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October 2013 Archives

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Interviews:

Northern Health inspects rail safety in northern B.C.

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The images on the front page of a new report on rail safety from Northern Health.

An increase in train traffic combined with high-profile accidents in Lac Megantic and Edmonton has prompted Northern Health to review rail safety in northern B.C. They've posted a draft report on train derailments in northern B.C. and are using it to assess the potential health impacts of the economic boom. 

Dr. David Bowering is the chief medical health officer for Northern Health. He says that as rail traffic increases, issues around emergency preparedness around the transportation of hazardous materials are going to become more important.

Listen to the full interview with Dr. David Bowering on rail safety:
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As a starting point, the report used data from the Transportation Safety Board to compile a preliminary list of all train incidents over the last decade. Last year saw 43 accidents, and so far, there have been 28 in 20-13.

Dr. Bowering says many of these incidents go unreported in the media. "Everyone who I know who has looked at it has kind of gasped and thought, 'oh my goodness. I had no idea that incidents and accidents were so commonplace."

He also says preparing for a disaster is challenging for rural communities. 

"It's a very big and almost overwhelming scenario at the moment. But I think we just have to examine what we have in front of us, and just start to work with it."

You can find the report at chip.northernhealth.ca.

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Ministry clarifies liquor licence rules as Prince George petition grows

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A screenshot of Mothus' online petition.

An online petition asking for a review of a Prince George liquor inspector has gained 700 supporters and plenty of conversation on social media sites. Dave Mothus started the petition after a number of promoters and party-goers took to social media to complain about parties they say were shut down on the weekend prior to Halloween.

However, the Ministry of Justice says the reports were incorrect, and no parties were shut down.  In an email, a spokesperson writes: "as a result of visits by the local liquor inspector, licensees were made aware that, as per the terms of their licence, liquor service should have ended earlier and they voluntarily decided to close.  In another instance, the club realized they were over capacity and took steps to correct it."

Mothus says he and others have launched complaints, but the Ministry would not confirm this.  A spokesperson notes the number of contravention notices issued since January 2013 to Prince George licensees is comparable or less than other similarly sized communities (Nanaimo, Kamloops and Kelowna)." 

Prince George-Mackenzie MLA Mike Morris says he is looking into the issue.

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Interviews:

Quesnel multi-centre referendum vote begins

People living in Quesnel and the Cariboo Regional District can now vote for the North Cariboo Multi-Centre Referendum. Advance voting dates include October 30th and November 4th.  The general voting day is November 9th.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata spoke with Heide Krause with Coalition of Concerned Citizens

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Sad story of Frank the endangered turtle in Prince Rupert

 
 
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Frank the turtle in Prince Rupert, B.C. (Photo Credit: Ecotrust/Amanda Barney)

 

An endangered sea turtle landed in Prince Rupert, B.C. after traveling from its home in Mexico.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with associate producer George Baker about the wild and slippery tale.

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John Rustad to meet with Houston constituents

It's the tale of two mill towns.  Houston, B.C.'s West Fraser sawmill is shutting down, while Burns Lake's Babine Lake sawmill is being rebuilt.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Nechako Lakes Liberal M.L.A. John Rustad.

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Interviews, The Story Exchange:

How to accidentally become the leader of an anti-Canadian movement

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Bellingham Costco needs a special time just for Americans Facebook page.

When Bryce Lokken came across a Facebook page demanding a "special time just for Americans" he came up with a plan to infiltrate it. What he didn't expect was international news crews would soon be asking for his home address. Andrew Kurjata brings us this edition of the Daybreak Story Exchange.

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Pipeline map: Have there been any incidents near you?

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Ever wonder whether your community contains any buried pipelines? Or if any issues have arisen with them over the years?

Through an access-to-information request, CBC News obtained a data set of every pipeline safety incident reported to the federal regulator in the past 12 years.

Find the full map and all the information at cbc.ca/pipelines.

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Interviews:

Prince George, Kamloops and more facing future without dermatologists

British Columbia has a shortage of dermatologists. Not only does this cost money, but it increases the risk of skin cancer and other diseases going undetected, according to Dr. Evert Tuyp of the B.C. Medical Association. He spoke with Andrew Kurjata.


