Health

Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Taking a guilt-free break

Comments (11)
By Peter Hadzipetros

Heat got you down? Maybe you've abandoned your exercise program as temperatures across the country tickled record highs?

If you have, and you're feeling a little guilty, don't worry. Your body may still be benefiting from what you were doing — even if you were barely breaking a sweat while you were moving.

A study published in the latest issue of The Journal of Applied Physiology suggests that a "modest amount of moderately intense exercise is the best way to lower the level of a key blood marker linked to higher risk of heart disease and diabetes."

That marker is triglycerides, the particles that carry fat around the body. Reducing your triglyceride level cuts your risk of heart disease and diabetes.

The researchers studied 240 middle-aged, sedentary people who were put into one of four groups:

  • Lots of intense exercise.
  • Less exercise but at a high intensity.
  • Less exercise at a moderate intensity.
  • No exercise at all.

The researchers found that triglyceride levels stayed low even two weeks after people in the study group were told to stop exercising.

But what really surprised them was what happened to the study participants who were put on an intense exercise program. Their triglyceride levels did not stay as low two weeks after they stopped exercising as the levels reached for people doing moderate exercise — like 30 minutes of walking every day.

What didn't surprise them was what happened to the group that did no exercise: over six months, they put on about one kilogram and added a centimetre or so to their waistlines. Doesn't sound like much — but keep that up for 10 years and you may be knocking on obesity's door.

The bottom line is that you may not need as much exercise as you thought in order to make big changes in your life. You don't have to slog through a 10 kilometre run when the humidex is touching 40 degrees and that new-fangled air quality health index is moving closer to 10.

The American Heart Association and the American College of Sports Medicine recently revised their exercise guidelines:

Do moderately intense cardio 30 minutes a day, five days a week.
Or
Do vigorously intense cardio 20 minutes a day, 3 days a week.
And
Do eight to 10 strength-training exercises, eight to 12 repetitions of each exercise twice a week.

The Public Health Agency of Canada recommends 60 minutes every day — but not necessarily all at once. By breaking it up into easily manageable chunks, getting enough shouldn't be much of a challenge.

Then maybe you wouldn't need to take to take a break from exercising and worry that you might be slipping back into that sedentary lifestyle.

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

This discussion is now Open. Submit your Comment.

Comments (11)

toomanycrayons

ON

Boy, nothing brings out the fetishists like exercise.

There is nothing dumber than breathing bad air.

No, wait, there's rigid schedules which have nothing to do with the physical/real world.

Thanks for the article.

Posted September 6, 2009 09:43 AM

Kathleen

Calgary

I am a Group Ex Instructor and Personal Trainer for a prestigious club in my area. In the past two months I have discovered what over-training and over-excessive intensive excercise means. I had been juggling my full time job along with teaching classes, clients and my personal life for over 2 years without giving my mind & body a break. Working out is my stress-relief and also helps me cope with life; however, we need to remember that our bodies need to rest & repair and taking the odd break is healthy and we need to smell the roses while we workout too! That means a less intense workout is just as good for us! Take it from me, it's a balancing act between burn-out and working out to stay healthy.

Posted September 5, 2007 10:00 AM

Jim

Timmins

I dont believe in becomming a hermit because of the weather. If you dont train your body in stress you will never be able to cope with that stress. I plan my weekly runs early in the week, and it is only my schedule that determines availability, not weather. It doesn't matter if that time of that day is hot, humid, or raining cats and dogs - I do it anyways. In the winter that might mean running in minus 20-30, but I get my mileage in no matter what. I am conscious of running style, and I make sure to avoid injury or dehydration depending on the conditions, and as far as I'm concerned that is more important than missing a day because its too hot or too cold. I'm turning 50 in 2008, and manage 30-50 km a week. On my non-running days, I might play a round of golf, go for a bike ride with my significant other, or go for a swim. The last thing you will find me doing is to get cooped up in a gym, or worse; in my living room. Catch me if you can.

Posted August 23, 2007 08:09 AM

LM

Lethbridge

I am 61 and retired. I have been a runner for the past 31 years and love doing it. I log about 40K a week. I also cycle and weight train. I worked a high stress management position for many years, but never have had problems with weight or BP. I have always had plenty of energy to work or play.
Now that I have more personal time, it is easier to keep my commitments to fitness. Like Lee, I hope to keep this up for a very long time!

Posted August 20, 2007 06:31 PM

Amanda

I am actually really happy to hear this, i play soccer and run track but outside of practise, if its too hot, I won't go out for a run. I don't feel its benificial if i burn out right away. I may take the dog for a short walk but the hot weather doesn't help the dog any either!

