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August 2013 Archives

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Interviews:

Is it too difficult to be a paramedic in British Columbia?

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This week on Daybreak we've been following the story of a shortage of ambulance care in remote and rural communities. Cameron Eby is on the provincial executive for the Ambulance Paramedics of B.C. union. He says part of the problem is that in order to become a paramedic, you must take nine months of school at a cost of thousands of dollars. This school is usually in larger cities, so people from remote locations must give up other work in order to complete the training. Then when they return to their communities, they don't get full pay unless they are responding to an emergency. He spoke with Betsy Trumpener.

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We have been following this story all week. On Tuesday, we heard about a proposal from the community of Stewart to change how ambulance care in funded and delivered in B.C. They say wait times are "unacceptable" and have support from Prince George city councillor Dave Wilbur who says communities like Stewart are treated like "second-class citizens." We asked Mike Milchako, B.C. Ambulance's Executive Director for Rural Operations for his thoughts. You can listen to that interview below.

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We also spoke with Cindy Ellwood who used to be Stewart's ambulance unit chief, but quit due to stress and a lack of support. She has been offered her job back, but says much would have to change in order for that to happen.

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We have continuously requested an interview with B.C.'s health minister Terry Lake on this issue. That request has not been accepted.

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Interviews:

Alleged Prince George gangster gunned down in Coquitlam

 

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Joey Lamont Arrance lived a life of crime in Prince George with alleged links to the Game Tight Soldiers, the Renegades and Hell's Angels.

It all came crashing down on him on Tuesday night, targeted and hunted down while sitting in his SUV.

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Interviews:

Strange sound spooks Terrace residents

Was it electromagnetic energy? A Biblical prophecy? Or simply construction crews? People all over Terrace reported hearing a strange noise that lasted over ten minutes on  Thursday morning. Resident Mandi Campbell shares her experience with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata.


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The below video was posted on YouTube by Kimberly Wookey. It has prompted speculation from around the world, with people attributing the noise to everything from UFOs to the railyard.


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Interviews:

Stewart paramedic who left the service speaks out

 

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Cindy Ellwood worked her way up to become Stewart's paramedic unit chief. It was a big accomplishment after 11 years on the job. She tells Betsy Trumpener why she left it all behind.

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No privacy policy in place for Prince George downtown parking plan

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A slide from Aparc's presentation to Prince George city council. Aparc says there would be no link between photographs of licence plates and personal information.

City staff in Prince George have recommended bringing back pay parking to downtown. If that happens, the company behind the return would be Aparc Systems. At a special city council meeting on Wednesday evening, Aparc described their system as the most sophisticated available. But in an interview on Daybreak, tech analyst Jesse Hirsh warned that the licence plate-scanning and storing technology companies like Aparc use could be a slippery slope. He told us

"The collection of any data always has unforeseen consequences, and in the case of licence plate scanning, it's an issue of location tracking. You think about it, everywhere you park is a little bit of information that when collated into a computer, into a database can say be quite revealing in terms of saying a lot about what you do."

That issue was raised by councillor Lynn Hall at Wednesday's meeting when he asked Aparc vice-president Luke Kiefte how long licence plate information would be stored. Kiefte responded "The information is retained for as long as the city rules dictate. It can be retained for as short a time as needed or for as long a time as needed." He added that the data is "very" secure and it available only to the city.

Hall followed-up by asking city manager Beth James what the city's policies are. She informed him that the privacy policy for the program has not been developed since the program has yet to be approved. However, she said that the province already has strong privacy policies in place, as well as other city privacy policies. "So we would leverage off of those and design a program that is consistent with the rights of British Columbians.

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Interviews:

Duck-billed dinosaur discovery airlifted to Tumbler Ridge




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This rendering is of a 'Red Willow hadrosaur' head from northern Alberta, a separate species from the hadrosaurs, or duck-billed dinosaurs, that roamed southern Alberta. (Robin Sissons, Grande Prairie Regional College )


Listen to Andrew Kurjata interview paleontologist Lisa Buckley about her dino discovery on Daybreak North.

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It took several years to coordinate, but B.C.'s most complete dinosaur skeleton has a new home in Tumbler Ridge.

The plaster-wrapped fossilized bones of a hadrosaur, or duck-billed dinosaur, were recently airlifted from a dig site near the B.C.-Alberta border to the Peace Region Palaeontology Research Centre.

