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March 2014 Archives

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Ultimate Daybreak Dish part 2

That fennel salad is going to need something... oh yeah! Some fish!

Here is Adrienne's halibut "Built-in Sauce" recipe:

You will need slightly different equipment and your oven; hopefully it holds an accurate 
and steady temperature.

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.For each serving of halibut you will need:

--  One tablespoon of chopped fresh herbs such as parsley, dill, tarragon, fennel tops and 

chives.

-- A mixture of all these is great but you can adjust according to your own taste.

-- Kosher salt to your own taste

--One tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil

--One quarter teaspoon of fresh ground black pepper or a fat pinch of chile flakes (or both)

--Two teaspoons of white balsamic vinegar

--One half teaspoon of Dijon mustard

--One piece of halibut 

--One 12 inch square of parchment paper

Mix together the herbs, salt, pepper&/ chile flakes, olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Fold your paper in half, crease it and open it out. Place it on your counter with the crease running vertically. Place the fish on the right hand half of the fold and brush it with the Djon mustard. Pour on the herb mixture.

 Fold the left hand side of the paper over the fish and starting from the bottom make small folds, folding the edges together to enclose the fish in a package. When you get to the end just twist the ends to seal it.

 It will stay sealed. Place the package/s on a cookie sheet. You can fit four on a sheet.Place them in the middle of the oven and set the timer for 12 minutes. When the time is up simply remove the packages to the plate, cut open and serve. This is most effective when the package is opened at the table in front of the diner so that they receive the full impact of the aromatic steam coming out of the parchment.

So, now your meal consists of an appetizer of cavapcici in small pita breads, with lightly 
pickled red onions and stir fried baby peppers, a fresh fennel salad and parchment cooked 
halibut with an herb sauce.

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Interviews:

Over one hundred people make autistic boy's birthday wish come true

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Jeaden Pacquette overlooks the crowd that came out to celebrate his twelfth birthday (Cherise Wilson-Levesque/Facebook)

For his twelfth birthday, Jeaden Pacquette's biggest wish was to not celebrate alone. Pacquette has autism, and trouble making friends. So his mother turned to the community for help- and she found it. Marissa Harvey shares the story.


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Ex Prince George fire chief will head Winnipeg fire service

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Former Prince George, B.C. fire chief John Lane speaks to media after Lakeland Mills fire in 2012 (Photo Credit: Wil Fundal/CBC) 

The former chief of the Prince George Fire Rescue Service will soon command Winnipeg firefighters. 

John Lane quietly resigned from his high profile post in northern B.C. in August of 2013. He had served as the chief since June 2011. 

"He really knows the value of fire based EMS and he's also a firefighter throughout his career," says Alex Forrest.

He heads the union representing Winnipeg fire fighters. "So I believe it's going to be a good fit for Winnipeg."

Lane replaces Reid Douglas who was fired by the city of Winnipeg amid a fire hall scandal.

In Prince George, John Iverson has been promoted to chief after serving as deputy chief. 

For more, visit New chief hired for Winnipeg Fire Paramedic Service

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There are costs to be paid to perform Les Miserables in Prince Rupert

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Performers in Prince Rupert's Les Miserables aren't paid peanuts -- they are paid in jube-jubes! Daybreak's George Baker has that and more From the Coast. 



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Interviews:

Day's End at the Days Inn

Ladles Soup and Sandwich, George the barber, and Riley's Pub in search of new homes

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The Days Inn (formerly the Simon Fraser Inn) in downtown Prince George is shutting its doors ahead of a planned sale and renovation.

The Days Inn Hotel (formerly the Simon Fraser Inn) in Prince George is closing its doors. The plan is for it to be sold but before that can happen everything, including some long-time tenants must be cleared out.

Listen to George the barber and other tenants of the Days Inn talk about their future plans:
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George the barber

This includes George K. Blanis, who opened his barbershop in the hotel with his father in October 1964. He was hoping to celebrate 50 years at the location, but was given three weeks notice that he had to gone by the end of March.