Posted August 20, 2007 09:38 AM

Lee McNaughton

I have exercised all my life (I'm 60). Included in this regime is a moderate amount of weight training. As I grow older, I notice that many older people have little strength in some important areas like arms -they can't pull themselves up from a chair. Weights are so easy and you can notice the benefits quickly. I find as I get older machines are the best - dial in the weight and do the exercise. I try to do 30 minutes a day - 3 times a week. I do 10 - 12 exercises, with reps like 15 - then 12 - then 10. I try to move quickly from exercise to exercise to also get a little cardio in as well. For me, this works. I intend to follow my routine until .... well you know... the pine box arrives!!

Posted August 8, 2007 02:00 PM

Ryan

Halifax

To the person in Vancouver:

It is my opinion, as a health and fitness professional that, yes, you should be doing some kind of strength training. The prime marker of aging is loss of skeletal muscle tissue. (~half a lb/ year) If there was only one reason to start strength training, this would be it. Maintaining existing muscle tissue, and possibly adding a bit more, will allow you to feel as great as you do now for as long as possible by retaining your functional capacity.

It is definitely worth looking into one on one instruction to learn how to do it safely and effectively. I would suggest being picky with who you choose. Look for an instructor with some kind of education beyond a personal training certification. (Kinesiology for example)

Posted August 8, 2007 12:11 PM

Lisa

I exercise just 4 times a week on my treadmill. I have done this EVERY week for the past 5 years. I try to work out Sun - Wed so that I finish my 4 treadmill workouts early in the week. If I miss one of those days, then I know I have the rest of the week to get my 4 workouts done. I am overweight because of bad eating habits, but my blood pressure is 110/75 and my pulse rate is good.

Posted August 8, 2007 10:03 AM

Need you help in Van

Vancouver

For the last 10 years or so, I have been walking every morning for 1hour and 15 minutes, 6 days a week before I go to work. Prior to that I was a daily swimmer. I am in a job in which I am constantly up and down from my desk all day sitting the longest stretch of no more than 10 minutes straight on any given day. I am in my 50's and feel great.
I have never done any strength training and anaerobic exercises.
Does anyone have any thoughts if I really should be doing some and any suggestions as to where I should start?

Posted August 5, 2007 11:07 PM

yvie

I consider myself a poster child for the moderate exercise movement.

I am now 46 and have been a regular exerciser for about 25 years.

I used to run. Now I don't like it because it's too much like work.

Most of the time I walk or cycle, about 5 days a week. I don't walk or bike particularly quickly, but I do it consistently, winter and summer.

I have no weight problems, normal bp and a pulse rate of an athlete. I have always attributed my good health to consistency rather than intensity. Oh, and because I don't overdo exercise, I love it!

Posted August 5, 2007 08:37 AM

Deb Johnson

Well, this is welcome news! Great for those like myself who hate the heat. I'd much prefer to break it up, with walks with the dog. Early morning, later afternoon, evening walks, killing two birds with one stone. Suits me just fine. :)

Posted August 4, 2007 09:31 AM

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

Post a Comment

Disclaimer:

Note: By submitting your comments you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that due to the volume of e-mails we receive, not all comments will be published, and those that are published will not be edited. But all will be carefully read, considered and appreciated.

Privacy Policy | Submissions Policy

Back of the Pack »

About the Author

Peter HadzipetrosPeter Hadzipetros is a producer for the Consumer and Health sites of CBC News Online. Until he got off the couch and got into long distance running a few years ago, he was a net importer of calories.

More from Peter Hadzipetros »

Recent Posts

Exercise, not 'guardian angels' key to avoiding falls
Peter Hadzipetros
Wednesday, July 29, 2009
For the love of it
Peter Hadzipetros
Tuesday, July 21, 2009
Keep on exercising
Peter Hadzipetros
Friday, May 29, 2009
Massage: not all it's cracked up to be?
Peter Hadzipetros
Friday, May 8, 2009
Sports drinks: playing with your brain
Peter Hadzipetros
Friday, April 17, 2009
Subscribe to this blog

Recent Comments

Boy, nothing brings out the fetishists like exercise....
Taking a guilt-free break
I am a Group Ex Instructor and Personal Trainer for a pre...
Taking a guilt-free break
I dont believe in becomming a hermit because of the weath...
Taking a guilt-free break
I am 61 and retired. I have been a runner for the past 31...
Taking a guilt-free break
I am actually really happy to hear this, i play soccer an...
Taking a guilt-free break

Archives

July 2009 (2)
May 2009 (2)
April 2009 (1)
March 2009 (1)
February 2009 (1)
January 2009 (1)
December 2008 (1)
September 2008 (1)
July 2008 (2)
June 2008 (2)
May 2008 (1)
April 2008 (2)
February 2008 (1)
January 2008 (2)
December 2007 (2)
November 2007 (4)
October 2007 (3)
September 2007 (3)
August 2007 (3)
July 2007 (4)
June 2007 (5)
May 2007 (3)
April 2007 (6)
March 2007 (3)
February 2007 (6)
January 2007 (7)
December 2006 (2)
November 2006 (3)
October 2006 (3)
September 2006 (4)
August 2006 (5)
[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

