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March 2012 Archives

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Mayor slams provincial tax panel

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The mayor of 100 Mile House, Mitch Campsall, says a provincial panel aimed at changing local tax policies needs to have more municipal representation.  He spoke with Daybreak's Chris Walker:

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First Gay Pride Parade in Kamloops

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A week from today, Kamloops will hold its very first gay pride parade. While cities like Toronto and Vancouver have been doing it for decades, the idea never really took off in Kamloops.  Until now.  Thanks in part to a couple of tourism students at Thompson Rivers University, Katelyn Scorer and Kathleen Hutfluss (left). They talked to Shelley Joyce about what it's like to be young, gay and the new kid in town.

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And then Shelley asked why it's taken so long for Kamloops to organize a gay pride parade:

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Renovation Treasures - Part Two!

All week, we've been gathering your stories of the weird and wonderful treasures you've found while renovating!  Here are some more of your calls, in three chunks!

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West Kelowna is (almost) Hockeyville!

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Strange bedfellows!

John van Dongen left the BC Liberals to join the BC Conservatives.
He'll now sit as an independent MLA.
We called up another independent MLA to find out what life is like on the lonely side of the Legislature.
Bob Simpson spoke with Daybreak host Chris Walker.

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Renovation Treasures - Part One

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(R) Daybreak host Chris Walker found these cards strategically placed in the walls of his basement.
(L) Eric Linden found these bottles in a mansion he renovated in Bridesville, BC (Photo contributed)


We've been collecting your stories about strange things you've found while renovating.
Here are some of your calls!

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Rare book exhibit in Kelowna

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Rare books are on display in the main library at Okanagan College in Kelowna. If you are longing for the sensation of a real book in your hands, this display will make you yearn for those dreamy days of the hand-crafted book. The CBC's Shelley Joyce dropped in for a crash course in publishing with the curator of the exhibit.

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The display is on all week at the Okanagan College Library.

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In the final installation of Daybreak's series "Destination Downtown", we look at what's working and what's not in Downtown Kelowna.

To do this, Daybreak guest host Shelley Joyce convened a panel of three people with a big stake in the city's future.

Louie Drummond owns 3 restaurants and has been in business in the city centre for 17 years.

Aiden Cole is the marketing manager at Vineyard Networks, a downtown tech company, and on April 1st she is moving from East Kelowna to a downtown apartment.

Finally, Luke Stack is a Kelowna City Councillor.
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(Left to Right) Kelowna city councillor Luke Stack, speaks with Daybreak guest host Shelley Joyce, and is joined by marketing manager Aiden Cole, and restauranteur Louie Drummond. (Chris Walker/CBC)

Other episodes in Daybreak's "Destination Downtown" series include:
               - The high stakes highrise on Bernard
               - Giving a facelift to a notorious part of town
               - Kelowna's struggle to sell commercial real estate
               - Making Kelowna's core THE place to be

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Bernard Avenue is downtown Kelowna's main street.

Vancouver's Aquillini Developments has had plans to build a 27-story condo building there since 2008, but a tough economy put that proposal on hold.

Now the company is hoping to forge ahead and has received a new development permit from the city.

Kevin Hoffman is senior Vice-President of Aquillini Development and Construction, he told Daybreak guest host Shelley Joyce about those plans.
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Other episodes in Daybreak's "Destination Downtown" series include:
               - Panel: Making downtown Kelown a vibrant place to be
               - Giving a facelift to a notorious part of town
               - Kelowna's struggle to sell commercial real estate
               - Making Kelowna's core THE place to be

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Kelowna's Leon Avenue is notorious for it's drug dealers, prostitutes and homeless people.

The city has had limited success in its efforts to spur re-development in the area, but in our next segment of "Destination Downtown" we hear from one person who's trying to change that.

Dustin Sargent opened the popular Streaming Cafe on Leon Avenue almost 3 years ago.

Now he plans to construct a 3-story addition to his building.

He explained his plans to Daybreak guest host Shelley Joyce.
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Other episodes in Daybreak's "Destination Downtown" series include:
               - Panel: Making downtown Kelown a vibrant place to be
               - The high stakes highrise on Bernard
               - Kelowna's struggle to sell commercial real estate
               - Making Kelowna's core THE place to be

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Kelowna candidates reveal 2011 municipal election spending

We now know how much money candidates spent trying to get elected in last November's municipal campaigns.