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"George the barber" cuts the hair of a longtime customer. After nearly fifty years in this location, he has to clear out by the end of March.

"It changed my life," he says. "Unfortunately I know I'm not going to be a barber forever, but I was hoping to get my fiftieth year here, would have been nice to tell everyone in Prince George and all the friends and customers, more or less all the citizens of Prince George, thank them for the years they've supported me."

At age 77, Blanis is hoping to find a partner and celebrate fifty years in the city in a new location.

"Stay tuned, that's all I can say."

Riley's Pub

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Riley's Pub is hoping to reopen in a new location after leaving the Days Inn.

Riley's Pub is also hoping their closure will be temporary. For the past two years, bartender and manager Justin Basi has been building a community at the pub, holding concerts, blues nights and even meatdraws in partnership with different community groups.

"Just a nice place where people can come in, have drinks, and enjoy music from some great bands from around here," is how Basi describes the pub.

Basi's looking on the bright side, though. He's scouting out new locations where the pub can reopen, better than ever.

"It's always going to be that place, when you walk by it'll be 'oh yeah, that was Riley's'," he says. "But I'm more excited to move on and try to open another place that I think is a better location."

Ladles Soup and Sandwich

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Happy customers from around the world have covered the counter at Ladles with signatures and messages marking their visits.

While George's and Riley's are hoping to reopen in a new location, the closing of the Days Inn could also spell the end for the popular Ladles Soup and Sandwich.

Chef and owner Sean Mears was already planning on leaving before he got word of the impending shutdown. He's engaged and planning on moving to Prince Edward Island after the wedding. But he had hoped to have more time to try and find a new owner- he says he's having a tough time making a sale without a new location.

Even if Mears does find someone to take over, his sole employee Shane Ziglin isn't sure things would be quite the same without Mears behind the ladle.

"He gets here at like three in the mornings, and he's still making the soups, like they're not totally finished by ten."

Mears has thought about writing down the recipes, but he's not sure what use they would be since he never takes measurements. Not that this method has caused him any trouble- Ziglin says its common for a line to start at 11 with no chance to slow down before they close at 2.

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For now, fans of Mears' soup are making sure they get one final taste. One man ordered four days worth of his favourite flavour.

A few years ago, Mears put up a small sign saying "Best Soup in Town: If you agree, please sign." Before long, the whole thing was covered, so people started writing on the wall and counter.

Today, there are hundreds of signatures from people all around the world sprawled out here.

"Came here with my driving instructor before my test," reads one message. "Wish me luck."
 
"Feeding my four month baby belly," says another.

Sean's not sure what he's going to do with these messages when he leaves. Like George the barber, he's hoping some portions of his shop might be worth preserving in the local museum.

One of the newest messages is written on a door, away from the jumble of the rest.

It reads simply, "Gonna miss this place Sean."

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We're building a Daybreak Dish you can enjoy -- and... er... make yourself

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...And along the way we're picking out key ingredients, including this mutant green onion thing that is actually something called Fennel.

This herb has a thick white base, stalk which darken to green the further they grow from the base. 

Fennel has a black licorice flavour to it, but mixed with salt or lemon, it can taste quite nice, says Daybreak's Coastal Cooking Columnist. You'll have to take Adrienne's word on that (she is after all a celebrated chef and former owner of Cow Bay Cafe).

"My favourite way to prepare fennel is in a salad. It can be cooked, but, to me, it becomes too sweet and loses the savoury edge to which I so look forward," says Johnston.

Well, here is her recipe for fennel salad:

WASH AND TRIM A FRESH FENNEL; BULB. 

TO TRIM IT, REMOVE A THIN SLICE FROM THE BOTTOM, CUT THE BULB IN HALF ALONG THE LENGTH. 

REMOVE AND SAVE THE SOLID CORE. REMOVE AND SAVE SOME OF THE DARKER GREEN STALKS AND REMOVE ALL THE LITTLE FRONDS. PLACE THE FRONDS ON A PAPER TOWEL TO DRY.

