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July 2012 Archives

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Authorities warn of dangerous waterways

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Three people were swept over the Cascade Falls on the Kettle River while tubing on Saturday. (Leia Hutchings/CBC)

Searchers are still looking for the body of a Scottish tourist, presumed drowned after three people died while tubing on the Kettle River this weekend.

The group was washed over Cascade Falls near Grand Forks.

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But the Kettle River isn't the only waterway in the province with high, fast water, and it's definitely not the only one that people are flocking to -- their tubes, inflatable rafts, boats and drinks in tow.

That's why some Search and Rescue and police officers want to get the message out to be safe.

Jeff Smedley is with Prince George Search and Rescue, Cassandra Pierre runs Coyote Cruises, which provides tubing rides down the channel between Okanagan and Skaha lakes, and Staff Sgt. Jim Harrison is with the Grand Forks RCMP, and helped investigate the drownings on the Kettle River.

Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with all three of them about dangerous waterways in B.C.'s interior.
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Osoyoos historian links B.C. to War of 1812

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British soldiers fire their muskets at the American forces during a re-staging of the War of 1812 in 2007. (Dave Chidley/Canadian Press)

When we think of the War of 1812, we think of the Brits fighting the Americans. We think of U.S. plans to take over what was then Upper and Lower Canada.

But, it turns out, there was also a link to the southern Interior -- Fort Astoria, at the mouth of the Columbia River.

Ken Favrholdt is the Executive Director and Curator of the Osoyoos and District Museum and Archives. He's won a $70,000 grant from the federal government examine that connection and put together a project on the war.
 
He spoke to Daybreak host, Chris Walker, from Osoyoos.
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Stockwell Day says Clark on right track in pipeline royalty fight

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Stockwell Day (Fred Chartrand/Canadian Press)
Premier Christy Clark is front and centre in the media these days, but you have to wonder what her endgame is in the Northern Gateway pipeline saga.

Why has she picked a fight with a neighbouring premier?

If she wants an answer to this, why did she walk out of national energy strategy talks with her fellow premiers?

Will her latest manoever end in "check" or "stalemate" ?    

Stockwell Day has been following the Enbridge saga. He's a former leader of the Canadian Alliance, has served as Finance Minister in Alberta and, as was a former federal cabinet minister as an MP for Okanagan Coquihalla.

He explained his take, to Daybreak host Chris Walker.
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Kelowna mountain a factor in city boundary expansion

The city of Kelowna is looking into the possibility of expanding its borders, and one of the areas it could absorb is the South Slopes region, which includes the proposed Kelowna Mountain resort community.

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An artist's rendition of the suspension bridge and Kelowna Mountain project in the summer months (Contributed by: Kelowna Mountain)

Developer Mark Consiglio, wants to build what he calls a self-sustaining golf, wine, ski and bike community on his 640-acre property.

The project stirred up some controversy recently, when Consiglio and his supporters opposed the regional district's efforts to pass an Official Community Plan for the area.

The plan passed, giving the regional district jurisdiction over the development and putting the project on hold, at least temporarily.

If Kelowna absorbs the South Slopes area, then it would have the authority to approve or not approve the project.

To understand how the project's developers feel about this, Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with Michele Rule, a former Kelowna city councillor who now works as a local government consultant for Kelowna Mountain.
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Environment Minister explains Christy Clark's walkout

Christy Clark surprised her fellow premiers Friday morning by boycotting talks on a national energy strategy.

It happened on this last day of the premiers' conference in Halifax.

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B.C. Premier Christy Clark, left, speaks as Alberta Premier Alison Redford looks on. (Larry MacDougal/The Canadian Press)
Clark says B.C. won't enter into negotiations until her prior demands on the Northern Gateway pipeline are met.

Of course, Northern Gateway is not the only pipeline proposal. Kinder Morgan also has plans to expand the Transmountain pipeline through the southern interior.

Terry Lake is B.C.'s minister of the environment.  On Monday, he made the pipeline  announcement on behalf of the premier, and explained to Daybreak host Chris Walker, what the premier is trying to accomplish by walking out on the meetings.

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Would you side with Redford or Clark on the Northern Gateway pipeline?

Vote now!