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Interviews:

Sawmills set to close in B.C. Interior

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Logs at a sawmill in Quesnel, B.C. (Photo Credit: Canadian Press) 

A pair of forestry giants will close their sawmills in B.C.'s interior next year.  Canfor said it will close its sawmill in Quesnel, and West Fraser said it will shut down its operation in Houston.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with Bob Simpson, former Independent M.L.A. for Cariboo North, for reaction.

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New study looks at health impacts of wildlife collisions

A crash with wildlife could mean more than a damaged hood.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with UNBC researcher Amy von der Gonna about a new study on the health impacts of moose and deer car collisions.

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For more information and to take part in the survey, visit Health Impacts of Moose and Deer Vehicle Collisions Research Group.

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Interviews:

Water laws in B.C. are changing

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Mary Polak says proposed legislation is intended to replace the century-old Water Act (Photo Credit: CBC/Wil Fundal)

Mary Polak is visiting the north to talk about B.C.'s fresh water legislation.  The environment minister spoke with Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener in our Prince George studios for more. 

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Interviews:

Fogtober, here to stay?

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Outside CBC studios in Prince George, B.C.

Thick fog has forced some flights to be cancelled or delayed at the Prince George and Terrace airports.  So it got us thinking, how unusual is it for this dense fog to be here?  Daybreak spoke to Environment Canada meteorologist Doug Lundquist for more.

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Interviews:

Smoking-related deaths higher for people with mental disorder

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Russell Callaghan in the Dr. Donald R. Rix Northern Health Sciences Centre (Photo Credit: UNBC)

A new study from the University of Northern B.C. has made a link between mental disorders and tobacco-related illness.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Russell Callaghan, Associate Professor at the Northern Medical Program.

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For more, visit UNBC-led study: Individuals with Psychiatric Disorders More Likely to Die from Tobacco-Related Diseases

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Interviews:

Telkwa councillor reacts to Gainford derailment

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Controlled burn of product in derailed tank cars near Gainford, Alberta (Photo Credit: Flickr/Transportation Safety Board)

More than a hundred people were forced from their homes after 13 CN Rail cars carrying oil and gas derailed.  It caught fire in Alberta over the weekend.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with Rimas Zikauskas, a village councillor in Telkwa.

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Interviews, The Story Exchange:

Unique tale of love and music

Our latest edition of the Daybreak Story Exchange features an ode to a heart.  After a surprise health twist, one man is prompted to write a song for his wife.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata introduces a piece produced by George Baker about music for the soul, and an open heart.

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contests:

Great Big Photo Contest

Submissions are now closed. East Coast favourites Great Big Sea are coming to the region, with a show in Prince George on October 24. We have tickets to give away, but to get them you have to send us a picture of a Great Big Thing. Browse the gallery below for inspiration.

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Interviews:

Totem pole honours 30 residential school survivors

Carved in history.  A totem pole is being raised to honour residential school survivors.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with carver Ron Austin for more.

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Interviews:

Gamers get ready! PG is hosting a convention

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Northern Players Connection presents 3rd Annual Gaming Convention in Prince George, B.C.

Forget comic and video game conventions.  Prince George is hosting its very own gaming convention this weekend.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Nick Pelletier, one of the organizers, for more.

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Interviews:

Century crossings on the Skeena

The Usk Ferry celebrates 100 years on the Skeena River.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with the man who once captained the last ferry on the Skeena.  Here's her conversation with Dan Hamilton.

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Interviews:

Poor design can lead to crime

Are too many trees leading to drug drops in downtown Prince George?  Community Policing is teaching what it calls "Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design."  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with coordinator Linda Parker.

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The city of Prince George wants to know if you would split your property in half

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A picture of what a narrow-lot property would look like.

Some property owners in Prince George have received letters asking if they would be interested in subdividing their property to accommodate "narrow-lot" housing. In a section of the letter titled "Why does the City of Prince George support narrow lot housing?" the city says it is interested in renewing neighbourhoods and encouraging pedestrian-oriented housing.

