Find your ward and candidates

Use this interactive map to search for a location and view the candidates and an overview of the election issues for your ward. CBC Edmonton has also compiled full ward and councillor candidate profiles.

Posted: September 23, 2013

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Ward 11

Southeast Edmonton's Ward 11 is bordered by several major roads — Whyte Avenue to the north, Gateway Boulevard to the west, 50th Street to the east, with a chunk of industrial land east of 50th Street and north of Whitemud Drive. Its main residential composition, south of Whitemud Drive and a band of industrial estates, is Mill Woods, a collection of two-dozen neighbourhoods surrounded by industrial estates.

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Ward 12

Ward 12 makes up the extreme southeast corner of the city, south of Whitemud Drive and west of 50th Street. It comprises the eight eastside neighbourhoods of Mill Woods, plus the new developments of Silver Berry, Wild Rose to the east and south of the Anthony Henday ring road, including Charlesworth, Summerside and others. This is a ward of very young people -- one-quarter are under 20 years old, while one in eight is under 10, the highest proportion in the city. It is also diverse, with more than one in ten a non-Canadian, the second highest proportion in Edmonton.

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Ward 9

Ward 9 is a triangular shaped area comprising the extreme southwest of the city, bordered by natural features: the North Saskatchewan River to the west and north and the Whitemud and Blackmud Creek Ravines to the east. To the south is the Anthony Henday ring road, which has a several newer developments to the south on old farmland, including one of Edmonton's newest neighbourhoods, the Chappelle area. Ward 9 contains several of the wealthiest neighbourhoods in Edmonton, such as Bulyea Heights and Henderson Estates, and has the highest average neighbourhood income level of any ward. A mere one percent is unemployed, the lowest in the city.

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Ward 10

Ward 10 spans neighbourhoods to the west of Gateway Boulevard, with the Whitemud and Blackmud Creek Ravines forming the eastern border and just above the Anthony Henday ring road to the south. It is the area served best by the LRT, with one in five using transit as their main form of transportation -- the highest in the city. Travelling south on the LRT line, one passes plenty of variety: from the post-war neighbourhoods of Parkallen and Allendale, popular with young families wanting proximity to Whyte Avenue; past rental-heavy, ethnically diverse Empire Park; into higher-income Greenfield and Steinhauer, before settling in Blue Quill, an area increasingly popular with new Canadians and, since the LRT was expanded to Century Park, students.

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Ward 8

Ward 8 lies directly across the South Saskatchewan River from downtown, spanning from the southern arch of the river to the west, to the city limits in the east, with 72nd Avenue and Whyte (82) Avenue to the south. It is a densely populated ward that contains the University of Alberta, a campus of nearly 60,000 people (40,000 students and 19,000 staff/instructors), which means that much of the population is transient, and just over half its accommodations are rental. Unsurprisingly, Ward 8 has the highest proportion of its population in its 20s -- close to one-fifth. This large, young student base means appealing to this demographic is key to a councillor's success in this area.

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Ward 7

Ward 7 is an L-shaped boundary situated just to the northeast of downtown Edmonton. It lies east of 97th Street and is bordered on the south by the winding North Saskatchewan River. On the west side of the ward, the northern boundary is 144th Street. On the eastern portion, Yellowhead Trail is the boundary to the north. It is made up of several mature and low-income neighbourhoods, including Alberta Avenue, Cromdale and, further east, Abbottsfield, one of several areas that were part of the old coal mining town of Beverly, amalgamated with Edmonton in 1961. Ward 7 has the highest proportion of seniors of any ward.

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Ward 5

Ward 5 is tucked into the west end of the city, north of the river and south of Whitemud Drive and 87th Avenue. Income levels are high, with the average for nearly half its 22 neighbourhoods at $100,000 or more. It is the second-wealthiest ward in terms of average neighbourhood incomes. Recent tension in this ward has a lot to do with the proximity of the Anthony Henday ring road. After the province scrapped an exit into the Ormbsy Place neighbourhood, drivers have been cutting through that neighbourhood to get to the next exit, leading to outrage over increased traffic. In the Wedgewood and Cameron Heights neighbourhoods, noise from the Henday frustrates residents.

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Ward 6

Ward 6 spans 7.5 km east to west through downtown and encompasses some of the most diversity of any Edmonton ward. Average household income, for instance, swings from $32,773 in Central McDougall to $142,560 in Glenora. The ward contains the third highest ratio of non-Canadian citizens in the city. Overall, this is a ward of young people and transient people. Its proportion of people aged 25 to 29 is the highest in the city -- almost 10 percent, while it has the highest proportion of rented properties.

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Ward 4

The majority of the land mass of northeast Edmonton's Ward 4 is farmland, bordered to the south by the Anthony Henday ring road, Highway 37 to the north, the military base to the west, and the North Saskatchewan River to the east. Despite its rural composition, Ward 4 is in the top four of Edmonton wards in terms of population size, with almost 71,000 people living in neighbourhoods clustered around Clareview and Belvedere LRT stations. The ward has a population that is relatively young, with the second-smallest proportion of people 65 years old and over.

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Ward 3

Ward 3 represents the northernmost edge of the city, spanning approximately three kilometres to the east and west of 97th Street. The ward contains the highest ratio of baby-boomer homeowners in the city. It is a stable population, with 54 per cent having lived in their home for five years or more -- the highest proportion in the city by far. Its neighbourhoods are aging, with roads and sidewalks in need of upgrades. Present councillor Dave Loken says only one neighbourhood -- Kilkenny -- is targeted for full renewal of sidewalks and roads, but not until 2017.

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Ward 2

Northwest Ward 2 contains some of the biggest development projects in the city: the City Centre Airport's planned closure and transformation into a new neighbourhood, and expansion of the LRT to NAIT and beyond. During the last election campaign in 2010, the future of the City Centre Airport lands became a divisive issue, with a large but unsuccessful petition submitted to city council to force a plebiscite on keeping it open. Ward 2 contains several major roads -- Yellowhead Trail, St. Albert Trail and the Anthony Henday ring road -- and half the declared six candidates have identified potholes and road improvements as a major issue.

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Ward 1

Ward 1 encompasses the west end of the city, north of Whitemud Drive and 87th Avenue and west of 149th Street and 156th Street. More than half the ward's land space is industrial, although its population size is comparable to other wards. Average incomes vary widely among Ward 1 neighbourhoods, although not as varied as downtown's Ward 6. People tend to be older in Ward 1, with the highest proportion of the population in its 50s.

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