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June 21 & 24: the last Dispatches

From our correspondents around the world...

 

The crew at Dispatches preparing the final show: (from left: Alan Guettel, Rick MacInnes-Rae, Nima Shams, Steve McNally, Alison Masemann, and Dawna Dingwall). 

This week -  we say good-bye.

It's our last program but we're going out with boats, baboons, and a bang.

We'll touch on some of the stories we've brought you over the years, some of the places we've been, and some of the strange and sublime people we put into your radio.

Along the way, we'll hear some of the moments that stopped us in our tracks. And hear some untold stories from our our correspondents.

We saved the best for last. 

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June 7 & June 10: from Italy - Amsterdam - Cairo - Bosnia - San Agustin, Cuba

From our correspondents around the world...

 

The enduring image from 1992 of the Bosnian war, taken when Ed Vulliamy and Independent Television News uncovered the existence of concentration camps in Trnopolje, above, Omarska and Keraterm. Vulliamy argues the startling revelations failed to bring the horrors, or the war, to a close. (Photo: Reuters)

Why Italy illegally walled off the sea to would-be refugees and sent them to certain abuse in Libya.

Dining out on a country specializing in famine. There's more than kimchi at a North Korean-themed restaurant.

Speaking of menus, there's a celebrity cook on Egyptian TV pitching comfort food for an uncomfortable economy.

Then, a Bosnian memoir from a correspondent seething about the perils of the Balkan region's unresolved history.

And from Cuba, how to get along with your neighbours when you're a temperamental artist and your neighbours are the Castros.

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Child "bomberitos" on Peru's most dangerous highway


Peru's Bomberitos to the rescue

Bomberito means "little fireman" in Spanish. In the Andes Mountains of Peru groups of them use their homemade carretas  to help stranded motorists and truckers along the highway.  The tips they earn help support their families. 

 Hevert (left) was a bomberito as a kid, helping rescue stranded motorists and victims of disasters.  They get their carretas up the steep highway through the Andes by attaching ropes, or just their hands, to passing transport trucks.  (Photos: Romi Burianova)

The photo that started it (below). Filmmaker Quincy Perkins saw this picture of two Bomberitos -- kids on their own in the mountains of Peru who make their way to mountain accidents and disasters. Our Dispatches contributor went with him to the Amazon valley as he made a film about them (Photo/StefanSonntag) 

It was one of those dinner party stories that sticks in your head. A rumour about kids racing homemade carts high in the Andes, acting as first responders during accidents and disasters.

They have a catchy name. They're said to do dangerous work in a dangerous region.

But are they real?  For Dispatches contributor Lori Chodos and a colleague, the voyage to find out was a story in itself.

 Lori's documentary

May 31 Dispatches

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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May 31 & June 3: from Kabul, Afghanistan - Lima, Peru - Florence, Italy - Hong Kong - Mumbai, India

From our correspondents around the world...

The photo that started it. Filmmaker Quincy Perkins saw this picture of two Bomberitos -- kids on their own in the mountains of Peru who make their way to mountain accidents and disasters. Our Dispatches contributor went with him to the Amazon valley as he made a film about them.  (Photo/Stefan Sonntag)

There's no fire department, no auto club between the Andes and the Amazon. Just feral kids in homemade carts. Meet the Bomberitos of Peru.

The threat left behind. NATO troops leave Afghanistan but their unexploded shells will wage a protracted war on civilians. 

Why Hong Kong's superiority complex is turning into an identity crisis, 15 years after its handover to China. 

Italy's doleful demographic.  The birth rate's so low, schools are being turned into old age homes.  

And, inner-city Mumbai might look like a slum, but the land's worth a fortune to the crafty residents waiting for a developer's payday.

 

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May 24 and May 27, 2012: from Florence - Uganda - The Seychelles - Iraq

From our correspondents around the world...

 

Tour participants in Florence eat gelato topped with aged balsamic vinegar, a uniquely Italian treat. (Photo: Luigi Fraboni)

How does a hairdresser recruited for work in Dubai, wind up slaving for the U.S. military in a war zone in Iraq? We look at the plight of those known as "The Invisible Army."

In Uganda you can inherit a wife, marry more than one, and beating them isn't much of a crime. And changing that is proving problematic.

Then, a young award-winning reporter on shoe leather, social media and his first time in a free-fire zone.

And, Florentine steak, well-aged parmeggiano, and an egg-rich gelato to die for. How to find the best food in Florence.

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May 10 & 13, 2012: from Damascus, Syria - Munich, Germany - Sao Paolo, Brazil - Alabama - Amsterdam, The Netherlands - Port-au-Prince, Haiti

From our correspondents around the world...

 

Alabama has America's toughest laws aimed at undocumented immigrants. It makes the lives of Hispanics so hard they are "self deporting", even if they are not illegal. The approach has also had an impact on Alabama citizens, many of whom have been drawn into the state's war on undocumented immigrants. (AP Photo/John Amis)

The shifting conflict in Syria. From stand-and-fight to guerilla warfare and a cry for outside help.

The German locomotive hopes to pull Europe's flailing economies out of trouble. But there's a ghost in that machine.

In Brazil, David Rocha makes garbage instruments. Or rather, instruments from garbage. That's why they sound so good.

Illegal immigrant, deport thyself. How an experiment in immigration went wrong in Alabama.

Hotels aren't in the charity business, so why would the Red Cross want into the hotel business, in Haiti?

And from the Netherlands, a cafe where you don't pay for the food. We take repast in a restaurant for these recessionary times.

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