In Kelowna, Mayor Walter Gray's campaign spent $57,490 dollars, as compared with the $29,800 spent by Sharon Shephard's campaign.

And a new player, the group Four Change, which supported a slate of eight council candidates -- six of whom won -- spent over $30,000.

To look at the value of those contributions Daybreak spoke with Wolf Depner, a political scientist and a PhD candidate at UBCO, and Dan Reeve is a professor of political science at Okanagan College.
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The records of all candidate election contributions are only available for viewing at Kelowna City Hall. Images of those contributions for Sharon Shepherd, Walter Gray and Four Change can be viewed below:
SharonShepherd.pdf
WalterGray1.pdf
WalterGray2.pdf
WalterGray3.pdf
WalterGray4.pdf
FourChange1.pdf
FourChange2.pdf
FourChange3.pdf 

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In Tuesday's edition of Daybreak's "Destination Downtown" series, we look at the difficulties of keeping Kelowna's downtown commerical community alive.

Take a walk down Bernard Avenue and you'll see some thriving businesses that have been around for years, but also quite a few empty storefronts.
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Passeport Clothing in downtown Kelowna is closing its doors, leaving one more empty storefront in the city's core (Jackie Sharkey/CBC)

For his insight into what's going on downtown, Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with Jayson McCarthy.

He's a commercial real estate agent with Colliers International.
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Other episodes in Daybreak's "Destination Downtown" series include:

Other episodes in Daybreak's "Destination Downtown" series include:
               - Panel: Making downtown Kelown a vibrant place to be
               - The high stakes highrise on Bernard
               - Giving a facelift to a notorious part of town
               - Making Kelowna's core THE place to be

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Is this Spring?

It may be the first day of spring, but it certainly doesn't look like it across the Southern Interior. Here are some of your photo submissions:


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This week, Daybreak is launching a new series called "Destination Downtown."

Downtown Kelowna often gets a bad rap, so this week, we'll be drilling into the city's core, meeting people who are trying to make it the place to be once again.

Adrian Nieoczym is putting the series together and spoke to Daybreak host Chris Walker about the special CBC project.
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Other episodes in Daybreak's "Destination Downtown" series include:
               - Panel: Making downtown Kelown a vibrant place to be
               - The high stakes highrise on Bernard
               - Giving a facelift to a notorious part of town
               - Kelowna's struggle to sell commercial real estate

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Teachers vote on next strike move at AGM

Members of the B.C. Teachers' Federation are drafting a response to Bill 22.

It's a big part of their annual general meeting, which began this weekend and wraps up Tuesday.

Last week, the B.C. government passed the legislation to end the teacher job actio, and their ability to strike.

Janet Steffenhagen, the education reporter for the Vancouver Sun, was at the BCTF's meeting all weekend, and spoke with Daybreak host Chris Walker about what's happened so far.
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West Kelowna makes Hockeyville Top 5



Hockeyville central in West Kelowna is a busy place this week.

Adrenaline is running high, as the community had a big win this weekend, which put it in the final five in CBC's Kraft Hockeyville competition.

The prize? $100,000 to upgrade its arena, and the chance to host an NHL Preseason game.

Until 9 p.m. Tuesday night, dedicated hockey fans and community members will be furiously clicking "vote" from their computers at home, and from Hockeyville Central, at the Comfort Inn in West Kelowna.

Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with West Kelowna Hockeyville bid co-ordinator Adam Less and Larry MacLean, who is taking time off work, and stayed up all night to keep voting for West Kelowna to make the final cut for Hockeyville 2012.
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Penticton plays matchmaker between landowners and gardeners

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Rick and Julia Valenti own this hertiage house in downtown Penticton, B.C., but don't have time to tend to the garden of their dreams. They've been matched with another couple in town who have agreed to put in a vegetable patch on their property (Contributed by: Rick Valenti)

Are you a homeowner who just doesn't have time to tend to a garden? Or, do you live in an apartment building but have always dreamed of a place to grow tomatoes?

