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April 2014 Archives

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Interviews:

When autistic children are murdered, are they treated as victims or triggers?

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Prince Rupert RCMP say autistic 16-year-old Robbie Robertson was killed by his mother (Facebook).
Prince Rupert RCMP say that earlier this month , 40-year-old Angie Robertson killed her autistic 16-year-old son, then she killed herself. Family members say Robertson and her son didn't get enough support. But Shannon Rosa says that's no excuse for a mother to kill her child. Rosa is the mother of a son with autism, and an advocate for families with autistic children. In a blog post titled "Please Stop Being Understanding When Austic Kids are Murdered," she writes:

"Once again the implication is that Robert's mother Angie, who could tell people what she was experiencing and could have walked away, was the victim; and that Robert, who relied wholly on Angie to communicate and advocate for him and who had no escape options, was ... his mother's trigger."

Listen to the full interview with Shannon Rosa below:

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Mother, father and son among hundreds laid off in Tumbler Ridge

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The Wolverine coal mine in Tumbler Ridge employed over 400 people (Andrew Kurjata/CBC)

Two weeks ago, Monica Jeffrey, her husband, and her son all had jobs at the Wolverine coal mine in Tumbler Ridge. 

Today they are among nearly seven hundred people laid off because of Walter Energy's decision to shut down its Wolverine mine in Tumbler Ridge, as well as the Brazion mine in nearby Chetwynd.

Jeffrey says news of the lay-offs came without warning, and that because the lay-offs are temporary, the company does not have to pay severance for up to two years.

Tumbler Ridge is a coal mining town and Jeffery says with few other opportunities, panic has set in. 

Listen to the full interview with Monica Jeffrey below:

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Egg Curry from our Coastal Cooking Columnist

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Adrienne Johnston's Egg Curry dish is inspired by Naomi Duiguid's recipe in her book Burma.

To serve four people:

Follow my recipe for perfectly boiled eggs from the last column. Use 8 eggs and only

set the timer for 7 minutes. When the eggs are cool tap them all over with the back of

a spoon and drop them back into cold water. Use a small spoon to slip the shells off by

insinuating the spoon under the cracked shells and gently lifting the shells off the eggs.

The whites will be quite firm but the eggs will not be quite hard cooked through to the

yolk. Working under water makes this still easier. Rinse the eggs to get rid of every

scrap of shell and then place the eggs on paper towels to dry off.

1 medium onion peeled and sliced thin

4 cloves garlic minced

1 inch piece of fresh ginger, grated

6 or 7 curry leaves

1 big handful of fresh dill washed, dried and chopped

1 heaped teaspoon of ground coriander

¾ teaspoon of ground cumin

1 ½ teaspoon dried fenugreek leaves

½ cup coconut milk

½ teaspoon chile flakes

1 teaspoon paprika

½ teaspoon turmeric

Salt to your own taste

4 Tablespoons of sunflower seed oil (or which ever oil you prefer to cook with)

2 tablespoons of lemon juice

Rub the eggs with the turmeric and salt.

Heat a medium sized dutch oven over medium high heat. Add the oil and then the eggs

and fry the eggs on all sides. To fry the ends you might have to use tongs to hold them

upright.

Remove the eggs from the fat and add half of the onions and fry them gently till they are

light brown. Add the ginger, garlic and curry leaves and continue to sauté them... Now

add the dry spices and fry stirring till fragrant. Pour in the coconut milk, stir and simmer

for a few minutes till it is thick. Add the eggs and the dill. Add the lemon juice. Taste

and adjust the salt if needed. Serve over rice, pita bread or roti.

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Interviews:

Inclusion B.C. says recent murder-suicide should be a wake-up call

How well served are families with special needs? Earlier this month, the bodies of 40-year-old Angie Robinson and her 16-year-old autistic son, Robert were found in their home. Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with Faith Bodnar, executive director of Inclusion B.C. 

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Is Prince George spending money meant for environmental projects on road rehab?

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The city of Prince George is spending a record $9.8 million on fixing city roads. Former mayor Dan Rogers is concerned money meant for environmental projects is being funneled into this budget.

The former mayor of Prince George says the city is spending money meant for environmental projects on road rehab.

The city announced earlier this year that a record $9.8 million would be spent on road projects, $2 million of which comes from the federal gas tax fund.