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Olympic Moms Pt. 5: Marilyn Bergen

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(left) Gabe Bergen (Olympic.ca) (right) Bergen's team, the Canadian men's eight crew, third from top, set a new world's best time at a World Cup meet in Lucerne, Switzerland in May. (Sigi Tischler/Keystone/Associated Press)

It must be in the genes, for Olympic rower Gabe Bergen.

Gabe will make his Olympic debut as part of the men's eight team in London.

He follows in the wake of his dad, Bob -- who rowed pairs in the 1976 Montreal games.

His brother Rob is a basketball players at University of Victoria, and his other brother Karel competes in Mixed Martial Arts.

Keeping watch over them all is mom Marilyn. Daybreak host Chris Walker reached her earlier at the family orchard in Cawston.
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Past entries in our Olympic Moms series:
     - Part 1: Dylan Armstrong's mother, Judy Armstrong
     - Part 2: Will Dean's mother, Jo-Anne Ritchie
     - Part 3: Catharine Pendrel's mother, Johanna Bertin
     - Part 4: Gabe Bergen's mother, Marilyn Bergen

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Seniors fight back at Kelowna self-defense class



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RCMP officer Richard Johns shows seniors at the Village at Mill Creek how to carry a purse or "man bag" safely (Gillianne Richards/CBC)
It's no secret that thieves and scam artists will target the vulnerable -- and seem to think seniors fit that category.

Some seniors, meantime, are fighting back.

They attended a self-defense workshop at the Village at Mill Creek Seniors Residence.

And while she's not yet a senior, Daybreak's Gillianne Richards learned a thing or two as well, as she explains to host, Chris Walker.

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RCMP won't pay for Kamloops officers' lawyers

The trial of three Kamloops mounties has hit another snag.

The three officers, along with a civilian jail guard, are accused of using surveillance cameras to watch two female prisoners have sex while in a holding cell.

The officers are facing breach of trust charges.

A two week preliminary hearing had been scheduled for September, but at a hearing this week, court was told the RCMP has decided against paying the officers legal fees.

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The cell at the Kamloops jail where the Aug. 18 incident occurred. (CBC)
As a result, their three lawyers have quit and the case has been adjourned.

The preliminary hearing will have to be rescheduled, further delaying a case that has already dragged on for almost two years.

Tom Stamatakis is the president of the Canadian Police Association, and spoke with Daybreak host, Chris Walker.

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Olympic Moms Pt. 4: Marcia Cooper

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(left) Groom Dana Cooke cleans tack (right) Dana Cooke and horse Roquefort (danacooke.ca)

Salmon Arm native Rebecca Howard and her mount Riddle Master are London-bound.

They'll compete in the equestrian eventing competition at the Olympics, which includes dressage, stadium jumping and cross-country.

Dana Cooke, of Merritt, B.C., will be along for the ride -- as support staff -- and her job as the groom is an important one.

It's all part of the path she's chosen to fulfill her own Olympic dream some day. To understand more, Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with her mother, Marcia Cooper in Merritt.
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Past entries in our Olympic Moms series:
     - Part 1: Dylan Armstrong's mother, Judy Armstrong
     - Part 2: Will Dean's mother, Jo-Anne Ritchie
     - Part 3: Catharine Pendrel's mother, Johanna Bertin

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Policing the 'social media Olympics' pointless

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The opening ceremonies get underway in London on Friday, and already social media sites are buzzing with leaked details from a rehearsal earlier this week.

That's exactly the kind of thing the International Olympic Committee is trying to prevent with a set of guidelines around what can and can't be posted online.

For his insights into how social media is shaping the Games, Daybreak reached Elias Makos, a technology journalist and analyst, and editor of thepostpc.com. He argues the rules are useless because it's virtually impossible to police what people say online, and even more difficult to prosecute.
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Olympic Moms Pt. 3: Johanna Bertin

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(left) Mountain biker Catharine Pendrel (Clement Allard/Canadian Press) (right) Catharine Pendrel competes at Hadleigh Farm in last July's Olympic test event, which she won (Bryn Lennon/Getty Images).

Catharine Pendrel heads into the Olympics as the reigning world champion in Mountain biking.

When she raced a test event on the course in London last year-she won that too. Not bad for a girl who says she "sucked at high school sports."