A new trend is emerging in Penticton, that caters to both; people are swapping land... for food.

To get a better understanding of all this, Daybreak host Chris Walker reached Eva Durance, chair of the Penticton Urban Agriculture Association and Julia Valeni, a Penticton homeowner who's eager to have her land made into a veggie patch.

If you're interested in joining their Land 4 Food program, contact Eva through their website or at pentictonurbanag@gmail.com
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UBCO students go homeless for a week

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Bobbi Rieger, Austin Newton and Trina Renz are three UBCO students who have decided to "go homeless" for five days to rails awareness and money (Madonna Hamel/CBC).

For the past week, five UBCO students have been sleeping under a tarp on campus, living on doughnuts and coffee, essentially giving up basic necessities to raise awareness and money for the homeless.

It's part of a campaign called "5 days for the homeless," which began in Alberta and is now in 27 schools across Canada, the States and in Dubai.

Daybreak's Madonna Hamel went to visit three of UBC's participants in their temporary shelter under the Science building.

Austin Newton greeted her at the "front door."
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Kamloops RCMP try to connect with public

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RCMP Public Meeting in Kamloops Mar.15, 2012 (Shelley Joyce/CBC)
Police in Kamloops are looking for the public's help.

Thursday night was the second of two public input sessions meant to connect residents with the local RCMP

A small crowd of only about 25 made an appearance at the Interior Savings Centre to share concerns and ideas on how to make the city safer, still Kamloops Supt.Yves Lacasse says this is a novel approach to strategic planning for the force.

Daybreak freelancer Shelley Joyce spoke to a few of the people who showed up.
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Grandmother goes after law degree

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By the time Sheila Parenteau can practise law, she'll be 84 years old. She's studying for her LSATS now (Shelley Joyce/CBC).

Sheila Parenteau is just a week shy of her  79th birthday, and she'll probably celebrate the big day in the same way she spends most of her afternoons.

Very quietly.

Sheila is studying for her LSAT, and spends most days at the Law Courts library in Kamloops.

Daybreak freelancer Shelley Joyce tip-toed into Sheila's personal study space for a visit.
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Renowned Western artists stages first show in his hometown

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Bronc Rider, a sculpture by Len Monical. (Contributed by: Len Monical)
Sculptor Len Monical has fans all over the world.

His lifelike bronze sculptures depicting the Western way of life fetch up to $20,000 a piece.

They've been handed out to Grey Cup winners and sold to collectors from Texas to Tokyo.

Now for the first time, the 73-year-old artist is putting on a show in his hometown of 100 Mile House, in the South Cariboo.

Daybreak contributor Dene Moore dropped by the gallery to chat with him.
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West Kelowna, WFN react to provincial land swap decision

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Westbank First Nation chief Robert Louie speaks with Daybreak host Chris Walker at the CBC Kelowna studios on Mar.14 (Jackie Sharkey/CBC)
Land negotiations between the Westbank First Nation and the province have fizzled.

The initial agreement included 280 hectares of Crown land in exhange for three hectares of band land used to build the Westside Road interchange.

The District of West Kelowna and some of its residents didn't like that first offer, which included land in the Rose Valley Watershed.

So the province and the WFN decided to consider other parcels.Tuesday, the government changed the rules on what land could be part of negotiations. It now says any land around the Rose Valley Watershed, any regional park areas and any lands close to gravel reserves are now off the table.

That amounts to 85 per cent of the land the Westbank First Nation was considering. Robert Louie is the chief of the Westbank First Nation, and told Daybreak host Chris Walker he's disappointed with the decision.
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But West Kelowna mayor Doug Findlater was highly critical of the original deal and says he's pleased the province has changed its mind.
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Teachers to withdraw extracurricular services

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Teachers have voted to end volunteering to lead extracurricular activites in several school districts in B.C. (CBC)
Teachers in several school districts, including the Central Okanagan and Kamloops Thompson, have voted to withdraw all extracurricular services.

That means no lunchtime tutorials, no overnight field trips, no school plays.

To understand more, Daybreak spoke with Jason Karpuk, the president of the Kamloops Thomson Teachers Association -- a local branch of the provincial teachers' union.

