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Listen to an interview with director Andrew Gregg on CBC Radio's A New Day.

Read a review of the film by James Bawden.

Canada’s crime rate is at its lowest point in more than forty years. So why are we spending hundreds of millions of dollars to get tough on crime now? More prisons cells, tougher laws for parole, more mandatory minimum sentences: they are all now part of Canada’s high-cost justice system – and they are all ideas that failed in the United States. (see more crime stats)

Our criminal justice system is currently undergoing a radical rethink.   Where will it lead? Will the crime rate continue to fall as our prison population increases?  What is being done to prepare prisoners for life after jail?   These are some of the issues under consideration in an incisive new documentary that looks at where our criminal justice system is headed.  

As Canada builds 2700 new federal prison cells -- and strengthens laws that will keep those new cells full – is our government making us safer? Or is this simply a political move—one that ignores research and statistics? 

“Based on what we hear from the government, it sounds like crime is the most dire issue facing Canadians,” explains State of Incarceration filmmaker Andrew Gregg. “It’s striking to realize that the crime rate is as low as it is, yet we’re undergoing the largest prison expansion since the 1930s. I wanted to find out why.”

Texas prisonA Texas prison

Greg travelled to Texas, one of the most relentless “tough on crime” states in the US, to discover that they are actually closing prisons and investing heavily in programs to get convicts released. The crew then went to California, to see how their “three strikes” mandatory minimum sentence law virtually bankrupted the state and paralyzed the prison system by increasing capacity to a shocking 200%. “It made sense to us to go and look at what happened in the US because we are implementing ideas here that they have already tried there. Canadians essentially live just north of the world’s largest incarceration experiment. We wanted to see if we’ve learned anything from their experience.”

The film also tells the story of Lifeline, a federally funded program based in Windsor, Ontario, designed to help long-term convicts prepare for life on the outside. Lifeline won awards and was studied and copied by justice officials in other countries. It was even hailed as a success on The Department of Justice Canada’s own website, before its budget was abruptly cut. Lifeline is an example of what gets funded and what doesn’t in this time of flux for Canadian criminal justice. 

Peter MackayThe film features an exclusive interview with Justice Minister Peter Mackay

“It’s a very complex subject with new studies being released constantly. I was surprised to learn that adding more prisons doesn’t affect the crime rate,” says Gregg. “I wanted to make sure we had a large cross-section of voices on these issues so viewers hear from criminologists, wardens, community activists, academics, and government appointees like Kevin Page, the former Parliamentary Budget Officer, Howard Sapers the Correctional Investigator of Canada and Justice Minister Peter Mackay.

“We also talk to ex-cons and current prisoners, including a convicted multiple murderer who has spent 37 years in both US and Canadian prisons and has a lot to say about the view from inside.”

State of Incarceration is a searing, thought-provoking look at a highly contentious issue as our criminal justice system undergoes a major refit that may not be either effective or affordable, and might even be taking us backwards.  

Directed by Andrew Gregg for 90th Parallel Productions in association with CBC.

Credits (Click to expand)

Produced, Directed and Written by
ANDREW GREGG

Narrator
ANN-MARIE MacDONALD

Executive Producer
GORDON HENDERSON

Editor
BRUCE LAPOINTE

Director of Photography
RICK BOSTON

Sound Recordist
MICHAEL JOSSELYN

Production Manager
SUSANNE CUFFE

Original Music
BRUCE FOWLER

Additional Music
APM

Additional Photography
EDGAR VELEZ

Additional Sound Recordist
BRIAN MAIER

Associate Producers
RITA KOTZIA
ROMILLA KARNICK

Audio Mix
MIKE DUNCAN

Research
ANDREW GREGG
STUART HENDERSON
ROMILLA KARNICK

Visual Research
ELIZABETH KLINCK

Additional Audio Mix
SHANE DUNCAN

Online Editor/Colourist
DAN JOHNSTON

Archival Material

ARCHIVES/ QMI AGENCY
©BarbaraRies.com
CANNABIS CULTURE
CBC TV ARCHIVES SALES
CBC LICENSING
CABLE PUBLIC AFFAIRS CHANNEL INC. /
LA CHAÎNE D’AFFAIRES PUBLIQUE PAR CÂBLE INC. (CPAC)
THE CANADIAN PRESS/ SEAN KILPATRICK
THE CANADIAN PRESS/ ADRIAN WYLD
THE CANADIAN PRESS/ LARRY MacDOUGAL
COURTESY CNN
GETTY IMAGES
HOUSE OF COMMONS BROADCASTING
GLOBAL NEWS
KPCC.ORG
NBC UNIVERSAL ARCHIVES
© MANNY CRISOSTOMO/ SACRAMENTO BEE/ ZUMA WIRE
POND 5


Special Thanks

ERIC BALNAR
CORRECTIONAL SERVICES CANADA
THE FENBROOK INSTITUTION
GUELPH CORRECTIONAL CENTRE,
PROVINCE OF ONTARIO
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA, FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
THE BRENNAN CENTER FOR JUSTICE
THE TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE
STATE PRESERVATION BOARD, TEXAS
LYNDON B. JOHNSON SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS
THE TEXAS PRISON MUSEUM
THE CLEVELAND UNIT & THE GEO GROUP
CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
SAN QUENTIN PENITENTIARY
US NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
CONSERVATIVE POLITICAL ACTION CONFERENCE

Produced with the participation of

Canada Film or VIdeo Production Tax Credit
Ontario Media Development Corporation
Canada Media Fund
ISAN     
Canadian Federation of Musicians         
     




       

 


Produced by

.90th Parallet

In association with the
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

© 90th Parallel Productions Inc. 2014


For Doc Zone

Packaging Editor
KEVIN BARNETT

Associate Producer
GRIFFIN ONDAATJE

Unit Manager
SIBEL SAUNDERS

Associate Director
PETER LEE

Presentation Producer
DAVID GIDDENS

Production Manager
DAVID WILSON

Senior Manager
WILMA ALEXANDER

Senior Producer
LINDA LAUGHLIN

Executive Producer
Doc Zone
MICHAEL CLAYDON

Executive Director
Documentary Programming
MARK STAROWICZ

 

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