host picture

August 2012 Archives

Bookmark and Share

George Abbott says goodbye to politics

resampled_GeorgeAbbott-Shuswap_resized.jpg
B.C. Education Minister, George Abbott.

Critics are calling the BC Liberal party a sinking ship. The party itself says it's a a fresh start. As of August 31, 10 MLA's including three cabinet ministers have nnounced they are not seeking reelection. Another one crossed the floor and is sitting as a provincial conservative. Education Minister and Shuswap MLA George Abbott is one of the retirees. He's a four-term Liberal who ran for the party leadership last year. He had a goodbye chat with Daybreak host, Chris Walker.

 

 

Download Flash Player to view this content.

 

 

Bookmark and Share

Taking stock in Johnsons Landing

J-car.JPG
The mudslide that hit Johnsons Landing, B.C., on July 12, 2012, left a wide swath of destruction. (Bob Keating/CBC)
Seven weeks ago, a huge landslide roared down a mountainside and through remote Johnsons Landing, north of Nelson. Four people were killed instantly - and the community was literally cut in half by a mountain of debris. Much of Johnsons Landing is still considered a disaster area - a 'no go' zone for the public with security posted along the only road. Seven weeks ago, our reporter Bob Keating was one of the first on the scene. He recently returned to Johnsons Landing to see how people are coping. Here's what he heard:
 
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Trying to get into the B.C. Liberal caucus

Lib logo2.jpg
The B.C. Liberals are in need of some new blood after a string of cabinet ministers announced they won't be running in the next election.

The B.C. Liberal exodus is on. Multiple hihg profile MLAs and cabinet ministers have announced they will not be running in the next election. But as some get ready to leave the Liberal caucus, others are trying to get in. Daybreak host, Chris Walker, spoke with Mark Ziebarth. He's in the running for the B.C. Liberal nomination in Penticton.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Teen marijuana use may cause permanent intelligence drop

toke.jpg
Parents who think that their kids marijuana habit makes them less intelligent now have some research to back them up.

A new study finds that regular cannabis users under the age of 18 suffered an irreversible drop in IQ.
The study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It followed 1000 people for 20 years. The study controlled for other factors, including alcohol and tobacco use, mental illness, and education level.

Daybreak host, Chris Walker, sat down with Zach Walsh to discuss the study.  He's an assistant professor of psychology at UBC Okanagan and
a clinical psychologist who's involved in several studies looking at marijuana.

The study is posted here.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Columbia Valley restaurants looking for workers

Some restaurants in the Columbia Valley just can't find the staff they need, despite high unemployment. Daybreak host, Chris Walker talked about this paradox with Susan Smith of Invermere. She's the executive Director of the Columbia Valley Chamber of Commerce.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Making music part of everyday school

Music-Notex-psd22235.jpg
Elementary students in West Kelowna could be bringing different kinds instruments into math class next week. Sure, they'll have a compass and a protractor. But they might also have a fiddle. George Pringle Elementary has received a $45,000 grant to incorporate music into everyday schooling. Daybreak host, Chris Walker sat down and chatted with principal,  John McMahon.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Kelowna's Garrett Hickling to carry Canadian flag in London

Garett Hickling.jpg
Kelowna wheelchair rugby player, Garrett Hickling, is Canada's Paralympic flag bearer. (Photo courtesy of Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)
Wheelchair rugby player Garett Hickling will have the honour of carrying Canada's flag into the Olympic Stadium at the 2012 Paralympic Games. The day before the big event, Daybreak host Chris Walker caught up with Garrett's dad, John Hickling.

Download Flash Player to view this content.




Bookmark and Share

Mount Revelstoke's revered meadow

Revelstoke pansy.JPG
(Contributed by Greg Walker)

Mt. Revelstoke is renowned for its sub-alpine meadow. You get there by driving up the Meadows in the Sky Parkway.  And, at this time of year, it's a bloomin' extravaganza. But some residents who have spent a lot of time there over the years, think they're witnessing a waning of the posies. Daybreak host, Chris Walker spoke with well-known botanist George Scotter.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Developer yanks Peachland proposal... again.