Former mayor Dan Rogers says this is breaking the rules. He believes money from the fund must be spent in one of three areas: making cleaner air, making cleaner water, or reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Rogers says by spending money on road projects, the city is breaking a legally binding agreement.

"My daughter's in grade eight, I think you can ask the science class if cranking up the asphalt plants reduces greenhouse gas emissions," he says.

In the past, Prince George used federal gas tax money for creating the district energy system that uses wood waste to heat downtown buildings. It's also been used to create walking trails to reduce reliance on cars.

In a letter to the city of Prince George from August 2013, the Union of B.C. Municipalities says road projects qualify for the gas tax fund if they contribute to reducing greenhouse gas. As an example, they say smoother roads can reduce friction and lower emissions.

Listen: Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata explains how the gas tax fund works, and why Rogers is concerned

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Prince George city councillor Cameron Stolz says the environmental component of the fund has since been removed, bringing B.C. in line with the rest of Canada.

"Starting in 2014, moving forward, we have full access to use the gas tax funds as we desire."

Stolz says the environmental component was in place because cities in the Lower Mainland wanted to focus on public transit.

"When you're looking at Prince George, we have a very limited number of buses that we can buy and provide that actually has an impact on our community."

Rogers disagrees. 

"It's absolutely clear, despite any changes that might have occurred within the tables that is the test It needs to be either an environmental improvement that makes cleaner air, water, or reduces greenhouse gas emissions."

External Links:


How does your city spend Federal Gas Tax money?

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities has created an online calculator so you can find out how different cities are using the gas tax fund. See some highlights below, or find your own city using the calculator.

Prince George
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Fort St John
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Dawson Creek

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Prince Rupert

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Terrace

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Quesnel

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Kamloops

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Kelowna

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Interviews:

Modern struggles retold through ancient First Nations art styles

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(Marissa Harvey/CBC)

World-renowned First Nations carver Ya'Ya Charles Heit creates art to heal. His intricately carved totem poles blend ancient traditions, with contemporary themes. CBC reporter Marissa Harvey visited Ya'Ya's studio and gallery at his home in the Kispiox Valley in northwest B.C.

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Interviews:

Poachers, Pollluters and Politics

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He's been attacked by a grizzly, hit by a truck, stabbed in the chest, and fell down a waterfall. Now Randy Nelson has written a book about his 35 years as a federal Fisheries Officer. He speaks with George Baker.

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Interviews:

"What are we going to to do?" Families wondering if they can stay in Fort St John as doctor crisis deepens

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The doctor shortage in Fort St. John is about to get worse.

By this summer, the city of of eighteen thousand (with a service area of 26 thousand) will be down to 13 doctors. One of the two walk in clinics will also close at the end of the month.

Doctor Paul Mackey is a spokesperson for the Fort St. John Medical Clinic. He says doctors in the community are facing huge pressures.

"Can I honestly say I really like turning up to work? Well, less and less so. So it's a struggle. Our time may one day come too soon."

Katie Maximick is among those who is losing her doctor. Engaged and ready to start a family, she's questioning whether she has a future in Fort St John.

"It's something that definitely makes a lot of us, young women and families in Fort St John go, 'are we going to stay or are we going to move?'"

Maximick says there's a sense in the community that Northern Health isn't doing enough to address the problem, and she's also heard some people who are feeling betrayed by the doctors who are leaving.

"Which isn't fair, I understand that the doctors are extremely overworked... but at the same time, if you know that the community is in a huge crisis, why are eight of you walking out at the same time? That's what people are saying. Why are you leaving us when you know this is what we're going through, what about us?"

Listen to the full interview with Maximick below:

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Interviews:

We found the greatest Elvis impersonator in the world. He's in Williams Lake working with at-risk youth

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Morris Bates has been called "the Greatest Elvis Impersonator in the World" (YouTube)

Morris Bates was once known as "The Greatest Elvis Impersonator in the World." Today, the Williams Lake man is known more for his work with at-risk youth. Marissa Harvey shares his story:

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Interviews:

Totem project honours one of the most influential Haida artists of the 20th century

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Daybreak host George Baker tries his had at totem carving.

