host picture

  |
Bookmark and Share

Lights out for Nelson's free porchlight program

450px-The_Church_of_St_Andrew,_Stewton_-_geograph.org.uk_-_624968.jpg
(Dave Hitchborne via Wikimedia Commons)
The City of Nelson has passed a new bylaw to protect it's citizens from a potentially deadly hazard.

Their porch lights.

Back in the early 1900's the city implemented a program that let homeowners run their porch lights free of charge. They were wired separately from the rest of the home... and turned out to be a system that could also be adapted for other uses.

It wasn't uncommon for homeowners and their kids to get creative and try to tap the light socket for free power.
   
Author Kenneth Morrow grew up in the area during the depression and wrote a book about it. His autobiography, A Boyhood in Nelson, describes just how useful he and his brother Bob found the free porch light service to be.

In this segment, Daybreak host Chris Walker reads an excerpt from the book, where Ken describes the finishing touches made to their home made hockey rink.

Then, he speaks with Nelson mayor John Dooley who says the city's quite concerned about the estimated 180 porch lights running on the old system, and explains how they're trying to figure out a way to fix them.
 
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Submission Policy

Note: The CBC does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comments, you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that comments are moderated and published according to our submission guidelines.