers, a handful of Canadian militia and 80 women and children held out for seven weeks during the American siege of Fort St. Jean. (As portrayed in Canada: A People's History)
Their supply lines had been cut. For the first few weeks, they stretched their ammunition and rations and the siege was bearable. After a month, the American guns began to take their toll. Every day there were new casualties as the people inside the fort battled famine.

On November 1, an eight-hour bombardment destroyed most of the buildings inside the fort. In the morning British Lieutenant Jean Andre knew it was the end.

"The weather grew very cold and the situation of the sick and wounded was a very cruel one. They were neither out of reach of danger nor sheltered from the inclemency of the weather.
As many as could find room in the cellars slept there. The rest, unable to get a place slept above in cold and danger. There was now nothing left but to frame the best articles we could for the garrison."

On November 3, Major Charles Preston finally surrendered Fort St. Jean. In the Articles of Capitulation Montgomery praised the enemy's valour, adding that it was too bad it wasn't for a worthier cause. Preston ordered the clause to be stricken or they would fight to the death. Montgomery agreed, conceding this small victory.

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Montgomery Takes Montreal
Introduction
Introduction
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Montgomery Takes Montreal
Montgomery Takes Montreal
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Benedict Arnold marches on Quebec
Benedict Arnold marches on Quebec
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Carleton Rallies
Carleton Rallies
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British Reinforcements Save Quebec
British Reinforcements Save Quebec
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