On a gravel road in the Kitsumkalum Canyon, artist Joe Mandur is chipping away at a special project. He is slowly carving a totem pole in honour of Freda Diesing, one of the most influential carvers of the 20th century. And Mandur is seeking a little help. Daybreak's George Baker has more on the artist's plans:

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Interviews:

Health Minister Terry Lake addresses closure of Fort St John walk-in clinic

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On April 30, the Fort St John Medical Clinic will close its walk-in clinic. Dr. Paul Mackey says the decision was made because doctors at the clinic no longer have enough time to care for their own patients, and that the number of doctors in the city has been declining as the population grows.

Terry Lake is the province's health minister. He says the province is working hard to attract and retain doctors in rural communities, and the problems are not limited to Fort St John.

"It's not as easy as just snapping your fingers," he says of trying to fill the gaps.

Listen to the full interview with Terry Lake below:

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Interviews:

Lakeland president on mill explosion: "I will be eternally sorry"

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Lakeland president Greg Stewart speaks to media in March 2013 (CBC)
















On April 14, B.C.'s Criminal Justice Branch announced it will not be laying charges in the fire and explosion that killed 2 and injured 24 at the Lakeland Mills sawmill in Prince George in April 2012.

In a written statement, the Crown says no search warrants were obtained by WorkSafeBC during the investigation of the sawmill, and that a conviction would be unlikely.

Greg Stewart is president of Lakeland Mills. He says safety has always been a priority for his company. "On the night of April 23, 2012, we failed the expectations of our founders and most importantly our employees. For that, and for the impacts it has had on our employees, their families, and our community, I will be eternally sorry."

Stewart says he and his company did not know about the extent of the risks of sawdust prior to the explosion. "Had regulators provided us with the information prior to this incident, I am confident that our team would have responded appropriately to address any of the risks."

Listen to Lakeland president Greg Stewart speak to media:
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Stewart says Lakeland did attempt to address dust issues following an explosion at a mill in Burns Lake, but they did not have all the information they have now.

Speaking with Daybreak North on Tuesday, Stephen Hunt of the United Steelworkers Union says a number of Lakeland employees affected by the explosion feel frustrated by a lack of accountability.

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Coming Up:

Daybreak In Depth: Special series and documentaries

Home: the Housing Crisis of Northern B.C.

At Home in the Hood: Stories from Prince George's Inner City VLA

Tsunami Drift: the Aftermath of the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster in B.C.'s northwest


Cornering Gas: Inside the Shale Gas Industry

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Interviews:

Eagle Spirit Energy wants to offer an alternative to the Northern Gateway pipeline

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A new name in pipelines is in the race to move oil across B.C.'s north. Eagle Spirit Energy put its name in the hat as an alternative to Enbridge's Northern Gateway Project. Calvin Helin is chairperson and president of Eagle Spirit Energy. He speaks with Daybreak's George Baker.

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Interviews:

Workers unhappy with lack of charges in Lakeland Mills explosion

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A fire destroyed much of the Lakeland Mills sawmill in Prince George, B.C. (Andrew Johnson/Canadian Press)


There will be no charges in connection with the 2012 explosion at Lakeland Mills in Prince George, when two workers willed and 22 others injured. Stephen Hunt is the Western Canadian Director for the United Steelworkers Union, and he feels more needs to be done to bring workers closure and justice.

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Interviews, The Story Exchange:

Need to get your employees to respect you? Establish dominance over a grizzly bear

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Warning: confronting wild animals is not a recommended conflict resolution strategy

Drew Rogers makes a living as a treeplanter in B.C. forests. One year, he was having trouble gaining the respect of his crew when he received some unexpected help from a grizzly bear. Listen to his story below:

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Interviews:

Kitimat mayor says she will stand behind "no" vote on Northern Gateway

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Kitimat voters said "no" to the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline project this weekend. In a non-binding plebiscite on Saturday, 58.4 per cent of voters in Kitimat rejected supporting the controversial pipeline project.

Kitimat mayor Joanne Monaghan has not stated her personal opinion on the project, but says she will respect democracy. "I will stand behind them, but it doesn't mean I will throw myself in front of a bulldozer," she said in an interview with CBC Daybreak North's George Baker.

Listen to the full interview with Monaghan below:

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Interviews:

Kitimat votes on Northern Gateway pipeline

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Kitimat is holding a non-binding plebiscite on whether the community supports the Northern Gateway pipeline project.