SLICE THE BULB INTO PAPER-THIN SLICES. SLICE THE CORE INTO PAPER THIN SLCICES AND ALSO SOME OF THE STALKS. PLACE THE SLICED FENNEL IN A BOWL AND LIGHTLY SALT WITH A FLAKY KOSHER SALT.

WASH AND DRY A LEMON AND GRATE THE ZEST INTO THE FENNEL SLICES. DRIZZLE THE LOT WITH THE BEST OLIVE OIL YOU CAN FIND, I USE THE EXTRA VIRGIN SQUEEZE OVER THE JUICE OF HALF THE LEMON. BE CAREFUL NOT TO GET THE SEEDS IN AS THEY ARE A PAIN TO REMOVE AND IF YOU BITE INTO ONE IT WILL BE VERY BITTER AND COARSE. GRIND ON SOME FRESH BLACK PEPPER. MIX THE LOT WELL, USING A LIGHT HAND. 

SEED AND CHOP A HANDFUL OF SUN DRIED BLACK OLIVES.

TO PLATE THE SALAD, PLACE THE MOUND OF THE FENNEL MIXTURE ON A PLATE, STREW A FEW CHOPPED BLACK OLIVES AROUND, STREW ON SOME OF THE FENNEL FRONDS AND DRIZZLE ON A LITTLE MORE OLIVE OIL. TO ELEVATE THIS SALAD TO THE SUBLIME, SPRINKLE OVER A LITTLE FENNEL POLLEN.

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Interviews:

What do you do if a famous person wants your Twitter account?

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Jamie Bell is the name of a musician in Prince George. His Twitter handle is @jamiebell.

Jamie Bell is also the name of a Hollywood actor who has starred in Billy Elliot, King Kong, and the upcoming Fantastic Four. He joined Twitter after @jamiebell, so he goes by the name @1jamiebell.

Recently, Jamie Bell the musician received a message from Jamie Bell the actor asking "OK, how much do you want for it?" Ironically, this isn't the first time the actor has reached out to the musician- they had an exchange back in the MySpace days, as well.

What will Jamie Bell the musician do? Listen below:

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You can listen to some of Jamie's music here:
 

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Interviews:

"poem commissioned by CBC for World Poet Day, International Day of Forests, and the International Day for the Elimination of Racism--all today" by Jeremy Stewart

March 21 is International Day of Forests. It's also International Day for the Elimination of Racism. And it's World Poetry Day. How to celebrate all three?

We turned to Prince George poet Jeremy Stewart for help, and he came back with something he says is "flarf", a type of poetry that uses semi-random words and phrases from the internet to create a work of art.

"For this piece I Googled combinations of the terms 'poets', 'racism', 'forests' and variants on those to get little bits of language which I could use to combine into something," he says.

We've shared the result below. Stewart is the author of flood basement and the upcoming Hidden City, which won the Robert Kroetsch Award for innovative poetry.

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"poem commissioned by CBC for World Poet Day, International Day of Forests, and the International Day for the Elimination of Racism--all today" by Jeremy Stewart

Read poems on racism. Best racism poems. 
Poem about racisms.
Consider the issue of racism in the light in the forest.

Hundreds of poets are putting their verse together 
to keep a 10-hectare forest slated 
for development by Langley council intact.

We started in summer 2009 with about half a dozen of us sitting 
round a table in Ye Olde Rose and Crown trying 
to avoid the (otherwise lovely)

yet again, a community--this time, Waltham Forest--is coming together
to tell the racists that they are not welcome. For more than three years
I have been reading some disturbing poems

posts/blogs/comments
about how Forest Grove is racist 
and how there are white supremacists in the area

The poet not only grew up in a racist environment
a descendant of slaveowners, but also followed 
(without always embracing) forms of quote ethnological science

police have warned fans heading for tomorrow night's 
match between Nottingham Forest and Leicester City 
that racist chanting will not be

get blazed as hell and go mudding in Forest Lake
this results in a substantial proportion of the student 
body being incredibly racist

it's a town where kids who aren't smart 
enough to spend their time more productively
use sexist, classist, racist or homophobic language; libel or defame; bully or troll.

