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Americas: June 2011 Archives

June 30 & July 3: from Israel - Colombia - Berlin - Democratic Republic of Congo - Agra, India

U.S. President Richard Nixon and Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir (with Henry Kissinger) agreed in 1969 that Israel would adopt a policy of "ambiguity" about whether it had nukes. (Photo/Nixon Library) 

Israel has nukes, but says little about them, says a controversial Israeli author, here to reveal what his government won't.  

The story of Kidnap Radio in Colombia, where so many people are held hostage, there's a program just for their families, and our correspondent's father was one of them. 

A cultural quandry in Germany, where life threatens to limitate art in an East Berlin landmark.   

Then, the best-laid plans can't prevent our our correspondent getting his seat pinched on an Indian passenger train. 

And, the message in the music of the Congo's Clever Boys.


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Haiti's disabled: can it be cruel to be kind?

Mike Landry helps carry a former patient to her home. But is it her new "prison"? Photo/Fiona Stephenson

When the earthquake ravaged Haiti, the world tried to help.  But it remains a country of damaged homes, and damaged people. 

That's been troubling Mike Landry.

He answered Haiti's call, treating victims with spinal cord injuries. 

He's a Canadian physiotherapist, a professor at the University of Toronto.  And a frontline kind of guy with 15 years' experience in global rescue missions.

It's been his life's work. You'd think he'd be happy.  Instead, he's wracked with guilt and doubts.

Landry returned to Haiti, to see how the people he treated are doing. And to deal with the nagging questions his inner voice is asking.

He lets Dispatches evesdrop on that voice, as he searches for answers amid Haiti's fragments and the faces of those he cares for.

 Listen to Mike's dispatch

The June 24 Dispatches program and podcast 

Mike Landry is a physical therapist, a professor at the University of Toronto, and a scientist at the Toronto Rehab Institute. His experience with emergency missions include Bosnia, Kosovo, Guatemala, Sri Lanka and Haiti.

After we first aired his story, he found himself in the midst of a growing debate. Many told him the same problems confront Canadians who can't get the rehabilitation care they need. So he's now working on a documentary film grappling with the issues raised by forgotten survivors with broken bodies. 

What do you think? Is Mike being too hard on himself or right to question the way we respond to a global crisis? We'd like your thoughts. Email dispatches@cbc.ca.

June 23 & 26: from Port-au-Prince, Haiti - El Paso, Texas - the Balkans - Dublin, Ireland - Oakland, California

Mike Landry helps carry a former patient to her home. But is it her new "prison"? Photo/Fiona Stephenson

A doctor's lament for the injured of Haiti's earthquake; "By saving them, did we condemn them to suffer?" 

How did the U.S. war on terror miss the man who tried to kill Castro. Just clumsy? Or just convenient?

Why hundreds of sham marriages are taking place in Ireland and there's nothing police can do about it.

How an American school menu got "nuggetized" and Oakland, California became a "food desert."

And the old Discovery Channel come-on.  

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June 16 & 19: from Gudvangen, Norway - India - Dakar, Senegal - the Balkans - Guca, Serbia

Enok Alfson (facing camera) and Hordtur Bardtal locked in a shoulder grip in the Norwegian sport of Glima. Photo/Nacha Raman.

The angry mission of Sampat Pal, confronting a culture that abuses women in India.

In Senegal, they say you gotta "eat the chilis before you get the honey."  And female cabbies eat a lot of chilis.

A small matter of the missing: a new book documents the quest to identify the Balkans' war dead with DNA.

Then, the sweet sound of celebration and a sour note of nationalism as brass bands gather in Serbia. 

And, going berserk with the new Vikings of Norway.

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June 9 & 12: from Cairo - Venezuela - Port-au-Prince, Haiti - Jerusalem - India

Germaine Villeceant Excellente stands in front of her house, which she says was burned by peasants in a dispute over land rights. Photo/Connie Watson

In India, a midnight wedding, a five-year-old bride. Why child marriage persists.

Egypt's unfinished revolution. How six months have soured the public mood. 

In Venezuela, the state takeover of private land provides some surprises.

Jerusalem's reach: our departing Middle East correspondent reflects on the never-ending story.

Your land or your life: the murderous row over property rights in Haiti.

And, the gecko effect. Our little program triggers weird science.

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Law catches up to El Salvador military men

The 1989 killings were planned by some of El Salvador's top military leaders, says Spain, which is now pursuing them in the courts.   Photo/Luis Romero-AP

Atrocity in El Salvador: Rick MacInnes-Rae remembers, and so does a Spanish court

"The law can be maddening and slow. But on balance, it's been a good week for the law."

 Rick's essay

Find out more about the June 2 episode of Dispatches