Lisa Buckley, curator and collections manager with the centre, said she and her team discovered the fossilized skeleton in 2009 -- the first hadrosaur find in B.C.

"Dinosaur finds in terms of skeletons in British Columbia are not that common. They're bordering on rare, to be honest."

Hadrosaurs, a family of distinctive-looking plant-eating dinosaurs, lived more than 65 million years ago.

"And they're the ones that had the really funky head gear, like the big long tubes extending back over the head, or the big frill running down the centre of the head," Buckley said.

But sadly, this duck-billed skeleton is missing that impressive feature.

"It does not have its head, no. And it's following a disturbingly frustrating trend with other duck-billed dinosaur skeletons. It's very common for their heads to be missing."

Nevertheless, the headless dinosaur is B.C.'s most complete dinosaur skeleton, and a major find.

It will be displayed at the museum in Tumbler Ridge.

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A Vancouver Island Helicopters pilot lifts 1,996 kilograms of plaster-wrapped dinosaur bones out of and excavation site near the B.C.-Alberta border. The hadrosaur skeleton, minus its missing its head, will be on display in Tumbler Ridge. (Photo courtesy Richard T. McCrea)

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Interviews:

Barkerville beer coming soon

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The logo for the Barkerville Brewing Company. The startup hopes to be supplying drinks by the end of 2013.

Russell Ovans is a successful tech entrepreneur from Vancouver Island who has decided to open a microbrewery in Quesnel. Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata finds out why.

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Beers on tap will include 18 Karat Ale, the Wandering Camel and Prospector's Peril.

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The Playlist:

Playlist: Heartbreaking summer tracks

Love: it flurished in May and seems to be dying away in August. That's our theme this week on the Daybreak Playlist.

 

MONDAY AUGUST 26, 2013:

JACKSOUL -- "Hurts to Love You"

 

TUESDAY AUGUST 27, 2013:

 

PETER ELKES -- "Party of One"

 

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 28, 2013

BLUE RODEO -- "Hasn't Hit Me Yet

 

 

FRIDAY AUGUST 30, 2013

Julie London -- Cry Me a River

 

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Interviews:

What would high tech parking enforcement mean for your privacy in downtown Prince George?

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Parking in downtown Prince George is currently free for two hours, but that could change soon.


Prince George city council is considering bringing back pay parking downtown, but it won't be the meters of old. Instead, they are examining high tech options that include cameras and licence plate reading technology. For more on how this technology works, we spoke with CBC's tech columnist Jesse Hirsh.

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Interviews:

B.C. RCMP shooting victim's family call for charges

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23-year-old Justin Zinser was shot by RCMP after a hiking trip with friends. His family is calling for charges to be laid.


Listen to Justin Zinser's stepfather Allen Busch, speaking with CBC:

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Stepfather still pursuing a charge of manslaughter for the officer who shot Zinser

The family of a Williams Lake man shot dead by RCMP nearly two years ago wants charges laid against the officers involved.

Justin Zinser, 23, was shot in a cabin at Nimpo Lake in Sept. 2011, after stopping there on a hiking trip with a friend.

The lake lies in a remote area approximately 240 kilometres southwest of Prince George, or 400 kilometres northwest of Vancouver.

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Delta Police investigated the shooting, but concluded no charges should be laid. Earlier this month, a Coroner's inquest also examined Zinser's death.

Zinser's stepfather Allen Bush feels like he's losing his step-son all over again.

"It was pretty tough to hear what happened. And then sitting in disbelief, trying to figure out, well, why are they not helping Justin? They shot him," said Bush.

The inquest jury heard it was bad weather that forced Zinser and his friend to spend the night at the cabin.

At some point, the RCMP were called in.

Zinser was carrying a gun, and police yellled at him to put it down. Still holding onto the gun, Zinser turned away, and an officer shot him in the back.

He bled to death shortly after being transported to a nursing station.

Allen Bush is still pursuing a charge of manslaughter for the officer who shot Zinser.

"And for the four members, I'm not sure what the charge would be. There was no attempt to help save Justin's life after they shot him. That's wrong."

The inquest jury made several recommendations to improve emergency care in remote areas.

CBC Daybreak North reporter Marissa Harvey on the Justin Zinser Inquest:

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Cariboo Regional District looks to zone medical pot

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Medical Marijuana grow ops could soon share space with sawmills in the caribou region. District directors there want to zone grow operations as industrial. Daybreak speaks with Cariboo Regional District chair Al Richmond.

 

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Interviews:

Prince Rupert's battle with the longboard

 

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The longboard is the transportation of choice for some teens living in Prince Rupert. They weave through traffic, angering drivers and worrying city councillors. And now police are investigating. Andrew Kurjata speaks with RCMP officer Maury Tyre

 

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Interviews:

Northern B.C. community says ambulance service is "unacceptable"

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The District of Stewart is calling on fellow B.C. municipalities to support its bid to change the way ambulance service in the province is delivered. In a letter to mayors and councils across British Columbia, Interim Chief Administrative Officer for Stewart Jim Kincaid calls the level of ambulance service in the northwestern community "unacceptable", adding "It is not out of the ordinary to see us with no ambulance for periods of three to five days in a row." 

Stewart is submitting a resolution to the Union of B.C. Municipalities that asks the province to change the funding and operating model for ambulance services. Prince George city councillor Dave Wilbur has indicated he supports the resolution, saying Stewart and other rural communities are being treated as "second class citizens" when it comes to ambulance care.

For response, Betsy Trumpener spoke to Mike Milchako, B.C. Ambulance's Executive Director for Rural Operations. Listen to the interview below.

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Letter from the District of Stewart


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Interviews:

Bella Bella struck again by vandalism

 

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It's another blow to a community, that had already lost a lot this summer. Bella Bella Community School was severely damaged, thanks to a vandal last week. Betsy Trumpener speaks with school board director Kamal Fichtali.

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Interviews:

Where has the missing Cuban baseball player gone?

 

 

 

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A Cuban baseball player is on the run, looking to defect and chase his major league dreams. Betsy Trumpener speaks with Josh Labove. He's an S-F-U PhD student studying border security and immigration.

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Interviews:

Raising kids isn't cheap in Northern BC

 

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The Fraser Institute says raising a kid these days is fairly cheap -- about $4,000 per year. But real parents in Northern B.C. tend to disagree. Betsy Trumpener speaks with Prince George father Stu Brown and Haida Gwaii mother Hilary Thorpe.

 

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World Baseball Challenge wraps up for 2013

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Despite possibly losing a player to defection, Cuba's Ciego de Avila Tigres won the World Baseball Challenge on Thursday. Co-chair Jim Swanson talks about the ups and downs of hosting this year's events with Andrew Kurjata.

 

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Enbridge:

Risk-free politics: why oil pipelines could be heading east rather than west

 

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University of British Columbia public policy professor George Hoberg says oil pipeline companies are better off heading for the smoother-sailing east rather than rougher west. It's just politically safer. He speaks with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata.

 

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Interviews:

World Baseball Challenge stars answer the A-Rod question

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Alex Rodriguez's alleged performance enhancing drug use -- and ensuing legal battle -- is placing baseball players are under tighter scrutiny. Daybreak's Shaam Semere asks players at the World Baseball Challenge whether they accept PED use in pro sports

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Interviews:

As Sea Levels rise, who on B.C.'s north coast should be prepared?

 

 

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Flooded homes, drowned marinas and stronger storms. Climate change is set to usher in an ocean of new costs for B-C's coastal communities. SFU geologist John Clague helps answer which communities should be planning for the worst.

 

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Interviews:

Prince George Naturalists want to turn urban wetland into major attraction (photos)

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Clive Keen of the Prince George Naturalists Club considers how to incorporate a downtown neighbourhood into an improved Hudson's Bay Slough trail the club is working on.

The Hudson's Bay Slough is located between a trailer park, an industrial street, and the area of town known as Prince George's hood. That could be the reason it is underused. But the Prince George Naturalists Club wants to change that, and are in the process of creating an urban walk that they hope will bring more nature to the city.
 

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Competition between west coast ports is heading to Washington

 

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Two U-S senators want are introducing a tax, they hope will level the playing field with the port of Prince Rupert. Washington State senators, Maria Cantwell and Patty Murray, are introducing the Harbour Maintenace Tax. We speak with Association of Canadian Port Authorities executive director Wendy Zatylny about how this might impact the North Coast.

 

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Hard split on plaza renovation

Prince George City Council is moving towards sprucing up the Civic Centre Plaza. It's expected to cost around half a million dollars, and will play a big role in the 2015 Winter Games. But at least one city councillor is against the idea.

 

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Farmers rally for child gardeners

 

 

 

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Farmers are coming to the rescue of some pre-schoolers with green thumbs. Child gardeners in Prince George had their summer harvest ripped off. Just when they thought all was lost, farmer Roman Muntener and friends came to the rescue.