We also heard from Larry Paul, the secretary treasurer for the Central Okanagan School District and Sue Reedman, one of the organizers of the Kamloops Festival of the Performing Arts, who says they'll have to make changes to their festival schedule, since teaachers will only particpate during school hours.
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Salmon Arm businesses stage "cash mob"

The city of Salmon Arm has hired a Kansas City company to redesign its website.

That decision doesn't rank high with some Salmon Arm Residents. They think the city should support local businesses.

To protest, a group of graphic designers is holding what it calls a "cash mob."

To understand more Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke with Salmon Arm's chief administrative officer, Carl Bannister, one of the "cash mob" organizers Kari Wilkinson, who owns Toliver Advertizing and Design, and Salmon Arm Mayor Nancy Cooper, who says city council will look at changing the way contracts are awarded in the future.
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Reservations open for B.C. Parks camping Thursday

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E.C. Manning park, in the heart of the Cascade mountains (B.C. Parks)

This Thursday at 7 a.m. the phone lines are open!

It's your chance to make a reservation and book your favorite B.C. camping spot. After all, there's nothing worse than packing up the kids, the boat, the camper and the floaty things only to discover that your favorite park is full.

Natalie DeShane is with B.C. Parks and told Daybreak host Chris Walker what to expect, and some tips and tricks to getting the best possible camping spot this summer!
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To book a camping spot in B.C. Parks this summer, you can reserve by calling 1-800-689-9025, or check out their website.

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Herb company spends millions to get health product certification

Strauss Herb Company in Kamloops is celebrating a major victory. Health Canada has given the company's biggest seller a "natural product number."

That will finally allow it to sell Strauss Heart Drops at major grocery and drug store chains across the country.

The company has spent millions in its battle with federal regulators.

Shelley Joyce donned a hairnet and a lab coat to find out if there is still heart in the family business.
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RCMP recommend charges against Invermere deer cull group

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The District of Invermere has a permit to kill up to 100 urban deer. As of Sunday 16 have been euthanized, and the permit expires Mar. 15. Invermere is the third Kootenay community to cull problem urban deer over the past six months. (CBC)

Invermere is usually a pretty quiet place this time of year, but the atmosphere has become tense for some people.

The town is in the middle of a deer cull, it has a permit to get rid of 100 animals by Thursday.

When it was announced, opponents put up political and legal roadblocks, but the program did go ahead. But in the last week the protests have become confrontational, and now RCMP have stepped in.

To understand why, Daybreak host Chris Walker spoke to Invermere Mayor Gerry Taft.
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And also spoke with Invermere Deer Protection Organization spokesperson, Devin Kazakoff.
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Khaos: reviewed

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Khaos: the opera stars Allison Girvan, as Greek mythic figure Persephone (Contributed by: Nelson Opera Company)
An opera is a huge undertaking for any group; just staging it takes time and organization.

Yet, not only did Nelson take on that task, but people there decided to start from scratch.

Khaos was commissioned in 2009 by Nelson's Amy Ferguson Institute. Nicola Harwood created the libretto and Don Macdonald composed the music.

Thursday night, Khaos took to the stage with a cast of 27 singers and a solo dancer. It has a production staff of 15, including designers, directors and technicians.

Daybreak's Chris Walker was there, so was Hilary Clarke, a reviewer with Opera Canada.
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All of this week in our series "Getting stumped" foresters, loggers and academics told us their concerns about the state of BC's forest.

All these concerns have also been raised by the Auditor General report on forestry.

However they are concerns not shared by the province.

We're giving the final word on the matter to Assistant Auditor General Morris Sydor. He's responsible for the AG's report on Forestry.
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Grand Forks remembers historic hotel

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Wednesday morning, firefighters try in vain to stop flames from tearing through The Grand Forks Hotel in Grand Forks, B.C., built in 1909. (RCMP)
On his way to Nelson Thursday, for the premiere of Khaos, Daybreak host Chris Walker stopped in Grand Forks.

He couldn't miss the burnt shell of the old Grand Forks Hotel. It's right downtown.

So is the Kokomo coffee shop. In fact, its bay window looks over the pile of ashes that was once a historical haunt.

