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November 2006 Archives

Cracking the sports drink market

Seems big dairy really wants a piece of the lucrative sports drink market — a market that's worth somewhere close to $4 billion a year in North America.

Strong demand for sports drinks and bottled water have fuelled sales growth for companies like Coca-Cola and Pepsi — even while they sell less of their traditional carbonated drinks. Coke owns Powerade — which last year saw sales rise 28 per cent in the U.S. Pepsi started peddling Gatorade after it acquired Quaker Oats in 2001. At that time, Gatorade held more than 80 per cent of the sports drink market.

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Too much of a good thing?

The key for men to make it to 85 without relying on someone else to bathe, feed and dress them is to stay trim and active, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

There are other factors — including not smoking, easing up on the booze, having a strong grip and being married — but it's the exercise aspect that interests me.

Is it a case of the more you exercise the better your odds? Sort of like my grandmother's attitude to diet foods back in the 1960s. She figured if it said "diet" on the label, the more you ate, the more weight you would lose.

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Getting the message?

Statistics Canada is hinting that Canadians may be turning the corner in the battle of the bulge. A study released this week found that while we're still putting on weight — overall — we're not putting on as much as we used to.

Between 2000/01 and 2002/03, men between ages 18 and 64 plumped up by about 2.5 pounds. Women carried an extra 2.24 pounds on average. Over the next two years, we continued to add some weight — but substantially less (1.6 pounds for men and 1.25 pounds for women).

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