 

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Hundreds of vegetables planted by youth stolen

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Carrots, peppers, and zucchinis stolen from Urban Garden (Photo Credit: theexplorationplace.com)

"It really looks like this was a theft motivated by hunger," says Amanda Tisseur.  "All of the vegetables that were taken were very carefully harvested off of the plants," says the deputy director at Exploration Place Museum in Prince George, B.C.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Tisseur for more.

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For more, visit Explorers Urban Garden.

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Interviews:

Holocaust survivor helps residential school survivors

Two wounds healing as one.  A holocaust survivor living in B.C. is trying to help residential school survivors.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Robbie Waisman.

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Interviews:

Prince George civic plaza to get facelift

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Concept for the redesign of the civic center (Photo Credit: Prince George Council Agenda)

Prince George City Council will decide how to re-design the Prince George civic centre.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata spoke with people who use the area about how they think the area should be changed.

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Interviews:

Ball & bat boys: the story of the unnoticed

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Ryan Hampe & Quinten Astorino, members of the Prince George AAA Peewee Knights (Photo Credit: CBC/Adrian Mrdeza)

We head inside the dugout to meet, arguably, one of the quickest people on the ballfield.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata introduces a piece produced by Associate Producer Adrian Mrdeza.

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Chemical spill closes Prince George highway

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RCMP block off Old Cariboo Higway between Giscome Road and Johnson Road due to chemical spill (Marissa Harvey)


Police and firefighters in Prince George have blocked off the Old Cariboo Highway after a crash and a chemical spill.

At lease one RCMP officer is in hospital being treated for exposure.

Officials are asking anyone who may have driven through the spill to head to the hospital immediately.

It isn't clear yet what the chemical is but police say it is a corrosive material in liquid form.

Our reporter Marissa Harvey is on the scene. Updates throughout the day on CBC Radio and cbc.ca/bc.



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Interviews:

Caving club searching for Canada's deepest cave in northwestern B.C.

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A team from the Northern B.C. Caving Club scoped out the area near Atlin last year. (Martin Davis/YouTube)

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A group of cavers from Prince George is on a quest to B.C.'s far northwest to identify what could be Canada's deepest cave.

Bob Rutherford, president of the Northern B.C. Caving Club, will begin exploring a large limestone formation near Atlin, on the Taku River, along with eight others from the club.

The group scoped out the area last year and based on the elevation, Rutherford estimates the cave could be up to 1,000 metres deep.

He is packing about 600 meters of rope, but if he finds what he's looking for, he doesn't think it will be enough.

"I don't think we have enough time, and possibly not enough rope to get to the bottom of it."

In addition to reams of rope, the expedition requires lots of cash.

"We're looking at between $1,500 to $2,000 per person to get in there."

The cavers will likely have to brave cold, dark, damp and dangerous conditions.

"A little bit of fear's a healthy thing, I think," Rutherford said.


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Interviews:

Curbside recycling coming to Prince George, Dawson Creek


The provincial government has tasked the not-for-profit organization Multi-Material B.C. with bringing recycling options to citizens throughout the province.  That task includes bringing a curbside recycling program to the city of Prince George by May 2014.  Managing director Allen Langdon speaks with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata for more.

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Extra:

LIVESTREAM: Gwaii Haanas pole raising

Haida Gwaii will raise a totem pole for the first time in more than a century.  On Thursday, at 2:00pm Pacific time, the 42-foot Legacy Pole will be raised.  And if you're near a computer, you can see it live:  Gwaii Haanas Legacy Pole Raising.

For more information on this, visit Gwaii Haanas or Parks Canada.

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Interviews:

Hunger & death common in northern B.C.'s residential schools: expert

New revelations of medical research in residential schools doesn't surprise one professor.  And we continue the discussion with Mary-Ellen Kelm.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with the Canada Research Chair in History, Medicine, and Society at Simon Fraser University. 

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Extra, Interviews:

Haida Gwaii hot spring return unlikely says expert

Too much time has passed since hot water disappeared from Haida Gwaii's national park, making it unlikely the hot springs will return, a geologist says.

"It's like somebody coming out of a coma. With each passing day, the chances of them coming out of it lessens," said Glenn Woodsworth, who is preparing to release the third edition of his book Hotsprings of Western Canada.

Woodsworth speaks with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata:

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For more, visit Haida Gwaii hot springs unlikely to return, geologist says.