Chris went inside to find out who was sitting in that window and to hear their thoughts on the much-changed view from their plush armchairs.
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This week we've been looking into forestry concerns raised by the Auditor General.

Foresters tell us the situation is dire, loggers are expressing concerns about their future, academics tell us the government is out of touch, and the auditor general concludes the ministry has fuzzy objectives, defiecient managament practises, and poor monitoring.

Steve Thomson is the Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations. He spoke to some of those concerns with Daybreak host Chris Walker.
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Original opera premieres in Nelson

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Nelson's own Allison Girvan stars as Persephone in Khaos: the Opera, which premieres Thursday in Nelson.

Persephone, Pluto, Demeter and Hades -- all names from a Greek myth whose plot is probably a bit fuzzy for most of us.

But an opera company in Nelson is about to refresh our memories.

They've dusted off the Greek myth and re-imagined it for a modern Kootenay audience.

The opera is called Khaos, and its world premiere is Thursday night in Nelson.

Marty Horswill is the show's producer, he spoke with Daybreak host Chris Walker.
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Listen to Black Water, from Khaos: the opera.

Freelancer Bill Metcalfe produced a radio documentary on the opera. It first aired last weekend on CBC's North by Northwest with Sheryl MacKay.
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The B.C. Auditor general's recent report casts a long shadow on how the province is doing when it comes to managing the province's forests.

One issue not necessary addressed by the auditor general, but certainly on the minds of many is the export of raw logs.

Hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of timber is exported to Asian countries like China. Last year that was about $500 million worth of trees, up from about $200 million in 2009.

Bob Matters speaks for the Wood Council of the United Steel Workers, he told Daybreak's David French those exports mean job losses on the coast, and also directly affect interior sawmills.
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So is this a fact of life, or can this be changed?
John Karakatsoulis studies issues like this, he's a founding faculty member of the Natural Resources science department at Thompson Rivers University.
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Penticton Vees break North American wins record

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The Penticton Vees could break a record for most consecutive wins on Tuesday. (Penticton Minor Hockey Association)
The Penticton Vees have re-written the record book, yet again.

The Vees defeated the Trail Smoke Eaters last night in Penticton, 10-0.

In doing so, the team set a new North American junior hockey record with its 41st consecutive victory.

It was also the Vees 53rd win of the season, which set a new BCHL record.

As he is most game nights, Vees fan, Derek Hurst, was at the South Okanagan Events Centre for the game, and spoke with Daybreak's Chris Walker.
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Historian remembers Grand Forks Hotel

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Firefighters battle the blaze set by an arsonist Wednesday morning at the Grand Forks Hotel (Contributed by: RCMP)
Arson has destroyed yet another historic, landmark hotel.

The Grand Forks Hotel, went up in flames early Wednesday morning -- it's one of two hotel fires set overnight in Grand Forks. Part of the nearby Winnipeg Hotel was also burned, and officials blame an arsonist for both fires.

The Grand Forks Hotel was built in 1909, and is the third of three century-old hotels in that town to be destroyed by fire.

Alice Glanville is a well known historian on the Boundary region who spent many of her 91 years in Grand Forks.

She spoke with Daybreak host, Chris Walker.
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Note-share program created for displaced Kamloops students

A massive fire at the Copper Ridge Court apartment complex in Kamloops, B.C., last week displaced about 100 people from their homes.

Among them are more than 30 students attending Thompson Rivers University.

Alexandra Moulten is a 4th year anthropology student, the fire left her and the others without  their study notes, and midterm exams are just around the corner.

But as difficult as things are for students like Alexandra, they're not being left to cope on their own, the local United Way has stepped in to help set up a note-share program and support the students.
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The provincial government is responsible for about 90 per cent of our timber land base, and according to the Auditor General, it has been doing a poor job managing it.

A recent report criticizes the government's forest policies, says the province lacks direction and doesn't have clearly defined timber objectives.

All this week, Daybreak takes a look at the state of our forests in our series called "Getting Stumped."

Anthony Britneff is a retired professional forester. He spent 39 years in the BC's Forest Service, working in forest inventory, silviculture and forest health programs.

He told Daybreak's Christina Low there is a crisis in the woods.
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Suzanne Simard teaches at UBC's Faculty of forestry and has surveyed forests throughout the Southern Interior.

