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When focusing on the positives of northern B.C. becomes a bad thing

prince george wtf.PNG
The Facebook banners for "Hell Yeah Prince George" which promotes positivity, and "WTF Prince George," a page that wants to "share the positive with the negative."

In just a few days, the Facebook page Hell Yeah Prince George has gained over seven thousand members. It has just one rule: any negative posts will be deleted. But some people worry that focusing on nothing but the positives can actually be negative. We speak with "Hell Yeah Prince George" creator Scott McWalter, and Bryce Lokken, a marketer and social media professional who sees a downside to too much positivity.

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Listener comments:

Gord Gauthier:

"Can't work to better a community with out seeing all sides of it. Yes some people and post go off on a tangent. Some not pleasing to all. I choose not to let every whiner get me down,just move on. But is great when one has a issue and we work together to help, not sweep it away."

Rae-Lynn Olson:

"I think you need to have the good with the bad. The positive only posts rule is taken too far - bordering censorship. There are absolute great things about every town, but without discussing the problems that all places have, how are we supposed to be aware, and be able to address these problems?"

Devon Wigglesworth:

"Why do you have to accept negativity?  Positive attitudes produce positive attitudes.  Negative produce same.  Unfortunately we have too much negativity in the news and other media, web pages and Facebook pages!  It's nice to find a refreshing point of shelter from all the negativity!  'Fort St John Rules' is our local page that does the same.  There should be more sites like this.  We listen every day to harsh things going on in the world.  Ukraine invasion, missing airplanes, abductions and abuse of women on the Highway of Tears, these things I hear everyday.  This is a beacon of happiness and joy in our negative media!"

Maggie Jo:

 "No one is hiding their heads in sand here by participating in positive posts-only sites - and quite frankly, they most likely lead happier lives even while they are all most likely consciously consumed/aware of what is going on in their midst. Sometimes we just need a break from all the negativity and problems to veg out in a more positive forum. Nothing wrong with 'dat. Frankly...please bring MORE positive sites."

Michael Nichols:

"There are all kinds of opportunities to note the negative about anything. If a person creates a page to emphasize the positive and edit out the negative that's entirely his right. Those who wish to broadcast the negative are free to start their own page. I disagree that people are afraid to complain. I see and here it all the time. I think people are more reluctant to offer praise."

Walter Fricke:

"Every town has it's perpetually complaining crowd. A town is what you make of it. You can make it great or you can make it terrible. It's up to you."

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