**UPDATE** As of Wednesday morning, Steve Allison and TNI Network say their development will NOT have a final reading before council, and will NOT be seeking a development permit. In an email to CBC, Mr. Allison writes "There is no step left for me other than to start all over again.  I'll take a few months to recharge myself, fully explore all my options, and then decide in the New Year where I go from here, both with respect to my proposed building and my companies' future in this town."

worman.jpg4

Last week, a developer planning a new building along the Peachland waterfront abruptly withdrew his development application. But this morning, there's confusion about whether the proposal is, in fact, back before council.

Steve Allison says he's frustrated by two last-minute changes made by city hall. The development had already passed three readings at council. Public comments received by council were largely in favour of the project. And so, the fourth and final reading was set for Wednesday.

Daybreak host sat down with Steve Allison in his Peachland office.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Chris also spoke with the mayor of Peachland, Keith Fielding.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Chris also spoke with Dora Stewart of the Peachland Residents Association. 

Download Flash Player to view this content.




Bookmark and Share

News:

Pines Bible Camp ready to reopen after fatal windstorm



The Pines Bible Camp in Grand Forks didn't expect to re-open until next summer, after it was forced to close following a violent wind storm on July 20th.

The storm took the life of an 11 year old, who was inside one of the cabins crushed by a tree.

With the death and all the damage, the camp faced the difficult task of both rebuilding the physical structures and healing emotionally.

The plan was to shut down for the rest of the year, but now things have changed says Richard Friesen, program director for the Pines Bible Camp.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News:

2012 last year for Penticton Ironman triathalon

Download Flash Player to view this content.


This weekend marks the Ironman Triathlon's 30th anniversary in Penticton.

And this year's race will be its last.

The race's director has given up control of the event, and for the past two weeks Penticton city council had been deliberating about whether to buy the licensing rights to the Ironman.

But on Thursday, the city announced it's going in a different direction.

Starting next summer, the Ironman will be replaced by an event called the Challenge Family Triathlon.

The Challenge Family runs a series of 12 triathlons, mostly in Europe and the Penticton race will be its first North American event.

Felix Walchshoefer is the Challenge Family's CEO, and Daybreak host Chris Walker reached him in Penticton.
Download Flash Player to view this content.


The Challenge looks like the same race, with identical swim, bike and run distances, but  Ironman loyalists might not agree.

Sharon Lonergan of Kelowna has complete nine Ironman triathalons, seven 7 of them in Penticton.

She says her race this weekend will mark the end of an era.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Work's a circus: the life of Cirque's production manager

IMG.jpg
Performers go over their act before opening night at Quidam in Kelowna (Gillianne Richards/CBC)
Growing up, Sheldon Abel spent his Sundays on the rink in Revelstoke, B.C.

The hockey player developed a few other skills as well including carpentry and marketing at BCIT.

But when the call came for a shot at a lucrative career Sheldon flipped for the chance. He traded his ball cap for a top hat and joined Cirque du Soleil.

The Quebec-based company is in Kelowna this week, with the show Quidam, and so is Sheldon as the Production Stage Manager for the North American tour of the show.

Daybreak's Gillianne Richards goes behind the scenes at Cirque de Soleil's production of Quidam, to learn how a hockey boy from Revelstoke came to manage one of the biggest traveling acts in North America and what it takes to run off with the circus.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

B.C. spider hunters uncovering new high altitude species



People who fear spiders may not want to hear this little factoid: here in B.C. there are probably a couple hundred species of spider we don't even know about.

That's on top of the 800 species we do know about.

There are undiscovered crawly things under rocks, leaves and branches everywhere especially high up in the mountains.

And that's exactly where we sent out Kootenay reporter Bob Keating - up in the alpine looking for spiders.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News:

B.C. cherry growers consider trade action against U.S. counterparts

178930904_e2202d3674_z.jpg
Growers in the Okanagan can expect a market price of about 40 cents/lb for their cherries this year. (Contributed by: Rachel Andrew/Flikr)

It's been a tough summer for B.C.'s cherry growers. It's been a bumper crop but prices have plummeted, in many cases below the cost of production.