Jesse Dill is in the city's planning department. He says the idea is modeled on communities such as Calgary that has increased narrow-lot housing in recent years. "The idea is to promote density at the right locations from a planning perspective, where there's existing services, existing amenities." He also points out that the properties that have received the letters were originally designed to have smaller homes, but people often built across two or more lots instead of just one.

Letters have gone out to homes in the Millar Addition, the VLA, and the Heritage and Spruceland neighbourhoods. The final open house on the subject is tonight at Rob Brent Elementary School at 5:30 pm.

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Interviews:

Northern BC look ahead on Throne Speech

Parliament resumes with the Speech from the Throne.  And University of Northern BC professor Tracey Summerville speaks with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata for some perspective.

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Interviews:

Housing shortage in Smithers

BC Housing is visiting Smithers to talk about the housing shortage in the village.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Joan LeClair, chair of the Smithers Action Group Association, for more.

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Interviews:

JOINT REVIEW PANEL: City hall technology & politics in the classroom

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Emily Yao & Will Cadell in our Prince George, B.C. studio (Photo Credit: CBC/Andrew Kurjata)

Do politics belong in the classroom?  Plus is new technology the answer to getting more people involved at city hall?  Our latest edition of the Joint Review Panel features Will Cadell, and Emily Yao.  They speak with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata.

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Interviews, The Story Exchange:

A strange tale in the land of the kiwi

She went for the experience, but she came home with a tale of a lifetime.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata introduces our latest Story Exchange submission, produced by Robert Doane.

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Interviews:

Fassbender defends decision not to pay for wage increases

There's more money for school support workers, but no for the school districts they work for.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with B.C. Education Minister Peter Fassbender for more.

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Interviews:

Lighthouse keeper recounts Haida Gwaii earthquake

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Bonilla Island, south west of Prince Rupert, B.C. Oct 2012 (Photo Credit: Gordon Harris)

A former lighthouse operator on Bonilla Island, in northwest B.C., gives a first hand account of the earthquake on Haida Gwaii.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Gordon Harris who now lives in Fort St. John, B.C.

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Interviews:

Former MLA Pat Bell opening Prince George's first winery

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Pat Bell says Northern Lights Estate Winery will open on the banks of the Nechako River in 2015.
For over a decade Pat Bell was a cabinet minister in the B.C. Liberal government. But now he's doing something new: he's opening Prince George's first winery. He speaks with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata.

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Northern Lights Estate Winery is expected to open on the banks of the Nechako River in 2015. Bell says a seasonal restaurant will follow in 2016.

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Interviews:

Yertle the Turtle allowed back in Prince Rupert classrooms


In April 2012, the story of a Dr. Seuss quote that was apparently banned in a Prince Rupert classroom went viral, making headlines in the Globe and Mail, the Gawker blog network, and even the Atlantic.The school district told CBC that it's not Yertle the Turtle that was banned, but political action in the classroom. They argued that quotes from the Dr. Seuss story on t-shirts and buttons in the context of an ongoing dispute were political in nature.

Today, the B.C. Teacher's Federation is calling an arbitration settlement a victory for freedom of speech. Teachers who were disciplined have received apologies, and disciplinary letters have been removed from their files. Joanna Larsen of the BCTF says she expects this case to set a new precedent for freedom of expression.

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Interviews:

Canadian spy agencies hold secret meetings with energy companies

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The agenda for a secret meeting between Canadian intelligence and security agencies and energy companies. These meetings happen on a regular basis.

Documents obtained under the Access to Information Act have revealed that federal agencies including the RCMP, CSIS, and CSEC regularly meet with energy stakeholders to discuss "national security, criminal intelligence, threat risk assessment and to share energy-related classified intelligence."

Topics outlined in an agenda obtained by the CBC include "Aboriginal Protests and Occupations", "Vulnerabilitiy of Buried Pipelines to Explosive Attack", and "Domestic Terrorism."

When asked to comment on the meetings, former federal public safety minister Stockwell Day said the meetings are appropriate because there "activists who wouldn't have a conscience about using literally explosive means to make a political point."