She spoke with Daybreak guest host Valerie McTavish about what the province DOESN'T know about the state of its own forests.
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Kelowna author makes CBC short story finals

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CBC's Canada Writes short story contest is once fierce competition; 3,750 entries from across Canada have been whitted down.

Ten made the english shortlist, another 10 made the french.

One of those 10 english stories is written by Kelowna resident Alix Halwey. She teaches English and creative writing at Okanagan College, and is a regular on Daybreak's summer poetry series.

She's at home on parental leave where "baby brain" did not keep her from tapping out Tentcity -- a tale the judges loved.

She spoke with Daybreak guest host Valerie McTavish about juggling motherhood and writing.
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A recent auditor general's report says B.C.'s forests have been badly mismanaged.

Just how badly mismanaged are B.C.'s forests? Our special series "Getting Stumped" looks to understand just that.

All of this week we will hear from foresters, academics, people connected to the industry and the government.

In the first part of our series, part of the Auditor General's report says the government has failed to properly monitor and maintain B.C.'s timber supply, and forests haven't been properly replanted.

Jesper Nielsen is the Manager of Nakusp and Area Community Forests. He's a professional forester and has been watching this issue for years, he spoke with Daybreak guest host Valerie McTavish.
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Humankind's oldest ancestor found in the Burgess Shale

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Reconstruction of Pikaia gracilens (Contributed by: Marianne Collins)

New research on a fossil first found almost a century ago at the Burgess Shale in Yoho National Park appears to be the earliest ancestor of human life yet uncovered.

The organism lived 505 million years ago, was about the size of a man's thumb and lived underwater.

It's the oldest known member of the chordates, a group that includes all animals that have a backbone.

Daybreak guest host Valerie McTavish spoke with Jean Bernard Caron from the Royal Ontario Museum. He is part of the research team that made the discovery, published today in the journal Biological Reviews.
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Kamloops Canucks fan shows off Bruins tattoo

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Jamie Meegan's Bruins tattoo (Adrian Nieoczym/CBC)

Back during the Stanley Cup playoffs, Daybreak had the pleasure of meeting Ryan Lesage and Jamie Meegan.

These two hockey frenemies rooting for opposite teams. Ryan is a Bruins fan, and Jamie cheers for the Canucks.

The pair bet each other that if their team lost the final, they'd get the other team's logo tattooed prominantly on their body.

When Daybreak took the show on the road Friday, we couldn't resist the opportunity to see how it turned out.
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Daybreak LIVE ON LOCATION!

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Daybreak's Chris Walker and Alya Ramadan will be LIVE ON LOCATION for a very special broadcast in Kamloops, B.C.

Come meet the crew at The Art We Are at 246 Victoria St. in beautiful downtown Kamloops for a live broadcast Friday morning from 6:00-8:30 a.m. PT.

Hope to see you there!

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When it comes to the proposed Ajax copper gold mine in Kamloops, the debate over jobs versus lifestyle and environment rages on.

Which leads us to ask the question: How much does good PR on the part of the mining company sway the community?

Could Ajax learn a thing or two from Osisko mining corporation in Malartic, Quebec?

It's home to Canada's largest ever open-pit gold mine, and to build the mind the company transplanted the entire community, uprooting citizens and moving houses.

Helen Thibault used to be a citizen with concerns about the project, but now she's the Director of Communications for the mine.
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If it is built, the Ajax Mine will radically alter the landscape; much of the mine would be constructed on what is now native grassland.

Lauch Fraser is the Canada Research Chair in Community and Ecosystem Ecology at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops.
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High-profile coalition looks to legalize pot

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Infographic produced by Stop the Violence based on their own polling (stoptheviolencebc.org)

The Stop the Violence coalition is barely three years old, but the movement to legalise marijuana has the ringing endorsements of health professionals, law enforcement officers, former mayors and four former Attorneys General.

That includes people like Mike Harcourt, Larry Campbell, Geoff Plant, and  Ujjal Dosanjh.

Dr Evan Wood is the founder of Stop the Violence, and was in Kelowna for a panel discussion Thursday evening at the Rotary Centre for the Arts.
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