Are all of Maya Angelou's poems about racism?
Why did Maya Angelou write books and poems?
The Conservative Party cloaks its inherent racism behind more creative language

I didn't really think Poem Forest would make me feel better, but
Harper used her prestige and writings 
to fight racism and also make a strong feminist

This isn't racist...it's more like a lament. 
Anti-racist education works 
to counter and dismantle all forms

marvel at the overachieving beaver, applaud the race-winning snail
I explored the rainforest; I discovered the people.
Background and a rejection of colonial racism and oppression.

Being in forests also produces positive effects on
a large and rapidly growing body of evidence
when people spent time in nature it decreased sick days
to keep a 10-hectare forest slated 
for development by Langley council intact.

We started in summer 2009 with about half a dozen of us sitting 
round a table in Ye Olde Rose and Crown trying 
to avoid the (otherwise lovely)

yet again, a community--this time, Waltham Forest--is coming together
to tell the racists that they are not welcome. For more than three years
I have been reading some disturbing poems

posts/blogs/comments
about how Forest Grove is racist 
and how there are white supremacists in the area

The poet not only grew up in a racist environment
a descendant of slaveowners, but also followed 
(without always embracing) forms of quote ethnological science

police have warned fans heading for tomorrow night's 
match between Nottingham Forest and Leicester City 
that racist chanting will not be

get blazed as hell and go mudding in Forest Lake
this results in a substantial proportion of the student 
body being incredibly racist

it's a town where kids who aren't smart 
enough to spend their time more productively
use sexist, classist, racist or homophobic language; libel or defame; bully or troll.

Are all of Maya Angelou's poems about racism?
Why did Maya Angelou write books and poems?
The Conservative Party cloaks its inherent racism behind more creative language

I didn't really think Poem Forest would make me feel better, but
Harper used her prestige and writings 
to fight racism and also make a strong feminist

This isn't racist...it's more like a lament. 
Anti-racist education works 
to counter and dismantle all forms

marvel at the overachieving beaver, applaud the race-winning snail
I explored the rainforest; I discovered the people.
Background and a rejection of colonial racism and oppression.

Being in forests also produces positive effects on
a large and rapidly growing body of evidence
when people spent time in nature it decreased sick days

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Interviews:

Watch orcas hunting sea lions near Prince Rupert

The YouTube video shows a pod of orcas hunting sea lions near a sportfishing boat on Wednesday near Prince Rupert B.C.

Travis Twizell and Kim Lundberg live in Prince George, but they recently decided to take their kids on a trip to Prince Rupert to do some whale-watching. What they didn't know was it is the off-season, and they couldn't find a tourism operator to take them out on the water.

Eventually they found a private operator who warned them they may not see anything.

Instead, they had a rare close encounter- a group of sea lions came up to their boat, followed by a group of orcas. Kim says they idled for about two hours, and the sea lions were so close you could reach out and touch them. 

Things got really exciting when the boat started moving, and that's where this video begins. We'll let you see for yourself (warning: there is some profanity at the beginning of the video):
 

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Interviews:

This artist had given up on his dreams until his friend bought him a new canvas... and a new start

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Some of Parenteau's work on display.

Larry Parenteau had a rough upbringing. As a child he lived in foster homes, and as an adult he lived on the street. To escape, he turned to the world of art. 

At first he just doodled with crayons and pencils, but he later turned to creating bright paintings inspired by the natural world, and his First Nations heritage. But while the art came easy, he had a tough time getting anyone to pay attention.

"I got tired of standing on the street corner trying to sell them. Nobody wanted to come near me, let alone try to buy something off me because of the way I look."

