host picture

Interviews

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Tax work camps to pay doctors: District

Hadland.png
Arthur Hadland (arthurhadland.ca).Municipal leaders from the Peace River Regional District want to be able to tax work camps in the northeast. 

Arthur Hadland is the Director of the Area C Electoral District. He says local mayors and the district are working together to lobby the province to tax work camps in the region so the revenues can be used to improve health care and recruit doctors to the area. 

Listen to the full interview below:

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Researchers looking for underwater fishing wall built by Haida in the last ice age

weir.jpg
This wood fishing weir was built in 2013 to help catch fish on the Koeye River near Bella Coola. Now researchers are looking for a stone fishing weir they believe dates back to the last ice age. Photo credit Grant Callegari and the Hakai Beach Institute.

A stone wall buried underwater could open the doors to the history of Haida culture. Researchers are looking for a fishing weir- a stone wall used to help capture fish-  that they believe was built in the last ice age, around fourteen thousand years ago.
If the weir is found, it would be the oldest known in the world, and shed new understanding on Haida culture.

Quentin Mackie is a professor of anthropology at the University of Victoria. He's leading a team to Gwaii Haanas National Park to search out the weir.

"We have very high resolution of the sea floor," Mackie says. "We know that people were there as long as twelve-and-half thousand [years ago]... so it's not a huge stretch to think that people may have been using those streams."

"It just captures the imagination to think there may be this lost world down there." 

Listen to his interview with Daybreak's Carolina de Ryk below:



Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Northern Health responds to calls for improved health care in Fort St John

fsj medical clinic.PNG
Images from the Fort St John unattached patient medical clinic, one of the ways Northern Health is trying to provide healthcare to residents of the Peace without a family doctor. (fsjmedicalclinic.com)

Northern Health says it's doing everything it can to convince medical professionals to move to Fort St. John. The response comes after more than a thousand people signed an online petition calling for an end the doctor shortage. 

Angela De Smit is the CEO for Northern Health's Northeast Health Service Delivery Area. She says the health authority is courting doctors and nurses to move to the region, even paying for potential candidates to see and experience the north, and tailoring the experience to each individual.

"So if they have kids in speed skating or kids in soccer or their wife has a profession, then we try to link them up so they can see how attractive our northern communities are," she says.

One problem, De Smit says, is they can't force doctors and nurses to move, and there is high demand for health professionals across the country. 

In the meantime she says Northern Health is working with community partners and looking for new ways of delivering health care.

Listen to the full interview with de Smit below: