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June 21 & 24: the last Dispatches

From our correspondents around the world...

 

The crew at Dispatches preparing the final show: (from left: Alan Guettel, Rick MacInnes-Rae, Nima Shams, Steve McNally, Alison Masemann, and Dawna Dingwall). 

This week -  we say good-bye.

It's our last program but we're going out with boats, baboons, and a bang.

We'll touch on some of the stories we've brought you over the years, some of the places we've been, and some of the strange and sublime people we put into your radio.

Along the way, we'll hear some of the moments that stopped us in our tracks. And hear some untold stories from our our correspondents.

We saved the best for last. 

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June 7 & June 10: from Italy - Amsterdam - Cairo - Bosnia - San Agustin, Cuba

From our correspondents around the world...

 

The enduring image from 1992 of the Bosnian war, taken when Ed Vulliamy and Independent Television News uncovered the existence of concentration camps in Trnopolje, above, Omarska and Keraterm. Vulliamy argues the startling revelations failed to bring the horrors, or the war, to a close. (Photo: Reuters)

Why Italy illegally walled off the sea to would-be refugees and sent them to certain abuse in Libya.

Dining out on a country specializing in famine. There's more than kimchi at a North Korean-themed restaurant.

Speaking of menus, there's a celebrity cook on Egyptian TV pitching comfort food for an uncomfortable economy.

Then, a Bosnian memoir from a correspondent seething about the perils of the Balkan region's unresolved history.

And from Cuba, how to get along with your neighbours when you're a temperamental artist and your neighbours are the Castros.

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May 24 and May 27, 2012: from Florence - Uganda - The Seychelles - Iraq

From our correspondents around the world...

 

Tour participants in Florence eat gelato topped with aged balsamic vinegar, a uniquely Italian treat. (Photo: Luigi Fraboni)

How does a hairdresser recruited for work in Dubai, wind up slaving for the U.S. military in a war zone in Iraq? We look at the plight of those known as "The Invisible Army."

In Uganda you can inherit a wife, marry more than one, and beating them isn't much of a crime. And changing that is proving problematic.

Then, a young award-winning reporter on shoe leather, social media and his first time in a free-fire zone.

And, Florentine steak, well-aged parmeggiano, and an egg-rich gelato to die for. How to find the best food in Florence.

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May 17 & 20, 2012: from Zimbabwe - Kyiv, Ukraine - Beijing

From our correspondents around the world...

 

A member of the Ukrainian women's rights group FEMEN attacks the UEFA Cup in Kiev.  FEMEN says the Euro 2012 soccer tournament markets Ukraine's women to sex tourists.  (Photo: Reuters/ GlebGaranich)

From Zimbabwe, a foreign photographer emerges from jail telling of political tyranny, sadistic guards, and a first-hand fear of the lost freedoms he was sent to cover.

In Ukraine, a political protest that takes its top off. Half-naked women take to the streets saying it's their way of struggling for gender equality.

And from the vaults, Visions Of Joanna: the story of a picture that sent a man in China on a twelve-year quest.

And, we'll re-visit The Tree of Forgetfulness as author Alexandra Fuller recounts her memoir of family madness and colonialism in Africa.

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Peace without justice in Liberia

Comfort Tokpah, 50, lost her husband and brother in Liberia's civil war and was forced to marry a child soldier. (Photo: Bonnie Allen)

Peace without justice in Liberia

Later this month, we'll hear a verdict in the case of the first African Head of State ever tried for war crimes.

Charles Taylor, a former President of Liberia, faces 11 counts for crimes he allegedly committed in neighbouring Sierra Leone.

They include murder and rape, and recruiting child soldiers

Remarkably enough, neither he -- nor anyone else -- faces any charges for triggering a war in his own country, which killed 1/4 million Liberians.

And now compels the innocent to live side-by-side with people guilty of committing atrocities against them. Dispatches contributor Bonnie Allen tells us two of those stories.

Listen to Bonnie's documentary

And a cruel footnote to that story: Alhaji Kromah, the former rebel leader in charge of the state broadcaster where Moses works, just got a new, more important, government job.

The President's appointed him an Ambassador-at-large in the Foreign Ministry. Observers say it likely means his prospects for prosecution are even more distant. But on the upside, it means Moses won't have to look at him every day.

The April 12 Dispatches program
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April 12 & April 15, 2012 - from Libya - Ganta, Liberia - Montreal - Paris

From our correspondents around the world...

 

A man points to the place where a bomb exploded. The target was a UN convoy in Benghazi, Libya. The attack reinforces concerns about instability in Libya, since the overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi. (Photo: REUTERS/Esam Al-Fetori)

Remember Libya? The one before Syria. Some Libyans think we've forgotten and it's helping tip the country into chaos.

If a neighbour killed your kin and went unpunished, you'd have an idea what it's like in Liberia, where victims of war crimes live in peace without justice.

And from the archives, we strut with The Society of Revellers and Elegant People. Of course they're French. French-African.

Then, as cholera makes a comback in Haiti, a Canadian author tells why it's poised to become the quintessential disease of our time.

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