Some growers are leaving their fruit on the trees, rather than pay to have them picked and shipped.

Many think a glut of cheap cherries from Washington are to blame and growers in the Okanagan are holding emergency meetings as they plot their strategy.

Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with the general manager of the B.C. Fruit Growers' Association, Glen Lucas.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Chefs-in-training learn for Kelowna culinary masters

li-fruit-veg-620-istock.jpg
(iStock)
This year, the Canadian Culinary Federation launched a new program for chefs-in-training across Canada. For the first time, Junior members of the federation could apply to take part in a chef exchange program

The Okanagan is hosting the first group of exchange student chefs. Four culinary up-and-comers from different corners of the country are in town training with local chefs.

The idea behind the exchange is to introduce chefs to different foods and cooking styles from various regions.

Kim Knourek is in her second year apprenticeship under a chef in Regina, Saskatchewan, and spoke with Daybreak host, Chris Walker.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Penticton triathelete will do Ironman after near-fatal crash

Desktop30.jpg
(Above) Janelle Morrison in hospital on December 4, 2010 after her car accident. (Below) Janelle Morrison back on her bike in 2011 (Contributed by: janellemorrison.com)

Two years ago, professional athlete Janelle Morrison was hooked up to a life support machine and much of her body was broken.

Doctors didn't know if she would live -- let alone walk again.

But this weekend, Janelle will be doing a lot more than walking.

She'll be in Penticton, competing in her first full Ironman since the car accident that almost killed her.

She spoke to Daybreak host, Chris Walker from her home in Penticton. 
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News:

Pro-life flag will not fly at Kelowna City Hall

mi-120817-prolife-flag-kelowna.jpg
The controversial blue, white, and red flag depicts three figures and the word "pro-life" in capital letters. (Kelowna Right to Life)
Unless it bears a maple leaf, the British Columbia crest or the city's logo, no flags will be flown over Kelowna's city hall.

That was decided by council Monday after an anti-abortion group lobbied to have their "pro-life" flag flown as a courtesy flag.

The city had a policy that allowed groups to fly courtesy flags for designated events, but not anymore.

Kelowna city councillor Luck Stack explains why, to Daybreak host, Chris Walker.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News:

Penticton MLA Bill Barisoff won't run again

hi-bc-120801-speaker-bill-barisoff.jpg
Penticiton MLA Bill Barisoff says he will not run again in the upcoming May 2013 provincial election. (CBC)
B.C. Liberal and legislative house speaker Bill Barisoff is getting out of politics.

The Penticton MLA has announced he will not run in the next provincial election.

Just a few weeks ago, Barisoff brushed aside calls for his resignation after the Auditor General issued a scathing report on the legislature's finances.

As speaker, house finances are Baristoff's responsibility, and at the time, he took responsibility for the poor bookkeeping -- but as he tells Daybreak host Chris Walker, that's not why he's leaving politics.


Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Shambhala not to blame for overdose: editorial

hi-bc-120816-festival-grounds-shambhala-8col.jpg
The electronic music festival had its first death in its 15-year history on August 12, 2012, when a 23-year-old man from Sidney, B.C., died of a likely drug overdose. (Contributed by: Benjamin Jordan)

The annual Shambhala Music Festival in the Kootenays took a turn for the worse this year.

Each August it draws 10,000 music lovers to the Salmo River Ranch.It's renowned for its electronic music scene and drug use among its patrons.

This year a 23-year-old man died at the festival of a suspected drug overdose. It's the first death in the festival's 15-year history.

Bob Hall of the Nelson Star wrote an editorial on the tragedy. The paper chose to point the finger at personal responsibility and responses soon flooded their website.

Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with editor Bob Hall about their editorial, and the response it received.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Shred Kelly gives Chris Walker a banjo lesson

banjo chris.jpg
Shred Kelly's Tim Newton and Daybreak host-turned banjo player Chris Walker, show off their clawhammers (Adrian Nieoczym/CBC)

At last year's Roots and Blues festival, Daybreak host Chris Walker briefly became part of a Louisiana zydeco band, as he was taught to play the washboard.