Catharine lives and trains in Kamloops, but she grew up on a horse farm in Harvey Station, New Brunswick.

That's where we reached her mom Johanna Bertin, earlier.
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The women's mountain biking event is on August 11th. That's Day 16 of the Olympic Games in London, and we hope to catch up with Johanna after that to get her call on how Catharine did.

Past entries in our Olympic Moms series:
     - Part 1: Dylan Armstrong's mother, Judy Armstrong
     - Part 2: Will Dean's mother, Jo-Anne Ritchie

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Rainy weather creates ideal earwig conditions

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Common earwig (Luis Miguel Bugallo Sánchez/Wikimedia Commons)
With their long antennaes and menacing pincers, earwigs are ugly, little insects.

They like to come out at night and munch on leaves, making them the bane of a garderner's existence.

They also like to hide out in moist areas, and all the rain we've had this summer has created ideal conditions for them to go forth and multiply.

Jocelyne Sewell knows only too well about the problems earwigs can cause. She is the vice-president of the Okanagan Garden and Roses Club in Vernon.

And for the last 5 years she has been on a mission to hunt down the earwigs making a meal of her garden.
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Okanagan fruit slim pickings this summer

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Orchardists say Okanagan cherries are slow to ripen this season, and too much rain is splitting the fruit skins. (Julie Kertesz/Wikimedia Commons)

Fruit growers in the Okanagan say severe summer storms have caused unprecedented damage to their crops, dashing their hopes of a bumper year for cherries and other fruits this summer.

Earlier this month, Daybreak spoke with Oliver orchardist, Greg Norton, who estimated he'd already lost millions of dollars worth of cherries, after a suprise hailstorm.

Now, many cherry varieties are ripe for the picking but Mother Nature has been washing the Okanagan landscape with rain and wind storms, leaving some parts of the Okanagan worse off than others.

Rick Machiel is a cherry and apple grower in Oliver.
Leo Gebert helps runs St Hubertus Winery, and
Tom Davison is the owner of Davison orchards in Vernon and grows a variety of veggies and fruits, including nectarines, pears, apples and peaches.

Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with all three farmers to gauge where their crops are at, as we near the end of July.
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Olympic Moms Pt. 2: Jo-Anne Richie

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(left) Will Dean (Olympic.ca) (right) Anthony Jacob, Kevin Kowalyk, Will Dean and Derek O'Farrell of Canada compete in the Men's Four repacharge race during the FISA Rowing World Championships in Bled, Slovenia in August 2011 (Richard Heathcote/Getty Images Europe)

When Kelowna's Will Dean gets set to row in the London Olympics, his mom will be able to relate to what he's going through.

Jo-Anne Ritchie is an elite athlete herself, having held the 1991 women's triathlon world championship and the 1993 world Cup in triathlon.

This summer, her son, Will, will compete for Team Canada in the men's rowing fours event.
 
Jo-Anne will travel to London to watch but before leaving she stopped in to our CBC studio in Kelowna to speak with Daybreak host, Chris Walker.
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Past entries in our Olympic Moms series:
     - Part 1: Dylan Armstrong's mother, Judy Armstrong

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West Kelowna to cut down 39 mature Katsura trees

The District of West Kelowna wants to give Gellatly Road a facelift.

It wants to widen the street and put in some parking.

Those improvements have turned controversial, because to get it done the District says it will cut down 39 Katsura trees lining the waterfront walkway.

Reports to council claim the trees have health problems.

They were originally planted a couple decades ago by members of the Gellatly Bay Parks and Trails Society.

Jeff Harte was one of them. He took Daybreak's Christina Low for a wander amongst the along the walkway to show off the Katsura trees.

Then host Chris Walker speaks with the District's director of engineering, Gary O'Rourke about why it needs to remove the trees.
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Pines Bible Camp to rebuild after fatal storm



The Pines Bible Camp in Grand Forks, B.C., has a difficult task ahead.

It's faced with rebuilding physically and spiritually after one of their campers, an 11-year-old boy, was killed in a violent windstorm over the weekend.

The storm snapped mature trees below the half-way mark.