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Extra:

Storeowner campaigns against Globe & Mail paper suspension

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Darlene Dawydiuk of Spruceland News in Prince George, B.C. campaigns to stop the suspension of newsprint version of Globe & Mail (Photo Credit: Facebook)

A Prince George, B.C. news stand owner is vowing to keep the printed version of the Globe and Mail in her city.  

"Over the time, we have sort of witnessed many, many newspapers from our newstand disappear," says Darlene Dawydiuk.

She says she won't let it happen:  "National Post was one... and the customers had a public outcry."

"There's a lot of loyal [Globe & Mail] customers that come to our store,"  says Dawydiuk.

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On Tuesday, the Globe and Mail said it would suspend deliveries of its paper edition as of October 1st.

Other cities include Prince Rupert, Revelstoke, Whistler, Sun Peaks, and communities in Newfoundland and Labrador.

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Extra:

Globe & Mail deliveries in northern B.C. suspended in Oct

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The Globe and Mail will only be available online in northern B.C. starting October 1st (Photo Credit: PressDisplay Blog)

If you like to pore over your morning newspaper while drinking coffee, you won't have that option anymore, at least when it comes to the Globe and Mail. 

As of October 1st, the paper will stop supplying its newsprint version to places like Prince George, Prince Rupert, Whistler, Sun Peaks, Revelstoke, and in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Books and Company, a bookstore in downtown Prince George, receives the Globe by truck and sells it at its storefront.  Other local businesses, like hotels and shops, also receive the paper the same way.

The Globe says it spends more than a million and a half dollars for just 3,000 subscribers and calls the service inefficient.

It says it will offer its customers discounts for online access to the site instead.

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Interviews:

Ancient marine reptile named after B.C. doctor

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The Gulosaurus Helmi is a type of Eoichthyosauria rendered here (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

How cool would it be to be for your namesake to be immortalized?  That's exactly what's happening to Dr. Charles Helm.  He spoke with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata about his connection to a 250 million year old marine reptile.

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Interviews:

Paralyzed crows not west nile virus

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Necropsy on 8 young birds rules out West Nile Virus (Photo Credit: David Iliff, License CC-BY-SA 3.0)

Necropsies on eight young birds from B.C.'s northeast have ruled out viruses like West Nile.  But the mystery deepens because the birds were found to have broken wings and legs.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with Helen Schwantje.

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For more, visit Mystery of paralyzed birds deepens.


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Interviews:

First Nations sockeye fisheries shut down for first time

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Officials estimate only 453,000 sockeye will swim along Skeena River this year. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)

First Nations fisheries on the Skeena are closed for the first time ever.  And that's because the return numbers are so low, no one is allowed to fish until late August.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Mel Kotyk, North Coast director with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

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For more, visit Alaskan fisheries allegedly endangering Skeena sockeye.

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The Playlist:

Playlist: Songs fit for a king

As you may have heard, there's a new Prince George on the block. And so from the home of one Prince George to another, we here in northern B.C. are making a playlist of songs fit for a future king, starting with Royal Wood and "I Want Your Love."

For track two, we picked our very own northern royalty: King Crow and the Ladies from Hell with "In You Shadow."

   

 Track three came to us from self-described anti-monarchist Paul Wodchyc who recommended "Blue Suede Shoes" by the king of rock and roll.

   

 Track four is from listener Rob Hesse: the young New Zealand singer Lorde and "Royals."
 

And for track five, Blaine Bowe suggests a song from true Canadian music royalty: Neil Young and "Old King."

   

Mark Hanen of Dawson Creek writes,

"Prince George is no trailer park boy, but here is a kingly song suggestion for the royal young 'un. 'King of the Road' written and performed by Roger Miller.'

From the city of Prince George (to the royal Prince George), the band Concerns of Royalty with "Life Goes By."

The rich voice of Dan Mangan with "The Indie Queens Are Waiting."

And finally, something every prince needs when visiting Canada: Royal Canoe, and the song "Caught In A Loop."

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Extra:

Photos: Rabbits, horses and more at Prince George's BC Northern Exhibition

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Sterling Nielly, 11, and his show rabbit 'Freight Train' prepare for 4-H competition. (Photo Credit: CBC/Betsy Trumpener)

The roller coasters are rolling.  The cotton candies are getting spun.  And the north's nicest animals are strutting their stuff at the 101st B.C. Northern Exhibition.  The fair gates open at 10 o'clock with the midway starting at 11 o'clock.  For more information, visit B.C. Northern Exhibition.