With tattoos and a Mohawk, people avoided Parenteau, and eventually he gave up. Then his friend Whitney Prouse challenged him to get back in the game, and offered to be his agent. Daybreak's Audrey McKinnon tells the story of what happened next:

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Interviews:

Therapy dog killed by bear mourned

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Loki the pitbull worked with a variety of clients as a therapy dog (pawsitivehorizons.com).

On March 9th, a therapy dog named Loki encountered a bear near Prince George. Loki fought with the bear for nearly half an hour before conservation officers arrived to subdue the bear.
Kirby MacInnes owned and trained Loki. She believes Loki was protecting her husband and the other dogs he was walking. 

"In his own way he was protecting his family.... He was in the fight of his life." 

Listen to MacInnes talk about Loki's life and legacy

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Loki was taken to vet, where he died from his injuries.

"He was comforting me in the end," says MacInnes. "I was able to put my head up against his." 

McInnes is not the only one mourning Loki. He was a therapy dog who had clients ranging from youth custody to transition houses. MacInnes says Loki could always make a connection.

"I think the fact that Loki was a pitbull and an often misunderstood breed and the stigma with that, our clients were able to connect with that, too." 

MacInnes and her husband are now working on starting a fund in Loki's memory. The money will be used to help provide vet care to pet owners who can't afford it.

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Updated: Road to UNBC re-opened

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Update, 11:15 am. RCMP say the road to UNBC has now been re-opened. They confirm they have disposed of what they are calling an improvised explosive device.

RCMP have closed the road leading to the University of Northern British Columbia campus in Prince George from Foothills Boulevard.
Late last night RCMP in Prince George received reports of a  device on the road leading to the University of Northern British Columbia from Foothills Boulevard. Officers did attend and  the explosive disposal unit is now en route from Vancouver. 

In the meantime the road is closed to all vehicles and foot traffic, and is expected to remain closed for hours. 

The university remains open and accessible via Tyner Boulevard. 

RCMP say the device is small, and they do not believe the university to be at risk.

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"Dramatic and sudden" spike in deaths of Canadian men once they reach legal drinking age

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A University of Northern British Columbia researcher believes over thirty deaths a year could be prevented if the minimum drinking age were raised to 21 across Canada. 

Russell Callaghan is an Associate Professor at UNBC. He helped lead study that found a "dramatic and sudden" 10-15 percent spike in deaths among young men once they reach legal drinking age. 

However, he admits the idea of raising the legal drinking age may not be popular. 

"I think there's going to be political resistance to that, and there may be other ways to get those public health gains. For example, raising the zero percent blood alcohol content laws for young drivers, not allowing any alcohol content among young drivers say, less than 22 years of age."

The same pattern in death spikes was not seen in Canadian women.

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Interviews:

An abandoned baby, friendly drunks, and hot chocolate: these are the memories of a veteran bus driver in Prince George

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Bob McCauley is getting ready to retire after 42 years behind the wheel of a bus in Prince George. (Shaam Semere/CBC)

"Transit Driver Appreciation Day" may not sound that interesting, but the stories from transit drivers are. Bob McCauley has spent 42 years driving a bus in Prince George, and he's seen some surprising things. Shaam Semere goes along for a ride.

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Interviews:

Resource safety advocate MaryAnne Arcand dies at age 59

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MaryAnne Arcand worked with the Central Interior Logging Assocation and the B.C. Forest Safety Council. (B.C. Forest Safety Council)
A champion for worker safety in B.C. has died.

MaryAnne Arcand was well known for her work as executive director of the Central Interior Logging Association and B.C.'s Forest Safety Council.

Family members say she succumbed to cancer Monday afternoon at the age of 59.

Kathleen Meise worked as her personal assistant for 10 years and is speaking on behalf of the family.

She says Arcand's tireless work to reduce the number of people killed in B.C.'s resource industries earned her the nickname "the Bulldozer."

"She didn't let anything stop her. If something needed to be done or fixed or changed or rewritten she would plough right through and get it done."

Arcand had a background in social services, primarily public health, safety and substance abuse. She was a frequent speaker at resource and leadership conferences.

