What's on DNTO: Apr. 17

Sit right back and you'll hear a tale... or several, as we look at the power of storytelling this week on a two-hour show. A two-hour show.


What makes your best story your best story? Dakshana Bascaramurty will tell us her "dining-out" story - a terrifying tale of a cotton candy machine, mild sunstroke, and a quick trip to the hospital - and explain why it's her "signature piece."


A flat tire, guys with guns, and an active volcano. We'll find out how Ruth Shead's horoscope led to a once in a lifetime tale.


Here at DNTO, we like to say "everyone's got a story." 'Cause it's true. So if your life was a movie, what kind of story would it be? Sook-Yin takes her mic to the street to find out.


We've all met someone who knows how to spin a good yarn. But telling stories is more than just pure entertainment - it can be a very powerful tool. Rachel Sanders explains how storytelling can win people over and help get you what you want.


We like it when people share their stories - but comedian Candy Palmater may be guilty of "oversharing" one about her mom. She'll tell us how her family reacted when she told a potentially embarrassing story about her ma onstage.


Why is it that so many important messages are wrapped up in those sometimes-cryptic stories we call "parables?" Sook-Yin will talk with Rabbi Jordan Cohen about the role of storytelling in religious matters.


Every now and then, people will "embellish" their stories a bit. Sometimes, they're called "lies." So what happens when your "embellished story" runs amok? Sarah Meehan-Sirk will tell us her story.


Buck 65 - a.k.a. CBC Radio 2 host Rich Terfry - will come by to tell us about his new album/storytelling project, "100 Story Building," and to play us a tune live-in-studio.


"Did I tell you about the time....?" Clare Lawlor gets the story behind why we tell the same tales over and over and over again.


A great story can get you out of a sticky spot... but it can just as easily get you into one. Sook-Yin heads to the street for your stories of stories that helped, and stories that hurt.


Professional storytellers are particularly good at using stories to help them in tricky circumstances. Take Ruth Christie. She's a Cree storyteller who worked at Lower Fort Garry, a National Historic Site near Winnipeg. It was there that she grew close with a co-worker who, she later learned, was deeply affected by a story she told one day. She'll explain why.


Storytelling has a particular power in aboriginal cultures where, for centuries, it's been a way of uniting communities and passing knowledge from one generation to the next. So what happens when traditional native storytelling collides with new ways of telling stories? We'll talk with filmmaker Loretta Todd about combining traditional storytelling with modern technology.


The Winnipeg school where Marc Kuly teaches is made up of immigrants and refugees from Africa, Asia and the Middle East, plus Aboriginal and white kids. But Marc noticed that these different groups of kids hardly ever talked to each other. So he started an after-school program with a pretty simple goal: get kids together, tell stories, and see what happens. He'll explain why "The Storytelling Class" had some surprising lessons for him. (And if you're interested in seeing the documentary The Storytelling Class, you can find out how to get a copy by e-mailing the filmmakers - John Paskievich and John Whiteway - here.)


And here's this week's playlist:


Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings - "Better Things"
The Greatest Explorers In the World - "Hide and Seek"
The Be Good Tanyas - "Ootischenia"
Slick Rick - "Children's Story"
Girls In Trouble - "Hunter/The Bee Lays Her Eggs"
Buck 65 - "indestructible Sam" (live in studio)
Arctic Monkeys - "Riot Van"
Christa Couture - "Sad Story Over"
Elisapie Isaac - "Turning My Back"
Mighty Popo - "Karire"

 

Comments are closed.