You can see video footage of the aftermath on our Facebook page, taken by Jonathan Christian. He was scheduled to speak at the camp, and was on his way back to Pines Bible Camp when the winds picked up.
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Feature:

Olympic Moms Pt. 1: Judy Armstrong

The summer games get underway this Friday in London, and as a salute to our B.C. athletes -- and their families -- we've decided those cheering from below the podium, in our series "Olympic Moms."
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(Left) Shot putter Dylan Armstrong celebrates after winning a silver medal at the world track and field championships. (Andy Lyons/Getty Images) (Right) Dylan Armstrong's world-leading toss of 22.21 metres at the national championships this summer set a new Canadian record. (Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images)

At 6'4", 345lbs, Dylan Armstrong is an imposing presence.

On August 3rd, the Kamloops native hopes to muscle his way onto the podium at the summer Olympics in London.

In Beijing, Armstrong missed the bronze medal by one-quarter of a centimetre, then in 2011 became the world leader in shot put with a throw of 22.21 meters. Later that year he took home Canada's only medal at the IAAF World Championships in South Korea.

His mom, Judy will be in London to cheer him on, and if all goes according to plan, she'll watch him pick up his gold medal too.

She told Daybreak host, Chris Walker about that last pep talk before Dylan left for London.
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From the ground in Damascus, amid a civil war

The civil war in Syria has struck the heart of the country's capital city, Damascus.

Wednesday, opposition forces landed a deadly blow to at least three of the country's most powerful senior aides.

A bomb exploded at a high level meeting, killing a general, the country's defence minister and his deputy. The deputy is also President Bashar Al-Assad's brother-in-law.

Today, the UN Security Council will decide on a resolution for more sanctions against the Assad regime.

But between the bullets and the bombings are ordinary civilians, people who have no choice but to wait the battle out.

One of those people is Sami. We can't use his real name because he fears speaking out could compromise his safety.

We spoke to him from his home in Damascus.
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Beach Life Part 4: Which way to the beach?

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Royal Avenue Beach Access Kelowna, B.C. on the second day of Spring (Russ Dionne/Wikimedia Commons)

Getting to the beach isn't as easy as it used to be in Kelowna.

Daybreak's Madonna Hamel recently returned to the Okanagan after twenty years away.

She strolled down to her family's local beach access one night, only to find it inaccessible. Turns out that every night at 10 p.m. the Collett beach access gets locked behind a high gate.

So in this installment of our Beach Life series, Madonna got to wondering how the rest of the accesses are looking these days.
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Other entries in our Beach Life series:
- Beach Life Part 1: Little ships ahoy!
- Beach Life Part 2: Jacob's castle
- Beach Life Part 3: The Speedo

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Beach Life Part 3: The Speedo

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Is the Speedo back? It was the suit of choice for these swimmers at a 1987 swim meet at the University of Toronto (Hy Crutchett/Wikimedia Commons)
Have you ever wondered why women's swimwear is getting skimpier while men's suits seem to be frozen in length with the long board shorts?

Today in our Beach Life series, we'll shine the light on Speedos.

Daybreak's Christina Low took a walk to Kelowna's beaches to find out who's wearing them and who's not.

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Did you know...
     - A theme park in Straffordshire, England has a ban on speedos to prevent embarrasment to other members of the public.
     - The speedo was banned in Cape May, New Jersey for 30 years. Homophobic officials were concerned gay men were wearing them to attract partners. That ban was lifted in 2005.

Other entries in our Beach Life series:
- Beach Life Part 1: Little ships ahoy!
- Beach Life Part 2: Jacob's castle

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News:

B.C. orders closure of West Kelowna wake park

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A staff member shows off at Whiplash Cable Wake Park (Contributed by: kelownacablepark.com)
Have you ever wanted to wakeboard but felt you couldn't because you didn't have a boat?

That's why the Whiplash Cable Wake Park opened in West Kelowna this summer. It's one of only three cable wakeboard parks in Canada, but the idea has gained popularity in Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia.

Instead of being pulled behind a boat on a wake board or waterskiis, people are pulled from a network of overhead cables.

While it opened not even three weeks ago, the Whiplash Cable Wake Park has had to shut down. The company received a cease and desist order from the provincial government because of zoning issues over their water use permit.

Conrad Wiker is the owner and general manager of Whiplash Cable Wake Park. He explains the situation to Daybreak host, Chris Walker.
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Naramata Centre hit by racist grafitti

The quaint Okanagan community of Naramata has had an eventual month so far.

