Health

Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

For the love of it

Comments (3)
By Peter Hadzipetros

So Keizo Yamada is giving up racing marathons. Japan's Iron Man is conceding that he's not up to the training anymore.

He made the decision after running three marathons this year, including his 19th trip to Boston – a race he won in 1953. He ran the marathon for Japan the year before at the Olympics in Helsinki.

Yamada's 81. A pretty fit octogenarian.

He told Sports Hochi newspaper "I'm not getting any younger so I won't run any more 42-kilometre races."

"I will carry on running for fun to stay in shape," he added.

His "running for fun" is a daily 20-kilometre jaunt. That's more exercise than the vast majority of even the most active people get. If it's not fun, it's pretty tough to be motivated to enjoy that much exercise.

Researchers have spent a lot of time and effort trying to figure out the most effective ways of getting people motivated to get active enough to stay healthy and ward off obesity.

Two years ago, the Canadian Obesity Network warned that – without action – Canada would face an obesity epidemic that would be a bigger drain on the health-care system than smoking. The network estimates that 11 million Canadians – about a third of the population – are overweight and a million of them are so obese they need treatment.

Last week, an Australian study found that spending money on public campaigns can make a difference in getting people active. The study found that encouraging the use of pedometers was more effective than having doctors refer patients to an exercise physiologist.

Pedometers give you instant feedback. They'll tell you how many steps you've taken, how far you've gone and how many calories you've burned.

Feedback's good. You can use those numbers as a base to build on. That can help develop motivation far better than a piece of paper that will get you in to see a specialist – a piece of paper that you might ignore.

The findings of the Australian study were similar to one published in the July 2008 edition of the journal Medicine & Science in Sports and Exercise. Among its conclusions was that it's more effective to encourage people to walk at a moderate pace than to prescribe high-intensity walking.

That's right: exercise doesn't have to be this high-intensity medicine that you have to force yourself to swallow every day.

Casting a wide net with mass campaigns might get more people moving, like the ParticipACTION ads did when it was first launched back in the 1970s. But information and encouragement won't be much help in keeping you motivated, especially after you figure out that getting in shape is not the end goal. You don't go back to your old sedentary ways once you hit that target weight – or complete your first five-kilometre race.

Getting in shape – and staying there – is the payoff for being a little more active, for the rest of your life.

Keizo Yamada may be through with marathons, but he's not done testing his limits. He says he could still be coaxed into racing the odd half marathon.

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

This discussion is now Open. Submit your Comment.

Comments (3)

ned

There's only a few people who dedicate themselves physically and maintain that status in todays society. With technology evolving every year, it makes it hard for the average person to take time out of the day to exercise. These people must take advatage of situations were they will the required exercise, such as taking the stairs, walking to the corner store, diet, while watching TV try stretching your legs and arms.

Posted July 30, 2009 03:24 PM

Addie Bundren

AB

On motivation: Exercise started out for me as as an alternative to smoking, which I'd just given up after many, many years of very enjoyable but, yes, dangerous, indulgence. The idea was, go back to smoking and you'll have to give up something fairly tangible and healthy like, in my case, swimming. It took about seven months to get good which was the first motivation--continuous improvement. After that, staring at the bottom of the pool day after day got pretty monotonous but, hey, why not keep track and swim across Canada, so to speak? And pay attention, too: Remember, today, for example, how lousy you were seven months ago? Remember how good you feel physically (bounce to step) and mentally (conquer the world, at least for a minute) when you're done, or on those rare sweet days when everything clicks and you don't want to stop? Notice how much more juice you seem to have compared to your sedentary buds? Of course, the chlorine (particularly as chemically combined with human organic matter) and lack of ventilation got my lungs in the end (i.e. irony). But there's still biking, running, and the exercise bug.

Posted July 22, 2009 11:24 PM

cyclistextraordinaire

Guelph

Here is, in my opinion, the most easy way to get exercise: give up using your car for any commutes under, say, 5km. You'd be surprised at how much exercise you will get over the course of they day. You will be fit in no time and save some money to boot!

I find that it is very difficult for a person who is not bent toward exercise to find something physical that they like. I believe this is why there is a direct link between car ownership and obesity--it is hard to exercise when you are not forced to do so.

Posted July 22, 2009 09:10 AM

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

Post a Comment

Disclaimer:

Note: By submitting your comments you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that due to the volume of e-mails we receive, not all comments will be published, and those that are published will not be edited. But all will be carefully read, considered and appreciated.

Privacy Policy | Submissions Policy

Back of the Pack »

About the Author

Peter HadzipetrosPeter Hadzipetros is a producer for the Consumer and Health sites of CBC News Online. Until he got off the couch and got into long distance running a few years ago, he was a net importer of calories.