World »

Venezuela spiralling into chaos amid looting, militarized police
After the deadliest day in weeks of anti-government protest and looting, tensions remain high in Venezuela as state police departments are put under National Guard control.
France may catch populist wave in presidential voting
France is voting in the first round of a bitterly fought presidential election, crucial to the future of Europe and a closely watched test of voters' anger with the political establishment.
Global March for Science raises concern over Trump policies
Scientists and their supporters marched in hundreds of cities around the world Saturday, including over a dozen in Canada, protesting against proposed U.S. government funding cuts to scientific research and public rejection of established science such as climate change.
more »

Canada »

2 arrested in Edmonton dead toddler case video
Two people have been arrested in connection with the death of a toddler whose body was found in north Edmonton on Friday.
New With sun shining, floodwaters begin to recede west of Montreal
The floodwaters that forced hundreds from their homes in southwestern Quebec have begun to recede. Heavy rain earlier this week caused the Ottawa River to overflow, leading to forced evacuations in Rigaud, Que.
New New post-secondary sexual assault policies a start but fall short, experts say
Next month, British Columbia will become the second province in Canada with mandatory sexual assault policies in place at its universities — but some experts say while such policies are a good first step they are far from a perfect solution.
more »

Politics »

Transgender inmate hopes to make history with transfer to women's prison video
After nearly two decades of taunts, threats and physical abuse behind bars, Fallon Aubee hopes to become Canada's first federal inmate to be placed in a prison based on gender identity rather than genitalia.
Let's get going on NAFTA renegotiation, says Marc Garneau audio
The chair of Canada/US cabinet committee, Transport Minister Marc Garneau, says uncertainty over the future of NAFTA is hurting business on both sides of the border.
Analysis Polls show tight 4-way race in 1st round of French presidential vote
Though Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen are favoured, any two of the four top contenders could advance to the second round of France's presidential election — with potentially serious repercussions for Canada and the world.
more »

Health »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Arts & Entertainment»

Actress Erin Moran of Happy Days fame dead at 56
Erin Moran, the former child star who played Joanie Cunningham in the sitcoms Happy Days and Joanie Loves Chachi, died Saturday at age 56.
Photos Coachella 2017: The music, fashion and parties
Headliners such as Lady Gaga and Kendrick Lamar owned the stage at the music festival in Indio, Calif., which attracts thousands of people each year over two weekends. Famous faces in the crowd included Game of Thrones' Sophie Turner, Frieda Pinto and model Alessandra Ambrosio. The event wraps up this weekend.
James Cameron's Avatar sequel to be released in 2020
Avatar 2, one of four upcoming films in the franchise, will open in theatres Dec. 18, 2020.
more »

Technology & Science »

Global March for Science raises concern over Trump policies
Scientists and their supporters marched in hundreds of cities around the world Saturday, including over a dozen in Canada, protesting against proposed U.S. government funding cuts to scientific research and public rejection of established science such as climate change.
Blog A note of optimism on a day of worries: Bob McDonald
The very long list of woes affecting the Earth can generate a feeling of hopelessness and dread about the state of this unique blue planet we live on. But if hopelessness prevails, change will not happen.
Feature Happy Earth Day! Our home, seen from space
Today we celebrate Earth Day with a few pictures of our 'Blue Marble' as seen from space.
more »

Money »

Despite special regulations, edible entrepreneurs hope to take bite of Canada's marijuana market
Evidence from other legal jurisdictions suggests marijuana-infused foods could be hugely popular once Canada legalizes marijuana, but the federal government says it needs extra time to develop special regulations for edibles before they can be legally sold.
Bank of Canada governor 'happy' to see plan for GTA housing market
Measures to cool the housing market in the Greater Toronto Area have received a warm response from Canada's central banker, who said Saturday it should have some effect on runaway housing prices.
'I'm shaking my head': Hot Toronto housing market driving prices up in small town Ontario
Blame Toronto. The city's hot housing market is spilling over into some quiet Ontario towns, bringing higher home prices and unprecedented bidding wars.
more »

Consumer Life »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Sports »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Recap Oilers knock off Sharks, set up 2nd round date with Ducks video
Two breakaway goals less than a minute apart Saturday night proved to be the difference as the Edmonton Oilers defeated the San Jose Sharks 3-1 and advanced to the second round of the Stanley Cup playoffs.
Coming Up Watch the FINA Diving World Series video
Watch live action Sunday at 10 a.m. ET from the FINA Diving World Series event in Windsor, Ont.
Sprint Icons Donovan Bailey reveals his dream relay team video
With Saturday's IAAF World Relays in the Bahamas approaching, 1996 Canadian Olympic sprint and 4x100-metre relay champion Donovan Bailey unveils his dream relay team.
more »

Diversions »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
more »