Keith Stewart of Greenpeace disagrees saying the government has started protecting the issues of the oil and mining industries instead.

For his reaction, Daybreak host Andrew Kurjata spoke to Michel Juneau-Katsuya, a former senior intelligence officer with CSIS. He says these meetings are happening, and in his opinion should happen more often- although he would like to see less secrecy. 

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Interviews:

Husband and wife split up in order to keep dogs in Prince Rupert

A Prince Rupert, B.C. couple is doing everything for the love of their dogs.  They've even decided to live apart.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Katherine Spong about why.

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Interviews:

Tremor causes new type of earthquake in Haida Gwaii

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Earthquakes dries up hot springs at Haida Gwaii (Photo Credit: Flickr/Anne Lazerevitch)

The earthquake that shook Haida Gwaii, and created a Tsunami, wasn't typical.  In fact, it was the first of kits kind for the region.  John Cassidy is a research scientist with Natural Resources Canada.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks to him for more.

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Interviews:

First of its kind LNG summit in Prince George

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Carrier Sekani Tribal Council Chief Terry Teegee (Photo Credit: lineinthesand.ca)

A meeting of industry leaders, municipal, provincial, and federal politicians begins today in Prince George, B.C.  The Carrier Sekani Tribal Council is hosting the summit to talk about liquified natural gas.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with Chief Terry Teegee.

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Interviews:

Panelists take on speed and the downtown

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Sarah Holland & Gary Godwin in our studio (Photo Credit: CBC/Andrew Kurjata)

Is Prince George's downtown fixed?  And should we eliminate highway speed limits all together?  Our Joint Review Panelists answer those and other questions.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with Sarah Holland and Gary Godwin.

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Interviews:

Inquest into shooting death of Greg Matters begins

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Canadian Forces veteran Greg Matters was getting treatment for his PTSD at the time of his death. (Photo courtesy of Matters family)

The family of a Canadian army veteran hopes an inquest that begins in Prince George, B.C. will end with overhauls to RCMP policies about the handling of anyone with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with reporter Marissa Harvey who has been covering the case. 

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For more, visit Coroner's inquest for RCMP shooting of Greg Matters begins.

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Interviews, The Story Exchange:

The dream engagement

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Carly Hlina Bonnett, Arla Gardner, and Stephen Bonnett at Wedding Reception (Photo Credit: Facebook)

Carly Bonnett, formerly Hlina, had a dream engagement.  And this edition of The Story Exchange might make some fellas look bad.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener introduces the piece produced by Adrian Mrdeza.

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Prince George first mosque is finally complete

 

 

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A minaret now sits on top of the Prince George Islamic Centre. We speak with architect Sharif Senbel about the history of the minaret and what it was like creating Northern B-C's first ever mosque.

 

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Interviews:

Residential school runners and the '67 Pan-Am Games.

 

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In 1967, a group of First Nations men ran for five days towards Winnipeg.They carried a torch, that would soon light the cauldron, for the Pan Am Games.But controversy soon ensued. Betsy Trumpener speaks with one of the runners, Charlie Nelson. 

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Interviews:

Search and rescue leader says current funding model is broken

When someone goes missing in B.C., much of the work of finding them goes to volunteers at local search and rescue organizations. But with fewer donations coming in, leaders say major changes need to be made in order to sustain their efforts. Jeff Smedley is president of Search and Rescue Prince George. 

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Interviews:

Gas leak leads to evacuation and perimeter in downtown Prince George

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A fire truck watches for sparks as crews work to shut off a gas leak in downtown Prince George.

Construction crews hit a gas line in downtown Prince George Thursday morning, causing a leak and emergency response. RCMP have set up a perimeter in a one-block radius around 9th Avenue and Brunswick Street, evacuating the EconoLodge motel and advising people in other nearby buildings to stay indoors with windows and doors shut. RCMP spokesperson Craig Douglass speaks with Betsy Trumpener.

