Destruction and heavy losses
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Fortress Louisbourg
Destruction and heavy losses
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Destruction and heavy losses
Destruction and heavy losses
By late July 1758, the British siege of Louisbourg had lasted for almost two months.
Louisbourg inhabitants panicked when the British bombardment began. (As portrayed in Canada: A People's History)
Louisbourg inhabitants panicked when the British bombardment began. (As portrayed in Canada: A People's History)
The town was strewn with rubble, the batteries almost ruined. Only twelve cannons were still able to fire. The dead piled up like cordwood. But Governor Augustin de Drucour would not get any mercy from the British when he asked for help for Louisbourg's wounded.

"When the French are in a scrape they are ready to cry out in behalf of the human species; when fortune favours them, none more bloody, more inhuman," wrote General Jeffery Amherst's brigadier James Wolfe. "Montcalm has changed the very nature of war, and has forced us, in some measure, to a deterring and dreadful vengeance."

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Friction before the War
Friction before the War
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British invasion
British invasion
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Brigadier James Wolfe
Brigadier James Wolfe
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Marie-Anne de Drucour: "La Bombardire"
Marie-Anne de Drucour: "La Bombardire"
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Surrender
Surrender
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James Wolfe appointed General
James Wolfe appointed General
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