Meise says some of Arcand's proudest moments were when she was working with youth through her involvement the Rotary Club, and when she improved safety standards for men and women working in resource industries- and that her dedication was recognized by those she helped.

"We couldn't go anywhere without hugs and handshakes."

Arcand's family says memorial arrangements are being finalized.

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Interviews:

Was Prince George's core services review worth the time and money?


Prince George core services review was designed to save money increase efficiency. Over two years and $300,000 later, was it worth it? Prince George Citizen editor Neil Godbout thinks the idea had merit, but the execution was lacking.

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Interviews:

When focusing on the positives of northern B.C. becomes a bad thing

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The Facebook banners for "Hell Yeah Prince George" which promotes positivity, and "WTF Prince George," a page that wants to "share the positive with the negative."

In just a few days, the Facebook page Hell Yeah Prince George has gained over seven thousand members. It has just one rule: any negative posts will be deleted. But some people worry that focusing on nothing but the positives can actually be negative. We speak with "Hell Yeah Prince George" creator Scott McWalter, and Bryce Lokken, a marketer and social media professional who sees a downside to too much positivity.

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External links:


Listener comments:

Gord Gauthier:

"Can't work to better a community with out seeing all sides of it. Yes some people and post go off on a tangent. Some not pleasing to all. I choose not to let every whiner get me down,just move on. But is great when one has a issue and we work together to help, not sweep it away."

Rae-Lynn Olson:

"I think you need to have the good with the bad. The positive only posts rule is taken too far - bordering censorship. There are absolute great things about every town, but without discussing the problems that all places have, how are we supposed to be aware, and be able to address these problems?"

Devon Wigglesworth:

"Why do you have to accept negativity?  Positive attitudes produce positive attitudes.  Negative produce same.  Unfortunately we have too much negativity in the news and other media, web pages and Facebook pages!  It's nice to find a refreshing point of shelter from all the negativity!  'Fort St John Rules' is our local page that does the same.  There should be more sites like this.  We listen every day to harsh things going on in the world.  Ukraine invasion, missing airplanes, abductions and abuse of women on the Highway of Tears, these things I hear everyday.  This is a beacon of happiness and joy in our negative media!"

Maggie Jo:

 "No one is hiding their heads in sand here by participating in positive posts-only sites - and quite frankly, they most likely lead happier lives even while they are all most likely consciously consumed/aware of what is going on in their midst. Sometimes we just need a break from all the negativity and problems to veg out in a more positive forum. Nothing wrong with 'dat. Frankly...please bring MORE positive sites."

Michael Nichols:

"There are all kinds of opportunities to note the negative about anything. If a person creates a page to emphasize the positive and edit out the negative that's entirely his right. Those who wish to broadcast the negative are free to start their own page. I disagree that people are afraid to complain. I see and here it all the time. I think people are more reluctant to offer praise."

Walter Fricke:

"Every town has it's perpetually complaining crowd. A town is what you make of it. You can make it great or you can make it terrible. It's up to you."

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Home: the Housing Crisis of Northern B.C., Interviews:

Home: Inside the housing crisis of northern B.C.

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Northwest B.C. is going through a housing crisis. 
Too few homes, too many people, and prices that renters say are unaffordable. 
On this special series, we're exploring how an economic boom is affecting the people who call northern B.C. home.

Kitimat: A community in upheaval

Our first stop is Kitimat: a community in upheaval.

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In part two, we get a preview of some of the voices we'll be hearing in the series.

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Landlord rights

In part three, we examine the rights of landlords- and what those rights mean for renters.

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The affordable housing crisis is getting worse, not better

An interview with Brock Carlton, CEO for the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, on the lack of affordable housing across Canada and what he thinks should be done about it.

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What life is really like for a camp worker

Around ten thousand workers are expected to be living in the Kitimat area by this summer. Mitch Wong lived at the camp for Rio Tinto Alcan's modernization project. Nearly 18 hundred people live in trailers at the site, and Wong soon discovered camp life wasn't for him.

