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Okanagan fruit slim pickings this summer

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Orchardists say Okanagan cherries are slow to ripen this season, and too much rain is splitting the fruit skins. (Julie Kertesz/Wikimedia Commons)

Fruit growers in the Okanagan say severe summer storms have caused unprecedented damage to their crops, dashing their hopes of a bumper year for cherries and other fruits this summer.

Earlier this month, Daybreak spoke with Oliver orchardist, Greg Norton, who estimated he'd already lost millions of dollars worth of cherries, after a suprise hailstorm.

Now, many cherry varieties are ripe for the picking but Mother Nature has been washing the Okanagan landscape with rain and wind storms, leaving some parts of the Okanagan worse off than others.

Rick Machiel is a cherry and apple grower in Oliver.
Leo Gebert helps runs St Hubertus Winery, and
Tom Davison is the owner of Davison orchards in Vernon and grows a variety of veggies and fruits, including nectarines, pears, apples and peaches.

Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with all three farmers to gauge where their crops are at, as we near the end of July.
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