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Enbridge:

Enbridge's Northern Gateway advertising poem sparks debate

An advertising campaign that includes a poem about the Pacific ocean is creating debate, including award winning Haida Gwaii poet Susan Musgrave. Here are the voices of Musgrave, Enbridge spokesperson Ivan Giesbrecht and people in Prince George.

 

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Interviews:

Expert says city referendums not always the best solution

Civic referendums are big talk in two communities this month. Quesnel is set to hold one over a new multiplex; Prince Rupert won't hold one for a loan to its airport. Ryerson University urban planning professor Mitchell Kosny joins us to answer why.

 

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Prince George man upset after bear warning issued for apple tree

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Garnet Fraser believes this electric fence should serve as a deterrent to any bears interested in his apple tree.


A Prince George man is upset after a conservation officer told him to pick his apples or risk a fine. Although fines can be issued for attracting bears with fruit trees, Fraser believes this warning does not apply because the apples were not ripe, and they were protected by an electric fence. Now he's concerned that there is a war on fruit trees in Prince George. He speaks with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata.

 

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Daybreak's Joint Review Panel discusses pot, pipeline poems and Breaking bad

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This is Daybreak's Joint Review Panel of the airwaves -- Our panels of local people assess the impact of the big stories of the day. Mark Wessner is lead pastor at Prince George's Westwood Church And Emily Yao a downtown lawyer busy with drug cases.

 

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Interviews:

Cheslatta first nation wants to re-route resevoire to save burial grounds

The Cheslatta Carrier Nation has dealt with flooding for sixty two years. It all started with the construction of the Kenney Dam that services Rio Tinto Alcan's smelter in Kitimat. Now the nation is taking matters into its own hands.

 

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Interviews:

B.C. First Nation applies for lucrative water licence

Tune in to Daybreak in northern B.C. on CBC Radio One just after 7 am for interview with Mike Robertson of the Cheslatta Carrier Nation.

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The Nechako river, in the heart of the nation's traditional territory, was severely affected when the Kenney dam was built to power Rio Tinto's smelter in Kitimat. (CBC)



Sixty-two years after a dam flooded its traditional territory and dried up parts of north-central British Columbia's Nechako River, the Cheslatta Carrier Nation is moving to profit from the structure built to power the Rio Tinto smelter in Kitimat.

Cheslatta spokesman Mike Robertson says the nation has filed for a water licence application with the B.C. government for its proposed $280 million Nechako River Legacy Project.

The band is hoping to create a profit for the Cheslatta to bring the river back to life.

Robertson says they've considered the project for decades, but today's formal application marks a major milestone in an attempt to take advantage of the project that at one time flooded traditional grave sites and decimated a fresh-water fishery.

In 1952, the Kenney Dam was constructed to create energy to power the aluminum smelter in Kitimat.

The Cheslatta were not consulted about the project that reversed the flow of the Nechako River through a 16-kilometre tunnel to Kemano, the site of the smelter power plant near Kitimat.

"Submitting this application formally starts the process of getting back the water that was taken from us 62 years ago when the government issued a private company licence to all of the water in Cheslatta traditional territory" Chief Richard Peters said in a statement.

Rio Tinto Alcan controls water flows

The project envisions creating a small outlet of water from the dam that would power hydroelectric turbines, which would be connected to the BC Hydro grid. The band would earn revenue by selling the power to Hydro and once through the turbines, the water would then flow into the portions of the Neckako River that have been dry for so long.

Robertson says the band is proposing to work with BC Hydro, the B.C. government and Rio Tinto Alcan.

On Monday, Rio Tinto Alcan released a statement saying the company has participated in talks regarding the possibility of enhancing the downstream environment of the Nechako River by constructing a water release facility at the Kenney Dam.

But company spokeswoman Colleen Nyce said in a statement that the water the Cheslatta propose to use for their legacy project is water connected to a spillway linked to the dam's reservoir system at Skins Lake and there are legal agreements in place between the company and the federal and provincial governments. She would not elaborate on whether this would pose an obstacle to the Cheslatta.

She said Rio Tinto Alcan remains committed to working with the Cheslatta as they conduct technical work related to their project.