In early July it hosted more than 300 people from all over North America for the annual Harambee Festival, for families who have adopted African Children.

But as the festival wrapped up, Naramata was hit with racist graffiti.

Racist slurs were spray painted in several locations, including the school and the Naramata Centre, which hosted the festival.

Police have arrested four females in connection with the vandalism. Three are teens from Naramata and the fourth is a young adult who was visiting.

Pam Paterson is the president of the Harambee Cultural Society, and spoke with Daybreak host, Chris Walker.
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The Naramata Centre
plans to host a conference this fall, tackling the issue of racism in their community.

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Beach Life Part 2: Jacob's castle

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Sand art at île du Havre Aubert in Îles-de-la-Madeleine Benoit Rochon/Wikimedia Commons)
We're continuing our series called Beach Life on Daybreak, bringing you stories from the shores of lakes in the southern Interior.

Today -- the meaning of sandcastles.

Daybreak host Chris Walker meets up with Jacob and his grandmother, Hilda, on the shores of Okanagan Lake.

Jacob, 9, is an expert sandcastle builder, who has built "at least 500" in his career. He specializes in "Greek stuff" because he loves the complexity of the structures.
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Other entries in our Beach Life series:
     - Beach Life Part 1: Little ships ahoy!

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News:

Ministry of Forests to investigate Johnsons Landing slide

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At least three homes were engulfed in Thursday's landslide in Johnsons Landing, B.C., which authorities say trapped four people. (Bob Keating/CBC)

The B.C. government has announced it will conduct an inquiry into the events surrounding the landslide at Johnsons Landing.

The Ministry of Forests has confirmed that a concerned resident sent them an email just before the slide. Officials say the employee it was directed to was working in the field and didn't see the email until after the slide

The NDP claims a thousand jobs cuts in the forests ministry over the last decade have hampered the province's ability to provide early detection of landslides.

Steve Thomson is the minister of Forest Lands and Natural Resource Operations. He spoke with Daybreak host, Chris Walker.
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Could UFOs exist?

What happens if you're a kid and you see something so strange, that you're afraid no one will believe you?

That's what happened to Emily Wass and two of her friends.

One year ago, they witnessed three strange objects hovering over their street in Hamilton, Ontario, filling the sky with a strange glow.

Emily pounded on a neighbour's door -- and Simon Reynolds, a film director, dashed out to see what was going on...and recorded it.

Now he's working on a documentary about what he and Emily saw.

Here are Emily and Simon telling part of their story.
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News:

Eyewitness account of Fairmont mudslide


About 600 people remain stranded by a mudslide that hit the Fairmont Hot Springs resort in southeastern B.C. on Sunday.


Crews are working to restore access to the area and clear the debris from the resort, north of Cranbrook.


The mudslide swept down a creek bed tearing across Mountainside Golf Course before rushing down Fairmont Creek Road, where Derek Bay lives.


He explains what he heard and saw, to Daybreak host Chris Walker.

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Beach Life Part 1: Little ships ahoy!

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If you stand on shore in Kelowna on a windy summer day, you're pretty much guaranteed to see a flotilla of sailboats plying the waters of Okanagan Lake.

Sailing is a quintessential Kelowna activity -- one of the city's defining landmarks is even called "The Sails."

In Part 1 of our Beach Life series, Daybreak's Adrian Nieoczym headed to the Central Okangan Sailing Association and met up with the club's sailing director, Devin Rubadeau, to find out about learning to sail.
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Cessnas 'bombard' Cranbrook

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Cessnas lined up in Crawford Bay, B.C., on July 12, 2012. (Michael Perkins/International 180-185 Club).

Back in the 1970s, Charles "Bomber" Bombardier wanted to go fly-fishing with some buddies in the Mexican Baja.

So, he organized a group of Cessna pilot friends.

Now the International Cessna 180-185 Club has 1600 members worldwide and this weekend the club holds it's annual convention in Cranbrook.

Members have flown in from Texas, Conneticut, Oklahoma  and eastern Canada.