On April 12, residents of Kitimat will vote on whether they support Enbridge's proposed Northern Gateway pipeline. It has no legal effect on whether the pipeline goes ahead, but is being closely watched by both proponents and opponents of the project. George Baker speaks with Donny Van Dyke, who is for the project, and Murray Minchin, who is against.

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Interviews:

Northern Health wants fluoride to stay in Prince George water

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Prince George is planning a referendum on tap water fluoridation during the upcoming fall municipal elections. (CBC)

With the city of Prince George gearing up for a referendum on putting fluoride in tap water (and a class action lawsuit against the city before the courts), Northern Health is defending the practice. "It's a well-proven, well-researched method of reducing dental caries," says Brenda Matsen, Northern Health's program manager for preventative public health dental programs. 

"If you have money, you have choice," she says of people who don't want fluoride in tap water. "The people that don't have money like low income, seniors on fixed income, children in vulnerable families, they don't have a choice. Fluoridation reaches them. If you're an adult and you don't have a dental plan, there is nothing to help."

Listen to the full interview below:

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Interviews:

Minister Coleman says government will be ready to fill the gaps in housing and health when LNG boom comes north

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B.C. Minister of Energy and Mines and Minister Responsible for Housing Rich Coleman (CBC).

The Minister of Energy and Mines and Minister Responsible for Housing Rich Coleman is visiting Prince George today to discuss the liquefied natural gas industry. He says he's confident B.C. is on track to have multiple LNG facilities completed by 2020, despite challengers from around the world.

"We're competing against central Africa, Mozambique, Australia, Qatar, other countries like that with regards to trying to build this industry. But the feedback I'm getting right now is B.C. is definitely globally competitive."

When asked about the difficulty of finding housing and rising rents in B.C.'s northwest, Coleman said his government is paying attention.

"There's always a challenge when you get growth," he says. "We can identify what the needs and gaps are... but until we actually see a final investment decision where someone's actually going to build an LNG plant, you really are just getting ready by having all your fundamentals in place, which we will have in place."

Listen to the full interview below:


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Interviews:

College of New Caledonia daycare could be closing

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A daycare is on a list of proposed cuts at the College of New Caledonia. CNC spokesperson Randall Heidt says the school can no longer afford to operate a daycare that is running at a loss. But Jessica Marshall, who has both used and worked at the daycare, says it is an essential part of helping parents who study and work at CNC.

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Interviews:

Prince George band Black Spruce Bog will jump in a river and give you Christmas dinner for cash

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Black Spruce Bog are offering some innovative incentives to fund the recording of a new album.

We've all heard it's tough for musicians to make money these days, and more and more are turning to crowd-funding and innovative products to get by. Take Prince George's Black Spruce Bog: in addition to selling vinyl and t-shirts, they are offering videos of themselves jumping in the river, and Christmas dinner with their drummer's mom.

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You can find Black Spruce Bog on their website.http://blacksprucebog.com/

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Interviews:

Is there a future for forestry in B.C.?

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Critics say that large companies are over harvesting B.C. forests, putting the future of the industry at the risk. (CBC)

Is there still a future for forestry in the north? Dozens of mills have shut down, and tens of thousands of mill workers and loggers have lost their jobs.

As part of the Stand Up for the North committee, Peter Ewart is helping organize public forums on the future of forestry. He worries proposed changes to forestry rules could put just a few big companies in charge of logging B.C., and that local communities need more control over how forests are managed. Listen to the full conversation below:

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Interviews:

Olympic medalist Denny Morrison on the good and the bad of growing up in Fort St John

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Olympic speed skater Denny Morrison at the Pomeroy Sports Centre in Fort St John (CBC). 

Denny Morrison won silver and bronze medals at the most recent Olympics games in Sochi. Now, the speed-skater is visiting his hometown of Fort St John.

"Fort St John is where it all started for me," he says. "So it's cool to just stay involved with the local community there, and the schools, and the clubs, and I guess lots of people, young kids there know my name so it's cool to come say 'hi' to them."

While Morrison is proud of his hometown, he's not proud about everything in his past. He made headlines when a gay nightclub in Calgary sponsored him at the Olympics, amid anti-homosexuality laws in Russia.