This year, Chris picked a new genre, a new instrument, and some new catch-phrases including "bum ditty" and "clawhammer."

He got some hands-on instruction from Shred Kelly's Tim Newton.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

August 15, 1982: Canada's 1st Everest attempt

Thirty years ago today, on August 15th, 1982, the first Canadian expedition to Mt. Everest arrived at base camp.

It was the start of the long Canadian push for the summit.

Six weeks later, two men eventually made it to the top. Lawrie Skreslet from Calgary was the first. Pat Morrow, from Invermere, was the second.
everest1.jpg
(CBC Archives)

But the price was high.

Vancouver climber and CBC cameraman Blair Griffiths was killed on the Khumbu glacier, along with four sherpas.

Today, members of the 1982 Everest expedition are gathering in Canmore for a reunion.

Two of them joined Daybreak host Chris Walker to speak about the experience.
 
Pat Morrow was the expedition's photographer. Dave Read was a key member of the climbing party and is now a mountaineer and sailor based in Australia.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News:

Van Diest family turns murder scene into memorial trail

hi-bc-111110-van-diest-armstrong-bird.jpg
Taylor Van Diest, 19, died in hospital after she was beaten on Halloween night 2011 in Armstrong, B.C. (Facebook)

The family of murdered Armstrong teen, Taylor Van Diest, has come up with a unique way to preserve her memory.

Van Diest was attacked last Halloween
, next to a set of railway tracks.

A Cherryville man and his father have been charged in connection with her death

Now that area where she was found is set to become part of the Taylor Jade Van Diest Memorial Trail.

Taylor's uncle, Paul Albert, is the driving force behind the trail project. He spoke with Daybreak host, Chris Walker.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News:

Teck responds to smelter illness accusations

A U.S. study has found an unusually high incidence of gastrointestinal disease in a small U.S. town located downstream from a Teck smelter in Trail, B.C.


Northport, Wash., is a small community of 300 people, located 35 kilometres downstream from Teck's Trail operations -- one of the biggest lead and zinc smelters in the world.


Researchers at Harvard Medical School have now confirmed Northport residents have 10 to 15 times the normal rate of diseases such as colitis and Crohn's disease, which have symptoms including abdominal pain and diarrhea.


Tuesday on Daybreak, we heard from Jamie Papparich. She's a local activist who has been investigating the matter for years. She says the problems originate upstream with the Teck smelter in Trail.


Daybreak host Chris Walker then spoke with Dave Godlewski, the manager of Environment and Public Affairs with Teck Cominco America, in Spokane, Wash.


He says the company is working with community members to understand what's making them sick.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News:

Bilingualism lacking at Kelowna International Airport

mb-cole-airport-120808_852x480_2265271691.jpg
Canada's bilingualism watchdog is going undercover at eight major airports to see if travellers are served equally well in English and French. (CBC)

If you're boarding a flight to one of Canada's major cities this fall, you may bump into a spy.

A language spy.

Canada's Official Language Commissioner will be planting spies at major airports across the country to check on the level of bilingualism offered passengers.

Commissioner Fraser's people will be reporting on Halifax, Quebec City, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg, Edmonton and Vancouver.

They will also be sitting next to unsuspecting passengers on Air Canada flights.

Although Kelowna International Airport will not have spies on site, it is ranked as the10th busiest airport in Canada, and it's undergoing a 20 million dollar makeover to accommodate the growing number of visitors to the region.

To see how well Kelowna International Airport accommodates its french-speaking visitors, we sent Madonna Hamel to ask for help, en francais.
Download Flash Player to view this content.


Daybreak host, Chris Walker, also spoke with Kelowna International Airport manager, Sam Samaddar about the challenge of making the airport bilingual for french visitors.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News:

Doctor confirms high rate of colitis south of Teck smelter

teck smelter.jpg
Teck's lead and zinc smelter in Trail, B.C., upstream from Northport, Washington. (Contributed by: Teck Resources)
To residents of Northport Washington, the news might not be a surprise -- but for many, it might be validation.

Northport is a community of about 300 people located on the Columbia River.

For years, residents have claimed that something is making them sick, and they point north to the Teck smelter, just 35 kilometres upstream, in Trail.