More from Peter Hadzipetros »

Recent Posts

Exercise, not 'guardian angels' key to avoiding falls
Peter Hadzipetros
Wednesday, July 29, 2009
For the love of it
Peter Hadzipetros
Tuesday, July 21, 2009
Keep on exercising
Peter Hadzipetros
Friday, May 29, 2009
Massage: not all it's cracked up to be?
Peter Hadzipetros
Friday, May 8, 2009
Sports drinks: playing with your brain
Peter Hadzipetros
Friday, April 17, 2009
Subscribe to this blog

Recent Comments

There's only a few people who dedicate themselves physica...
For the love of it
On motivation: Exercise started out for me as as an alter...
For the love of it
Here is, in my opinion, the most easy way to get exercise...
For the love of it

Archives

July 2009 (2)
May 2009 (2)
April 2009 (1)
March 2009 (1)
February 2009 (1)
January 2009 (1)
December 2008 (1)
September 2008 (1)
July 2008 (2)
June 2008 (2)
May 2008 (1)
April 2008 (2)
February 2008 (1)
January 2008 (2)
December 2007 (2)
November 2007 (4)
October 2007 (3)
September 2007 (3)
August 2007 (3)
July 2007 (4)
June 2007 (5)
May 2007 (3)
April 2007 (6)
March 2007 (3)
February 2007 (6)
January 2007 (7)
December 2006 (2)
November 2006 (3)
October 2006 (3)
September 2006 (4)
August 2006 (5)
[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

World »

Updated Hong Kong protesters poised to occupy buildings if leader won't budge video
Hong Kong's leader is willing to let pro-democracy demonstrations blocking large areas of the city go on for weeks if necessary, a source close to him said, while defiant protesters vowed they would escalate their occupation.
Special Report Ebola outbreak sees MSF scale up in Liberia as patients keep coming video
The UN mission dealing with the Ebola response has set bold goals to try and contain the outbreak, but in Liberia's capital, medical providers like Doctors Without Borders are working flat out just to keep up.
Michael Dunn convicted of 1st-degree murder in Florida loud music shooting
A jury convicted a Florida man on Wednesday of first-degree murder in his retrial for killing a teenager after an argument over loud music.
more »

Canada »

Updated Paralysis cases in Alberta under investigation for Enterovirus D68 link
Alberta Health Services says it's investigating four cases of paralysis in children, but the patients have not been diagnosed with Enterovirus D68.
Conservatives to overhaul veterans' benefits again to placate angry ex-soldiers
The Harper government plans further changes to its oft-maligned veterans charter, hoping to take the political sting out of complaints by ex-soldiers promising to campaign against them in the next election.
Canadian auto sales on track for record year
Ford Motors says it continues its reign as Canada's top-selling automaker but GM Canada is experiencing a turnaround with a 34 per cent jump in sales since last year in September.
more »

Politics »

Breaking Stephen Harper to announce Canada's combat role in ISIS fight Friday
The federal government will announce Friday the combat role Canada will play in the fight against ISIS, a day before the current 30-day mission ends, CBC News has learned.
Conservatives to overhaul veterans' benefits again to placate angry ex-soldiers
The Harper government plans further changes to its oft-maligned veterans charter, hoping to take the political sting out of complaints by ex-soldiers promising to campaign against them in the next election.
Franklin expedition ship found in Arctic ID'd as HMS Erebus video
The Franklin expedition ship found last month in the Arctic has been identified as HMS Erebus, Prime Minister Stephen Harper confirmed in the House of Commons today.
more »

Health »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Arts & Entertainment»

Residential school ballet, Going Home Star, opens in Winnipeg video
Going Home Star, a ballet based on a story by Joseph Boyden, opens Wednesday in Winnipeg.
Lena Dunham calls secrecy 'destructive' video
Lena Dunham's highly-anticipated book, Not That Kind of Girl, is out. The outspoken creator of Girls talks about keeping secrets and being a young woman with Q host Jian Ghomeshi.
Jimmy Kimmel is the web's most dangerous celebrity, McAfee says video
What do Jimmy Kimmel, Chelsea Handler and Justin Bieber and have in common? Security expects say searching their names could put your computer in danger.
more »

Technology & Science »

FireChat 'off-the-grid' messaging app: What you need to know
FireChat, an app that lets users chat without a cellular or internet connection, has been downloaded more than 100,000 times in Hong Kong amid mass pro-democracy protests. Here's what you need to know about it.
Franklin expedition ship found in Arctic ID'd as HMS Erebus video
The Franklin expedition ship found last month in the Arctic has been identified as HMS Erebus, Prime Minister Stephen Harper confirmed in the House of Commons today.
WWF’s Living Planet Report not all doom and gloom video audio
The World Wildlife Fund's report on the state of the global environment paints a pretty gloomy picture of a planet in decline. Still, the WWF says, "the challenge is not an insurmountable one." Here are six examples of how we can fix the problem.
more »

Money »

Is China willing to sacrifice Hong Kong's booming economy? video audio
Would China be willing to kill the golden goose that is Hong Kong just to crush democracy? Don Pittis argues China can save Hong Kong's prosperity and its democracy.
Housing market a bubble set to burst, investment expert says video
An Edmonton investment manager has a dire warning about the Canadian real estate market: a major correction is coming.
Keurig coffee sued for $600M by Ontario-based Club Coffee video audio
An Ontario coffee roaster and grinder is suing U.S. giant Keurig for anti-competitive behaviour, claiming it is keeping the price of single-serve coffee pods artificially high for consumers.
more »

Consumer Life »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Sports »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Blog Russell: The dangerous head games we play
It seems we can talk about injury prevention, rehabilitation, equipment improvements and sanctions for violent offenders in sport all we want. But until we get to the root problem, we'll continue to be plagued by devastating injury, most notably concussions, writes Scott Russell.
Analysis Ottawa Senators: 2014-15 NHL season preview
For the second straight year, high-scoring defenceman Erik Karlsson and the Ottawa Senators must move on from the departure of their captain and a franchise icon.
Blog Chick: Canadian women stage ‘huge’ win at basketball worlds
Canada Basketball has had a handful of big, meaningful wins before, and beating the No. 5-ranked Czech Republic at the FIBA world championship on Wednesday just adds to the list, writes CBC Sports basketball contributor John Chick.
more »

Diversions »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
more »