"Growing up... being a speedskater in what's predominanty a hockey-playing city, people would insinuate that I was gay and call me figure skater and just tease and bully me. I could usually overcome it, but it made me a little sensitive to the issue. And I wanted to prove how not gay I was by perhaps saying and doing some things which were anti-gay, perhaps. And I regret that now, and I look back on that with a lot of disappointment."

Listen to the full conversation, including why Morrison believes there should be more bike lanes in Canada:

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Interviews:

More patients and fewer doctor leads to closure of walk-in clinic in Fort St John

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The Fort St John medical clinic will no longer see walk-in patients starting April 30, 2014 (fsjmedicalclinic.com) Getting a doctor in Fort St John is about to become even more difficult. On April 30, the Fort St John Medical Clinic will no longer welcome walk-in patients. Dr. Paul Mackey says the decision was made because doctors at the clinic no longer have enough time to care for the patients they already have. He says that as the population of Fort St John is increasing, the number of doctors is decreasing. He speaks with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata about the challenges, and we also hear from Fort St John mayor Lori Ackerman.

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Interviews:

Why aren't there more fast food restaurants in Prince Rupert?

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McDonald's is one of just three fast food options in Prince Rupert, and the only one with a drive-thru. (Gene J. Puskar/Associated Press).

Northwestern B.C. is booming... but not when it comes to fast food. In Prince Rupert, there are only three fast food restaurants, and local residents have to travel to Terrace and beyond to satisfy their cravings for Wendy's, A&W, KFC, and Dairy Queen. So why isn't there more fast food in the city of rainbows? George Baker unwraps the story. Listen below:

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Interviews:

If you plan on protesting, the BCCLA wants you to know your rights

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Protesters against Enbridge's proposed Northern Gateway pipeline are shown gathering outside the Joint Review Panel's final argument hearings in Terrace, B.C., in June 2013. A B.C. civil liberties group says documents show that police and CSIS conducted unconstitutional and possibly illegal actions by gathering information on peaceful activists who opposed the pipeline. (Robin Rowland/CP)

With tensions mounting over various natural resource projects in northern B.C., a number of people have threatened to blockades protests. Now the B.C. Civil Liberties Association is touring northern B.C. to people about their rights when it comes to protesting. Daybreak's George Baker speaks to Josh Paterson, executive director of the BCCLA.


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Interviews:

Are enough professionals being trained in northern B.C.?

Plans to expand physiotherapy training in northern B.C. are on hold, and that has one of the people pushing for the program unhappy. Dr. Bert Kelly is the executive director of the Northern Medical Society, and he says the need is urgent.

"It's almost impossible," to get a physiotherapist in northern British Columbia Kelly told CBC, adding he's not sure if there are any working outside of Prince George.

Kelly sees the lack of funding for a physiotherapy program in northern B.C. as part of a larger problem of not training professionals for the north in the north.

"The professional engineers in Prince George have been trying to get an engineering program at UNBC, this is badly needed just the same as the physiotherapy program is badly needed... for better than a hundred years now we've been training professionals in the Lower Mainland hoping that they will move north, but they don't," says Kelly.  "So they have to go offshore to get people like me and my colleagues."

Listen to the full interview below:

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Interviews:

Economic boom in northwest B.C. means less paramedics for rural communities

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An official with the Village of Queen Charlotte says that as more high-paying jobs come to northwestern B.C., it is getting more difficult to attract and retain people to work as paramedics. Peter Weber is the chief administrative officer for the Village, and he says the community ambulance service is down to roughly 50% capacity. George Baker speaks with him, as well as Mike Michalko of B.C. Ambulance.

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New research indicates wind farms safe for northeast B.C. birds

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Photo courtesy UNBC Centre for Wind Energy and the Environment

New research from the University of Northern British Columbia indicates that wind farms built in the mountains of northeastern B.C. have very little effect on local birds and bats. Listen to Ken Otter explain his research:

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Learn more about wind energy research on the website for UNBC's Centre for Wind Energy and the Environment.

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Interviews, The Story Exchange:

A comedy career begins at Prince George Idol

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Today, Chris Gaskin is a comedian touring across Canada. But once upon a time, he was just a struggling stand-up in Prince George who had an unlikely day at the fair...

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Interviews:

Celebrating 100 years of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway

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An archival photo from April 7, 1914 courtesy of the Northern B.C. Archives.

