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Cornering Gas: September 2011 Archives

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Cornering Gas:

Cornering Gas: Friday

Cornering Gas continues with the light and the heavy.

Daybreak strolls the aisle at a tiny Fort Nelson store that gives "one stop shopping" a whole new meaning.

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Fracking is a thirsty business. Fracking just one shale gas well can use as much 600 Olympic-size swimming pools of water. That's a big problem for drought-prone Dawson Creek. So the northern city is freeing up "frack water" by putting its sewage up for sale.

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Christy Clark may have thrown her backing behind shale gas fracking... But not everyone is sold on the rapid development.

 

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Cornering Gas:

Cornering Gas: Thursday

Water, Earthquakes and growing towns -- oh my!

First, Daybreak's Cornering Gas team Robert Doane and Betsy Trumpener hear from northeast residents who are concerned about the water use in the region's Oil and Gas industry.

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Next, it's Town and Fracking. Fort Nelson is booming and that's changing the local landscape.

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Finally,

Could a RUMBLIN' in the horn river be man-made? As international companies descend upon the world class gas play, there seems to be a whole lotta shaking goin on.

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Cornering Gas:

Cornering Gas: Wednesday

 
 

There's not a bust in sight. Thanks to the development of shale gas plays in northeastern B.C., there's likely enough gas to for a century. That's according to Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers

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They moved to Canada to enjoy the quiet life. Now a German couple say their quiet life is being drowned out by gas activity.

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"Fracking" for shale gas is a booming, multi-billion dollar business in B.C. Energy companies are blasting water and chemicals deep underground -- to release natural gas -- from shale rocks. The boom has created thousands of jobs -- for Canadian workers. But some local people believe -- that gas drilling on their doorsteps -- is slowly killing them.

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Charl Badenhorst with Northern Health

Some people living amidst northern B.C.'s gas wells, plants, and pipelines -- are raising serious concerns -- about their health. They're demanding the B.C. government step in -- to ensure their safety. Charl Badenhorst backs that call - for health surveillance and tracking -- of people exposed to gas and chemicals.

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