Jim Kitch is one of the club's directors. He and his wife flew the short hop from Calgary, and from there spoke to Daybreak host Chris Walker.
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PHOTOS: Johnsons Landing slide

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News:

Corporal punishment and cross-cultural parenting

A Kamloops father is on trial for spanking his three year old daughter, after leaving a red mark on her back and another on her knee last summer.

The court heard the marks were hardly visible two days later and the child did not suffer any permanent damage.

The father, and family cannot be identified, but we do know he is new to Canada.

Paul Legace is the Executive Director of the Kamloops Immigrant Services Society, he's seen some of the difficulties facing new Canadians when it comes to rasing their children.

He explained the challenges to Daybreak host Chris Walker.
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Backyard chicken coops attracting bears

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Bear experts say backyard chicken coops are the "new garbage" when it comes to attracting hungry bears. Adrian LaFleur says she's lost almost 20 birds to bears this year. (Redjar/Flikr)

Chickens are tasty, and their eggs are good too, especially when they're fresh!

To get those fresh birds and eggs, more people are raising chickens in their backyards, but that can be problematic when it comes to bears.

Adrian LaFleur knows all about that. She lives south of Golden and has been keeping chickens for years. Now she's missing some of them.

Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with Adrian and Frank Ritcey, the province's Bear Aware co-ordinator. He says backyard chicken coops are becoming a big problem, and electric fences may be the best solution.
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Prof caught between neighbours and university

It's back to the courtroom for UBC Okanagan and four private homeowners on Curtis Road.

The case is all about a back-door access to the university.

Students and faculty have been using a private easement on Curtis Road and some homeowners who live there don't like that, and have taken UBC-O to court.

The court ruled only people who use a certain part of the university should have access to the road easement. UBC-O is appealing that decision.

Monday, Daybreak spoke to the lawyer representing the four of the 12 households on Curtis Road.

John Greenough also lives there, and teaches at UBC Okanagan, but is not part of the lawsuit.

He spoke with Daybreak host, Chris Walker.
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News:

Pine Acres has cost Wesbank First Nation $1,000,000

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A sign at a recent rally where WFN band members joined the picket line alongside locked out Pine Acres employees (Adrian Nieocyzm/CBC)
For over a week now, workers have been walking the picket line outside the Pine Acres care facility in West Kelowna.

They have been locked out by their employer, the Westbank First Nation.

The WFN has operated the 63 bed seniors facility for almost 20 years, and says Pine Acres is losing money.

It's offering to maintain the wages and pensions of current workers, but it wants to cut what it pays new employees.

Robert Louie is the Chief of the Westbank First Nation and spoke with Daybreak host, Chris Walker.
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Residents say UBC-O flouting court decision

UBC Okanagan and residents who live nearby are at odds over a recent B.C. Supreme Court ruling that deals with a controversial pathway from Curtis Road to the UBC Okanagan campus.

The pathway has been a point of contention for a decade.

Property owners along Curtis Road say students are trespassing on private lands by using the pathway as a shortcut to campus.

Last week, the Supreme Court of B.C. issued a decision on matter -- but the residents and the university are now at odds over what that decision means.

Tom Smithwick is the lawyer representing four residents of Curtis Road. He spoke with Daybreak host Chris Walker.
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Kelowna barista goes for perfect pull

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Dawn-Luv Charles of Kelowna's Bean Scene Coffeeworks is practicing and preparing to serve the perfect espresso-based drinks at the Prarie Regional Barista Championships in Calgary this week (Cindy Davis/Wikimedia Commons)

Monday morning, Daybreak host Chris Walker stepped out from behind the mic and put on an apron, to get behind the counter at Bean Scene Coffeeworks in downtown Kelowna.

Helping him out was owner Dawn-Luv Charles.

This week Dawn is preparing for the Prairie Regional Barista Championships in Calgary, where she'll have to race to prepare and serve the perfect espresso based drinks.

But before heading out, she offered to teach Chris a few tricks of the trade.
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Thunderstorms on the way!

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A gorgeous sunrise this morning in Kelowna!  But there are thunderstorms on the way for much of the Southern Interior.

Issued 3:36 AM PDT Monday 09 July 2012
Severe thunderstorm watch for Central Okanagan - including Kelowna

Severe thunderstorms possible today.

This is an alert to the potential development of severe thunderstorms with large hail and damaging winds.