We still don't know exactly what's behind the illnesses.

But now we do know for sure that something strange is going on in Northport.

A new survey by researchers at Harvard Medical School shows rates of colitis and Crohn's disease are 10 to 15 times higher than normal in Northport, and those researchers have ruled out genetics as a possible cause.

Jamie Papparich is a community activist from Northport who's been raising the alarm for years. In fact, she lobbied the medical community to get involved and to undertake this very survey.

She spoke with Daybreak host, Chris Walker.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

B.C. rower Gabe Bergen brings home silver



The games in London are over, and Canada did fairly well, coming away with 15 medals.

Among them was a silver medal in the Men's 8 rowing competition. One of the rowers on that team was Gabe Bergen.

Before the games, we spoke with his mom, Marilyn. She went to London to watch her son compete but she's back home now, picking peaches at her orchard in Cawston.

And that's where Daybreak host, Chris Walker, reached her once again.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Housing prices to keep falling in southern B.C.

bc-080704-house-sale.jpg
Brian Yu, with Central One Credit Union, says it will be a buyer's market for the next two years in B.C. (Ted S. Warren/Associated Press)
It's good news if you're buying a home -- not so much if you're selling.

The latest housing forecast for B.C. is out, and according to the Central One Credit Union, the tide could soon turn in southern B.C.

As Central One economist Brian Yu explains to Daybreak host, Chris Walker, a gloomy world economy and sluggish provincial economy will continue to drive down sales and prices across the province.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News:

City of Kelowna to challenge federal riding changes

boundareis kelowna.jpg
Electoral boundary map for the southern Interior (Contributed by: Government of Canada)

The federal electoral commission is proposing new boundaries for ridings in the southern Interior, and the changes don't sit well with the City of Kelowna.

The redrawing happens once a decade, after a census. The goal is to make ridings roughly the same size, about 100,000 people.

This time there's a plan that would separate downtown Kelowna from the rest of the city.

Downtown would join West Kelowna and Summerland, into a new riding called Central Okanagan-Coquihalla. The rest of the city would stay in Kelowna-Lake Country.

As Kelowna mayor Walter Gray explains to Daybreak host Chris Walker, the proposed changes just don't make sense and will try to get them altered.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Past coverage on the proposed electoral boundary changes
     - Conservatives and NDP say riding changes 'problematic'
     - Political analyst calls federal riding changes 'confusing'

Bookmark and Share

B.C. cherry prices plummet due to U.S. bumper crops

178930904_e2202d3674_z.jpg
Growers in the Okanagan can expect a market price of about 40 cents/lb for their cherries this year. (Contributed by: Rachel Andrew/Flikr)

It's a bumper crop for cherries this year.

But some growers have discovered, that can very bad for business.

Last week, growers who work with the Okanagan Tree Fruit Cooperative found out their cherries would fetch only 40 cents per pound.

For some, that's well below their 'break even' price, it would cost more to pick than the fruit is worth.

So they are leaving their perfectly-fine cherries on the trees to rot.

To give us a better idea of what is happening in the market right now, Daybreak reached Don Westcott, the director of grower services and logistics with B.C. Tree Fruits.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Ottawa considers private property on reserve

The federal government is looking at allowing bands to allow private property on their reserves.

That means band members could take out mortgages and own their homes and property, and also means non-aboriginal people could buy property on band lands.

To understand more Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with Manny Jules. He's a former chief of the Tk'emlúps First Nation, is the current chief commissioner of the First Nations Tax Commission and is the spokesman for the First Nations in support of this idea.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Minor football registration lagging in Kelowna

2892956305_5f90fe7f34.jpg
Registration for minor football in Kelowna is down 15 per cent this year. (Mike Hoff/Flikr)
With August well underway, it won't be long before young football players strap on the pads to get ready for a new season.

But these are challenging times for the sport.

The Kelowna Minor Football Association organizes teams for 7 to 13-year-olds, and registration for its programs is down about 15 per cent this year.

Chuck Liebrock is the association's president and a former professional football player.

