host picture

| Bookmark and Share

Julie Van Rosendaal

Our food and nutrition guide Julie van Rosendaal brings us some Miami heat.







Click on read more for recipe.
Shrimp & Grits with a Fried Egg 2 cups water 1 cup milk 3/4 cup grits pinch salt 1 cup grated aged Gouda or white cheddar 2 Tbsp. butter salt and freshly ground pepper Shrimp: 1/2 lb. raw, peeled, tail-on shrimp 2 Tbsp. butter 2 Tbsp. olive oil 3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed 1 Tbsp. dry barbecue rub (optional) fresh Italian parsley, torn or chopped eggs, for frying (optional) In a medium saucepan, bring the water and milk to a simmer. Slowly whisk in the grits and add the salt; cook, whisking often over medium heat, for 5-10 minutes, or until thickened to the consistency of cream of wheat. Stir in the grated cheese and butter and season with salt and pepper. Set a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat and add the butter and oil. When the foam subsides, add the garlic and cook for a minute, then add the shrimp and sprinkle with barbecue rub. Cook, turning the shrimp as you need to, moving them around the pan, just until they turn opaque. Divvy the grits between shallow bowls and top them with shrimp. If you like, crack some eggs into the pan (as many as people you're feeding) and cook them sunny side up or over easy in the spicy butter in the pan. Place them alongside the shrimp and dribble any butter left in the pan overtop. Sprinkle with parsley and serve immediately. Serves 4-6. Pork Carnitas Pork shoulder is inexpensive and flavourful - you could also use flank steak, which tends to be more expensive but would also be delicious. olive or canola oil, for cooking 3 lb pork shoulder (roast or steaks) salt and pepper 1 Tbsp. cumin 1 head garlic, cloves separated, peeled and crushed 1/3 cup chopped cilantro stems 1 tsp. orange zest juice of an orange juice of half a lemon (about 1 1/2 Tbsp.) half a bottle of beer or cider (about 3/4 cup) fresh corn tortillas finely chopped onion, for serving chopped avocado, for serving fresh cilantro, for serving Preheat the oven to 300F. Set a heavy cast iron pot over medium-high heat and add a generous drizzle of oil. Brown the pork shoulder on all sides, sprinkling it with salt and pepper as it cooks, transferring steaks to a plate as you go if you're using them. Add the cumin and garlic and cook for another minute. Return all the browned pork to the pot and add the cilantro, orange zest and juice, lemon juice and beer. Cover and braise for 2 1/2-3 hours, turning the meat once if you think of it. Pull out any bones and shred the meat with two forks. Serve in fresh tortillas with avocado and cilantro. Serves lots. Shrimp & Grits Cheesy grits topped with spicy shrimp are real fast food - toss an egg on it too, while the pan's still hot. 2 cups water 1 cup milk 1 cup grits pinch salt 1 cup grated aged Gouda or white cheddar 2 Tbsp. butter salt and freshly ground pepper Shrimp: 1/2 lb. raw, peeled, tail-on shrimp 2 Tbsp. butter 2 Tbsp. olive oil 3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed 1 Tbsp. dry barbecue rub (optional) fresh Italian parsley, torn or chopped eggs, for frying (optional) In a medium saucepan, bring the water and milk to a simmer. Slowly whisk in the grits and add the salt; cook, whisking often over medium heat, for -- or until thickened to the consistency of cream of wheat. Stir in the grated cheese and butter and season with salt and pepper. Set a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat and add the butter and oil. When the foam subsides, add the garlic and cook for a minute, then add the shrimp and sprinkle with barbecue rub. Cook, turning the shrimp as you need to, moving them around the pan, just until they turn opaque. Divvy the grits between shallow bowls and top them with shrimp. If you like, crack some eggs into the pan (as many as people you're feeding) and cook them sunny side up or over easy in the spicy butter in the pan. Place them alongside the shrimp and dribble any butter left in the pan overtop. Sprinkle with parsley and serve immediately. Serves 4-6.

Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Submission Policy

Note: The CBC does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that comments are moderated and published according to our submission guidelines.