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The tale of Lucy the Canada Goose


Part One:

When Diane VanderWiel rescued a little ball of fluff near her farm in Fort St James, she didn't know it would grow up to be a Canada Goose. But "Lucy," as she was named, was grateful for the care and chose to stick around the farm. Everything was fine until federal agents came to cart Lucy away. Here's our first conversation with Diana, from January 2012.

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Part Two:

When "Lucy", the Canada Goose was taken away from Diane VanderWiel's farm, it seemed like a hopeless case: federal rules don't allow for ownership of migratory birds. But Diane argued Lucy was free to come and go as she pleased, and mounted a campaign to get her back: a campaign that captured the attention of none less than Canada's Environment Minister.From January 2012.

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Part Three:

"Lucy" the Canada Goose became the subject of national attention in January 2012 when she was taken away from her home in Fort St James by conservation officers, only to be returned when Environment Minister Peter Kent got involved. In July 2012, Daybreak called Lucy's friend Diane VanderWiel to find out how Lucy was doing six months later.


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