He played in the Canadian Football League for 11 years, with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers and the Toronto Argonauts, and explained why he thinks fewer kids are playing football.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Kidney donor activist to run, bike, swim 500km

You think Ironman is a challenge?   

Check out the Ultraman this weekend in the Penticton-Princeton area.

Over three days, participants will swim 10km, bike 420km and finishing it off with an 84km run -- that's two marathons, back to back.

Penticton's Terry Craig will be in the race, and he'll be doing it all with one kidney. He donated his other one to his wife five years ago.

Terry spoke to Daybreak guest host Valerie McTavish on the eve of the big race.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Regional district paid steep price for Kootenay tailings pond

hi-bc-120803-salmo-tailing-pond-drain-8col.jpg
The tailings pond near Salmo, B.C., after a partial dam collapse forced the Regional District of Central Kootenay to drain the water that had transformed the tailings pond into a small lake (Bob Keating/CBC)

One month ago today people in Salmo were worried about a dam on a toxic tailings pond bursting, potentially sending a rush of heavy metals and rainwater onto their property.

The Regional District of Central Kootenay declared a state of emergency and spent half a million dollars pumping out the tailings and repairing the dam.

That raises the question: Why does a regional district own a tailings pond to begin with?

The answer takes us from the Kootenays to Panama City.

Kootenay reporter Bob Keating explains.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Cultural misunderstanding behind Kamloops 'flashings'

Last week, Kamloops RCMP were concerned a man had been exposing himself to children in Kamloops.

Officers said the man had been seen dropping his pants and standing for several minutes in the middle of a sportsfield at Aberdeen Elementary School and again at a playground at Pacific Way Elementary.

Turns out -- it's not what it seems.

Staff Sgt. Grant Learned with Kamloops RCMP explains what was really going on, to Daybreak host, Chris Walker.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Float planes plan for 'gong show' long weekend

float plane.jpg
Ariel view of Kelowna from inside Dave Stein's float plane (Chris Walker/CBC)

We're just about ready for one of the busiest weekends of the year.

On lakes around B.C., the August long weekend means wakeboards, jetskis, paddleboards and sailboats...and planes.

For pilots like Dave Stein, all that water traffic presents some challenges. He flies a float plane for Air Hart Aviation in Kelowna.

Daybreak host Chris Walker met him on the dock and went up for a ride.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Curious what the view is like up there? Check out the video footage of Chris' float plane trip!

Bookmark and Share

News:

Regional District to change how it deals with dangerous dogs

603527_309399025823107_1539702037_n.jpg
Shadow was kept in the CORD pound for almost 15 months while her owners fought an order to put the dog down (Contributed by: Shadow vs. RDCO Facebook page)
There's been a public uproar over how the Central Okanagan Regional District handles so-called problem dogs.

The case of Shadow, a young dog held in custody for 15 months, caused upwards of 100 people to protest at the district's last meeting.

And Shadow isn't the only dog that's been held for months at the pound.

Robert Hobson is the chair of the Central Okanagan Regional District. He admits the district has been too restrictive in how it handles dog complaints, and going forward will work more collaboratively with dog owners.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News:

Fairmont resort to reopen Friday after mudslide



The Fairmont Hot Springs Resort is getting set for its grand re-opening this weekend.
It comes less than three weeks after the resort was hit by a mudslide.

Marke Dickson is the Director of Sales and Marketing for Fairmont Hot Springs Resort.
He told Daybreak host Chris Walker the slide took out the resort's drinking and hot spring water line.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News:

Glut of natural gas hurts northern B.C. economy

li-bc-110928-fracking-gas-well.jpg
Gas wells like this one dot the landscape of northeastern B.C. in the pursuit of natural gas. (CBC)

Could it be a case of too much of a good thing?

The price of natural gas in North America is at a 10-year low.

And as those prices drop, drilling winds down -- leaving resource-rich communities in northern B.C. feeling the pinch.

Fort Nelson rests on one of the biggest gas sources in the world - the Horn River.

Jeremy Cote, the president of the Fort Nelson Chamber of Commerce, tells Daybreak host Chris Walker that business is slowing down in his community.
Download Flash Player to view this content.