Battle for a Continent
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Battle for a Continent
Another fight for Quebec
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Battle of Ste. Foy
At the end of the winter of 1760, as the ice in the St.
On April 28, 1760, British and French troops fought again on the Plains of Abraham, in the Battle of Ste. Foy. (As portrayed in Canada: A People's History)
On April 28, 1760, British and French troops fought again on the Plains of Abraham, in the Battle of Ste. Foy. (As portrayed in Canada: A People's History)
Lawrence slowly cleared, British General James Murray in Quebec and French General François-Gaston de Lévis in Montreal watched anxiously to see what Europe would bring. They had no news of the war there, no idea which fleet would sail triumphantly up the river.

Lévis hoped that the 4,000 reinforcements he had asked for would come. He marched to Quebec with his army of 7,000, prepared to wage battle. Also with him were about 300 Indians and a troop of 83 armed Black men.

At about 8 a.m. on April 28, 1760, Lévis stood on the Plains of Abraham where the British General James Wolfe had stood seven months earlier. Only about 3,900 of Lévis' troops joined him on the battlefield. The rest, still marching through the woods, wouldn't arrive until the next morning.
In the second battle on the Plains of Abraham, British soldiers were defeated and retreated behind the walls of Quebec. (As portrayed in Canada: A People's History)
In the second battle on the Plains of Abraham, British soldiers were defeated and retreated behind the walls of Quebec. (As portrayed in Canada: A People's History)
Murray took his 3,800 troops to Butte � Neveu, the hill above the Plains where the French General, the Marquis de Montcalm, had been. The English and French were about to replay the battle of the Plains of Abraham, having changed positions.

"...about eight-o'clock in the morning the whole garrison, exclusive of the guards, was drawn up on the parade," Malcolm Fraser, of the 78th Highlanders, wrote, "and about nine o'clock we marched out of Town with twenty pieces of Field Artillery. When we had marched a little way out of Town, we saw the advanced parties of the enemy nigh the woods about half a league distant from us. When we were about three quarters of a mile out of Town, the General ordered the whole to draw up in line of Battle, two deep, and take up as much room as possible."

Murray thought that the French lines hadn't fully formed, and he attacked, hoping to catch them in disarray.
In doing so, he made the same mistake that Montcalm had made in abandoning the high ground. The cannon sank in the spongy spring ground and the soldiers laboured in the muck. The two armies fired volleys into one another for two hours, with brutal, intense and often hand-to-hand fighting. The tide finally turned in favour of the French and the British retreated to Quebec.

The verdict of the Plains of Abraham, with the same armies, on the same field, was reversed. At the Battle of Ste.
Foy, as it was called, the French were victorious but the British remained in control of Quebec.

Still, there was a new hope that Canada could be regained. Sister Marie de la Visitation made note of the triumph: "The intrepidity and valour of the French and Canadians drove the enemy from their strong position...We remained masters of the field, and of their cannon, and made many prisoners. The enemy retired within the walls, and dared not again venture out."


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Battle for a Continent
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Carving the spoils
Another fight for Quebec
Battle of Ste. Foy
Reinforcements from Europe
French surrender at Montreal
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British control of Quebec

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