Monitor weather conditions..Listen for updated statements. If threatening weather approaches take immediate safety precautions.

Conditions are favourable for the development of thunderstorms today over the above mentioned regions. The potential exists that some of these thunderstorms may become severe this afternoon. These severe thunderstorms will be capable of producing damaging wind gusts and heavy downpours.

Here's the full warning from Environment Canada.

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Conservatives and NDP say riding changes 'problematic'

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Electoral boundary map for the southern Interior (Contributed by: Government of Canada)

The federal government is looking to change Canada's electoral boundaries. This happens every 10 years, right after a census, to reflect changing demographics in our country.

This time, big changes are proposed for the southern Interior.

One of those changes would put the City of Penticton in a riding with Castlegar and other parts of West Kootenay.

Currently, Penticton is represented by Conservative MP Dan Albas in the riding of Okanagan-Coquihalla, which it shares with the nearby communities of Summerland, Peachland and West Kelowna.

Another of the proposed changes would see Nelson taken out of a riding with its West Kootenay neighbours and added to the Kootenay-Columbia riding to the east.

That could cause big problems for NDP MP Alex Atamanenko.

Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with both Dan Albas and Alex Atamanenko about the changes.
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Here's a link to the Commission website.
Here's a pop-out map of the new boundaries.
And here are the dates for public hearings.

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Seniors' home lockout divides Westbank First Nation

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Members of the Westbank First Nation stand alongside union workers of the Pine Acres care facility, owned by the WFN, who have been locked out in a labour dispute (Adrian Nieocyzm/CBC)
Picket lines are up outside the Pine Acres care facility in West Kelowna. This week, workers were locked out by their employer, the Westbank First Nation.

WFN has operated the 63-bed facility for seniors for almost 20 years.

The union representing the workers says the WFN is demanding deep cuts to wages and benefits for new employees.

Daybreak's Adrian Nieoczym visited the picket line Wednesday and spoke with workers and their supporters.
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Analyst says federal riding changes "confusing"

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(Courtesy redecoupage-federal-redistribution.ca)

Canada is changing its federal electoral ridings to reflect population growth, and some of the biggest changes are here in the Southern Interior.

Downtown Kelowna will move to a Central Okanagan riding, with the rest of the city staying in Kelowna-Lake Country.

The city of Nelson is sheared off from its neighbours to the west and joins the East Kootenay.

Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with Wolf Depner, a political scientist at UBC Okanagan.
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Here's a link to the Commission website.
Here's a pop-out map of the new boundaries.
And here are the dates for public hearings.

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B.C. Fruit Growers' Association poll gives thumbs down to genetically modified apples.

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Apples ready for sale (Contributed by: Scott Bauer, USDA)

A recent B.C. Fruit Growers' Association poll shows 69 per cent of Canadians don't want genetically modified apples.

 

Okanagan Specialty Fruit in Summerland wants to grow genetically modified apples that don't turn brown, and the Fruit Growers' Association take issue with that.

 

Chris Walker talks to Glen Lucas, the General Manager of the B.C. Fruit Growers' Association. 

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ALOHA to KELOHA Scavenger Hunt WINNER!

Diana White in Lumby is the winner of CBC's VIP trip to the KELOHA Music & Arts Festival.
Thanks to everyone who played along!

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News:

Birds on the decline in Canada



Have you been wondering why you're not seeing as many barn swallows this year?

According to Canada's first country-wide bird study, almost half of our bird species are in decline -- and of that group sixty-six are now on the endangered list.

Peter Davidson was one of the biologists behind the study. He's one of the managers of Bird Studies Canada and spoke with Daybreak host Chris Walker.
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Kids for Inquiry debunk UFOs and psychic tricks

Dan Ryder is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at UBC Okanagan and also a member of the Okanagan's Center For Inquiry.

The group believes in rational thought, skepticism and scientific proof above mysticism and blind faith, and holds regular meetings to discuss topics they feel need debunking.

After Dan's young son watched his parents use reasoning and persuasive arguments to decide what they believe in, he decided he wanted a group to discuss his thoughts with too.

At their first meeting, in June, they brought in a guest from the astronomical society to talk about hoaxes surrounding UFO sightings, and their next meeting will feature a guest who reveals the tricks psychics use on their clients.
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