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Fort Nelson: growth is slowing, but homes still needed

If the housing shortage of northwestern B.C. sounds familiar, it should. In 2011, northeastern B.C was facing the same issues as a result of the natural gas boom. Kim Eglinski is a councillor with the Northern Rockies Municipal District. She says that even though growth has slowed, new housing is needed for the future.

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Homeless shelters in the northwest are sending people to Prince George

In the northwest, rising rents and a lack of affordable housing are squeezing out those with low incomes. So some people are being sent to the closest affordable centre: hours away, in Prince George.

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The housing crunch is good news for developers, but bad for other businesses

Kitimat can't build new homes fast enough. This means business is booming for housing developers- but other companies are having a tough time retaining employees who can't find anywhere to live.

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Even people in trailer parks are being "renovicted"

People who live in a trailer park in Port Edward say they are worried they are being pushed out to make way for a work camp. At least 12 families are facing eviction notices- including one who just moved in.

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Single mother in Kitimat is being renovicted for a second time

"Renoviction" has become a dreaded buzzword in Kitimat. It refers to being evicted from an apartment that has been renovated, then had its rent increased. It is especially harsh on people with a low income, like this single mother.

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Housing Minister Rich Coleman

Rich Coleman is the province's minister responsible for housing. He says he's heard the concerns from the northwest, but the province has no plans to create additional affordable housing. He points to a number of programs already in place through the province, and urges renters to learn their rights.

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Finding a home in the northwest is even harder if you have a pet

Finding an affordable place to live in B.C.'s northwest is hard enough. Finding a place that allows pets is even harder. 

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Building a home for the disabled in Prince Rupert

There are not a lot of housing options, when you're disabled and living in B.C.'s northwest. But one  Prince Rupert man plans to change that.

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Is Prince Rupert ready for the housing crunch that's already hit Terrace and Kitimat?

Kitimat, Terrace, and Smithers are also facing issues of low to no vacancy. Things haven't reached that point in Prince Rupert, but some people think it's only a matter of time and are worried the city isn't prepared.

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Interviews:

When a mother bear came out of hibernation, she and her three cubs went on quite the ride

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A mother bear and her three cubs are spending the rest of their winter at a Smithers wildlife refuge. (Northern Lights Wildlife Society)


A family of bears is now hibernating in a Bulkley Valley refuge. A mother bear in Prince George came out of hibernation and, after an altercation with a dog, ran up a tree. Conservation officers had to tranquilize her, cut down the tree, and crawl into the den to retrieve her three cubs. Northern Lights Wildlife Society volunteer Tanya Landry tells the story.

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Is this Terrace lake-jumper the coldest Winter Challenge?


Terrace thrill seeker Quinn Barabash has just conquered the Winter Challenge. Barabash was challenged to jump into a frozen lake, but do so he had to drill through over thirty centimeters of ice on Terrace's Lakelse Lake. He told Andrew Kurjata about the experience.


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Coroner's inquest hopes to uncover the full truth behind fatal Burns Lake Mill explosion

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Smoke can be seen rising from the Babine Forest Products mill in Burns Lake, B.C. Saturday, Jan. 21, 2012. The explosion the day before killed two employees and injured 19 others. (Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)

B.C.'s Chief Coroner Lisa Lapointe has announced she will be personally overseeing an inquest into the fatal Burns Lake mill explosion and fire that took place in 2012. She says the inquest will be the best venue to get the full truth of what happened to cause the incident which resulted in the deaths of two men, and find ways to prevent a similar situation from happening again.

Listen to Lapointe's interview with Andrew Kurjata on CBC Daybreak North
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Lapointe says she expects the inquest to take place sometime in the fall, and to be held in Burns Lake or Prince George.

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Interviews:

Meet the man who's suing the city of Prince George for putting fluoride in the water

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Prince George is planning a referendum on tap water fluoridation during the upcoming fall municipal elections. (CBC)

The city of Prince George is facing a class action lawsuit arguing the city's flouridated water can cause a degenerative dental disease known as dental fluorosis. 