April 7, 2014 marks 100 years since the last spike was driven in the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, connecting Prince Rupert to Prince George and through to Winnipeg, and opening up northern British Columbia.

Harry Home is an engineer who worked with some of the men who helped build the railway. He believes trains are still the best way to travel, and that it was the vision of those who helped build the Grand Trunk that led to northwestern's B.C. current economic boom.


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Interviews:

Chris Hadfield on why he won't bungee jump, Russia, and what dead pine trees look like from space

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Chris Hadfield will be at the Exploration Place museum at Bob Ewart Memorial Dinner in Prince George Saturday, April 5.










Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield is a busy man. From the stages of the TED Talks conference to university campuses to the Juno Awards, he is in demand as a speaker around the world. "That's how you get stuff done," he says when asked how he keeps up his schedule. "I was a lot busier as an astronaut."

Hadfield rose to fame as the social-media savvy commander of the International Space Station, though he says he had already had a taste of celebrity. "When I first flew in space back in 1995, it was quite celebrated. I was on the cover of Time Magazine, and since then schools have been named after me, and postage stamps and things. It's not like it just suddenly began."

In all parts of life Hadfield says preparation is key so you expect the unexpected.

"[It's] what keeps an astronaut alive," he says. "A lot of people view test pilots and astronauts as daredevils or adrenaline junkies or something. In fact, we're just the opposite." 

"To me one of the most interesting things is life is to be able to do something that is complicated, that has a level of risk involved, but to be able to to do it with a high probability of success because you've figured out how."

Which means certain activities are off-limits.

"I would never bungee jump. There's no skill. A sack of flour could bungee jump just as well as I could... That just doesn't appeal to me."

To hear Chris Hadfield's thoughts on risk, Russia, and what northern B.C. looks like from outer space, listen to the interview below: 

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Chris Hadfield will be at the Exploration Place museum in Prince George from 11:30 until 1 on Saturday, April 5. He will then be delivering the keynote address at the Dr. Bob Ewart Memorial Dinner at the Prince George Civic Centre from 5:30 pm to 11 pm.

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Interviews:

Conservative MP Bob Zimmer on the Victims Bill of Rights

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The Victims Bill of Rights is up for debate in Canada's Parliament. The proposed bill provides additional protection for the victims of crime, but it could also require spouses to testify against their significant others.

This aspect of the bill has some who work with women and girls concerned.  "I would worry for example that forcing women to testify against abusive spouses could not only dissuade them from reporting crime in the first place, but might put them at greater risk throughout that process," said ​Kasari Govender, the executive director of the West Coast Legal Education and Action Fund, in an interview with CBC News.

Prince George-Peace River MP Bob Zimmer believes the criticism is misguided and the new legislation is needed to put the focus back on the victims.

"Often the criminals get recognized, it's their rights that get recognized, and it's all about them."

The bill also gives every victim the right to financial compensation from the offender.

"The key is the criminal understands that we're gonna come after you if you're going to do this to a victim, and the victim also has recognized that we're going to bat for you for restitution."

When asked about the number of changes to the criminal code contained in the bill, Zimmer said, "When you're doing a Victims Bill of Rights, it's a pretty comprehensive bill and we need to get it right the first time."

Listen to Bob Zimmer's interview with CBC's George Baker below:

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Extra:

Northern Health trying to contain noro virus-like illness in northwest B.C.


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Health officials in northwest BC are contending with an outbreak of a norovirus-like illness. 

The highly contagious infection may be responsible for a number of sick people in Kitimat and Terrace, and there are reports of at least one death from a work camp in Kitimat.  

However, Health officials say if there was a death, the norovirus likely didn't cause it. They also say the virus doesn't typically cause death, and is mostly a nuisance.

Number of sick unknown

Spokesperson Jonathon Dyck says it isn't clear how many people have the virus. 

"Because it is circulating around the community at present, there could be people that have it that are staying home and that are taking care of themselves that way before the virus passes. So, exact numbers are not available at this time."


Officials say the virus is highly contagious. Some of the symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach cramps.

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Interviews:

Have a bad prom when you were in high school? How about a redo?

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photo courtesy CBC Music

Prom is usually a once in a lifetime experience. 

And sometimes that experience isn't so great.

But this week, people in Prince George have a chance for a re-do. Daybreak's Audrey McKinnon tells you how, and brings us stories of proms gone wrong.

