BROADCAST DATE : Feb 19, 2016

The Richard Oland Case: Murder in the Family

 

 

It was called the trial of the century in New Brunswick - - a confluence of celebrity, money and murder. Richard Oland of the Moosehead brewing family -- one of the richest, most powerful men in the region – was dead, bludgeoned in his office. Charged and convicted with the brutal killing, the victim’s son, Dennis Oland. Last week, Dennis Oland was sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 10 years in the 2011 killing.

It’s a case where many felt family influence and clout would prevail. Police were accused of fumbling the high-profile case and now there is an appeal. Bob McKeown investigates a tangled family tale that ended in murder – with many questions still unanswered.

  • The body of Richard Oland, 69, was discovered lying face-down in a pool of blood in his Saint John investment firm office on July 7, 2011
  • The Oland family is one of the most well-known families in New Brunswick and are the operators of Moosehead Brewery, though Richard left in 1981
  • He had suffered 45 sharp and blunt force injuries to his head, neck and hands
  • No weapon was ever found
  • His son, Dennis Oland, was the last known person to see him alive during a meeting as his office the night before
  • Oland, 48, is serving a life sentence with no change of parole for at least 10 years for the death of his father

MURDER IN THE FAMILY
February 19, 2016

Friends and neighbours are speaking out over the conviction of Dennis Oland in his father's murder.

"It was preposterous. The Dennis Oland that I know, and I know very well, is simply not capable of such a horrific act," said Larry Cain in the documentary that airs on Friday night.

The body of Richard Oland, 69, was discovered lying face down in a pool of blood in his Saint John investment firm office on July 7, 2011.

He had suffered 45 sharp and blunt force injuries to his head, neck and hands. No weapon was ever found.

His only son was the last known person to see him alive during a meeting at his office the night before.

It has been described as the trial of the century in New Brunswick.

Oland, 48, is serving a life sentence, with no chance of parole for at least 10 years for the death of his father.

During Oland's sentencing, many friends wrote letters of support in an effort to have his time in prison reduced.

In the documentary, some of those friends shared memories of the night Oland was found guilty of second-degree murder.

"Later that day we gathered at Dennis' lawyer's house," said Kelly Patterson.

"Anyway we gathered and we were in a fog. Totally stunned.  It was surreal, you couldn't really grasp that this had really happened."

For Cain, he said it is still difficult to deal with what has happened in the last five years.

"We were in shock for several days. Still … you just can't process it," he said.

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