Prince George is one of only a handful of cities in the province that still adds fluoride to its drinking water in an effort to prevent tooth decay. 

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Kevin Millership, who is not a lawyer or a resident of Prince George, brought forward the lawsuit and is representing two people who claim they suffer from the disorder. 

"Every day that Prince George is fluoridated, they're causing harm," he said. "You basically look like you've been chewing on rocks and tar." 

In 2003, Kevin Millership unsuccessfully tried to sue the city of Kamloops, B.C. for putting fluoride in the water in an attempt to get compensation for himself.



Listen to Kevin Millership explain his lawsuit on CBC's Daybreak North
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The Centre of Disease Control, Health Canada, and Northern Health Authority have all endorsed adding fluoride to tap water, despite the fact that many municipalities have eliminated the chemical from its water supplies. 

When asked about these endorsements, Millership told CBC's Daybreak North "That's what the bureaucrats say," and argued other studies show fluoridation causes harm. "They know it, they're trying to sweep it under the rug."

The City of Prince George said it would not comment on the lawsuit while it is before the courts. 

A referendum on the issue will be held during the municipal election this fall.

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Topley residents fight grow-op planned for abandoned elementary school

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Ktown Medical Growers already operates one legal medical marijuana grow-op in Topley, B.C. (Ktown Medical Growers)

A northern B.C. resident wants to stop a company from turning Topley's old elementary school into a medical marijuana grow-op.   Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Vivian Eftodie for more. 

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Chasing the elusive eulachon

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Troy Scodane battles the frozen elements along the banks of the Skeena River (Photo Credit: CBC/George Baker)

Fishermen are battling Jack Frost to get at a candle fish.  Daybreak's George Baker brings us edition of From The Coast.  Here's his conversation with host Andrew Kurjata: 

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Municipalities want say in regulating work camps

The regional district of Kitimat-Stikine wants more say on how B.C. work camps operate.  It has submitted a resolution calling for the creation of an over-arching body to monitor the temporary sites.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Bruce Bidgood of the regional district, and a councilor in Terrace. 

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Why do some fans want the Prince George Cougars to be sold?

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Rumours are spreading that the WHL team the Prince George Cougars are about to be sold. Though the team's current owners are denying the sale, a number of people in the city are reacting with excitement. To explain why, former sports reporter Alistair McInnis spoke with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata.


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Prince George hockey coach gets hatemail

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The story of a Prince George peewee hockey player's good sportsmanship is spreading around the world. 

In February, The Prince George peewee hockey team Viking Construction Cougars lost a game, and coach Ryan Arnold ordered his team off the ice before shaking hands. But 12-year-old Matt Marotta went to center ice to congratulate his opponents. 

Marotta's actions have been praised but his coach has been villainized. Arnold's been suspended and admitted he made a mistake, but says he's still at the receiving end of hatemail from people he's never met. It's gotten so bad that the Marotta family has stepped in writing a letter to the Prince George Citizen newspaper asking Arnold be left alone.  

Emily Bazelon is the author of Sticks and Stones, a book that examines bullying culture. She's also studied how stories go viral and why some people take it upon themselves to punish strangers. She speaks with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata.


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The Story Exchange:

War-time sewing machine a treasure for Prince George resident

A treasured appliance and a treasured moment on this week's Story Exchange.  We'll tell you how a decades old sewing machine had an impact on a Prince George woman's life.  Daybreak's George Baker has more on the story of Mary Gouchie. 

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Improvements promised for Valemount bus service

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Greyhound 1015 by Stephen Rees/Flickr

Valemount can celebrate a small victory when it comes to Greyhound bus service. Improvements to service are being considered., such as relocating the pickup area and providing information on This comes after representatives from the Valemount Chamber of Commerce collected complaints ranging from having to stand outside in cold weather to buses not picking up waiting passengers. Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata spoke to Kiba Dempsey of the Valemount Chamber of Commerce.


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