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How was your prom? Would you have a redo?

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Interviews:

Northern B.C. Music Archives: The Best of Barkerville, raunchy Fort St John blues, and Tsimshian death metal

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Some of the albums in the Northern B.C. Audio Archives

Once a month on Daybreak we check in with Karl Domes. He's with the Northern B.C. Audio Archive project, and he delves into the vaults to share some of the north's musical past and present. Today, a new release from Fort St John's Miss Quincy, Tsimshian death metal, and a 1967 album called "The Best of Barkerville." Have a listen below:

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10 things the president of UNBC wants you to know about the $400,000 budget shortfall

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The University of Northern British Columbia has $400,000 less in its budget this year. We spoke to interim president Mark Dale about why, and what it means for the university's future, tuition fees, and the possibility of an engineering program in the north.

Listen to UNBC interim president Mark Dale in conversation with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata

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1. There's less money from the province

"There are a number of factors, but probably the easiest one to explain is that we have a reduction in the grant from the provincial government," Dale says. While that can be mitigated by working with other schools, "it's a bit more of a challenge for a small and relatively isolated university compared to what a university in the Lower Mainland might be able to do."

2. New universities in southern B.C. are siphoning off students that might have moved north

"Our enrollment is not increasing, and so the tuition is not rising." Dale says less young people are going to university as they are taking up jobs in the trades. He also notes that newer universities such as Thompson Rivers and Vancouver Island University are attracting students who may have once come north to UNBC. "I think when UNBC started the proportion of students that were from the south of the province was something like 24 percent, or certainly over 20. But now it's down to 10 percent or below."

3. There will be less jobs at UNBC

Dale says there are a number of vacancies at UNBC that will not be filled. While he wouldn't discuss which positions are being cut, he says they will be on both the administrative and teaching/research side. "I think it's across the board."

4. Tuition is going up

To help make up for the shortfall, tuition at UNBC will be going up by 2 percent, the maximum allowed by the province. "What a student would be looking at is an increase of about $96 a year."

5. Tuition is only one of the costs preventing more people from going to school

"The expenses that students face are many, and tuition is a relatively small component," Dale says. "We know, for example, that part of the reason students don't come from the south of the province is not wanting to pay rent and transportation and things like that."


6. As a young university, UNBC is able to offer less scholarships and bursaries

One way to help offset the costs of tuition is through scholarships and bursaries, but: "UNBC is at a bit of a disadvantage compared to other universities, though, in that it is relatively young. And so compared to small universities in the Maritimes, for example, which have been in existence for hundreds of years, they have built up through donations a number of endowed funds." 

7. UNBC is going to focus on attracting international students, Albertans, and grad students

"[Alberta] has interesting problems of its own with funding being decreased, so we suspect there are students that are close to our natural catchment in Alberta that would be very interested in coming to a high-quality university like UNBC," says Dale. He also says the number of graduate students interested in UNBC is high for a small northern school and there will be more focus on them, as well as international students.

8. The value of a degree isn't going anywhere

Just because there is a focus on oil, gas and trades in B.C.'s economic strategy right now, Dale believes a university degree is as valuable as ever. "What is required is not just the people who are working on the pipelines, but the people who are doing the planning, the people who are looking after the infrastructure, the people who are looking after the people... there's a whole long list of professional skills that are required, and that's where universities come in."

9. There are still plans for an engineering program to be created at UNBC -- if the money can be found

"There is no way UNBC could come up with the number of positions internally that would be required to provide engineering. Engineering is relatively expensive to put on, it requires specialized infrastructure as well as highly-trained professionals to do the instruction. So it's not a cheap program to put on, but I think it's something that the north really needs and we've heard this from industry, we've heard it from the population in general. It's something that's needed and we would like to see it go forward, but it's going to require some investment on the part of the province."

10. More cuts could be coming

"I would like to say that I think they [funding issues] have stabilized, I don't think they have. We have been told that another budget reduction is certainly possible in the future." Dale says UNBC is now turning its focus to choosing its priorities for going into the future.

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Friday: Chris Hadfield touches down on Daybreak

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Astronaut Chris Hadfield will be on Daybreak Friday, April 4 and delivering the keynote at UNBC's Dr. Bob Ewert Memorial Lecture and Dinner on Saturday, April 5 (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)