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Gates open for the 101st BCNE fair in Prince George, B.C. (Photo Credit: CBC/Betsy Trumpener)

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Emily and her blue-eyed horse, Skye, ready to compete at B.C.N.E. Equitation (Photo Credit: CBC/Betsy Trumpener)

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Interviews:

Houston mayor to visit Unist'ot'en blockade

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Unist'ot'en blockade near Houston (Photo Credit: unistotencamp.com)

Houston mayor Bill Holberg worries the Unist'ot'en blockade will soon stop resource companies from entering their territory.  The camp has been stopping pipeline workers.  Holberg spoke with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata.

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Interviews:

Fire destroys building in Smithers

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Firefighters hose down hot spots in downtown Smithers, B.C. (Photo Credit: Brian Burrill)

A fire in downtown Smithers, B.C. has destroyed two buildings on the town's mainstreet.  The fire department was able to stop the fire from spreading.

"This is some tragic news to wakeup to this morning," says mayor Taylor Bachrach.  "We have about 50 firefighters on the scene."

Organizers of the community's centennial celebrations is now looking to make changes to its celebration plans.

"We'll do the very best we can to help people," says organizer Gladys Atrill.

Officials say no one was injured, and power is expected to be restored to the 100 or so BC Hydro customers later this morning.

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Interviews:

Should Vancouver Island be its own province?

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The original flag of the colony of Vancouver Island (Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

The VI Province Initiative wants Vancouver Island to separate from the rest of B.C. and become its own province.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata spoke with organizer Laurie Goulay.

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Interviews:

[BC Hydro] made mistakes: BC energy and mines minister

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The Northwest Transmission Line's schematic map. (Photo Credit: BC Hydro)

BC's Energy and Mines minister is unhappy about the increased costs of the Northwest Transmission Line.  Bill Bennett is in Terrace to tour the route of the line.  The cost for the project has nearly doubled since its 2007 estimate of $404-million dollars.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener spoke with the minister.

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For more, visit Northwest Transmission Line costs jump $150M

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Interviews:

Hundreds of people coming to Smithers, B.C. to celebrate 100 years

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Smithers Centennial 2013

Smithereens are amassing in the Bulkley Valley.  A special 100th birthday is coming up.  Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with Gladys Atrill, who is with the homecoming committee.

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Smithers Centennial 2013 held a song contest for musicians to compose a song for the party.  The winner of that contest was Art Henkel.

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For more, visit Smithers Centennial 2013.

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Interviews:

Prince George Fire Centre fire ban

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Prince George Fire Centre issues fire ban effective 12:00 PST August 2 (Photo Credit: BC Forest Service)

All open burning, except for campfires, will be prohibited because of hot and dry weather conditions this weekend.  The fire danger rating in the Prince George Fire Centre region is high to extreme.  Other centres, including the Cariboo, Kamloops, and Coastal Fire Centres have similar bans.  If you do see a wildfire, call *5555 or 1-800-663-5555. 

For more information, visit BC Wildfire Management Branch.


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Interviews:

59-year-old Prince George boxer competes in U.S.

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The Ringside World Championships are being held in the USA (Photo Credit: http://www.ringside.com/ringside/2013-rwc)

A Prince George, B.C. boxer is fighting his second fight in 40 years because he wants to know if he's still got it.  Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with Bob Pegues who is in the U.S. right now.

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For more, visit 2013 Ringside World Championships.

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B.C. ghost town could become major natural gas hub

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An image from a story on the National about Kitsault.

An entrepreneur is trying to breathe new life into the B.C. ghost town of Kitsault by making it a major hub in the province's growing liquid natural gas infrastructure. 

Krishnan Suthanthiran, an Indo-Canadian businessman who made his fortune selling medical supplies throughout North America, bought Kitsault in 2004 for $5 million in cash. 

In January of this year, Suthanthiran formed Kitsault Energy and began pitching the empty town as an ideal location to build a liquid natural gas plant and pipeline terminal to ship B.C.'s vast natural gas resources to markets in Asia. 

Read the full story and watcht the documentary prepared for CBC's The National on cbc.ca/bc.

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Industrial leak on Prince Rupert's Watson Island

An emergency environmental response officer has been dispatched to Prince Rupert where more than a litre of either fuel or oil is leaking per day. The B.C. Ministry of Environment confirmed the leak is coming from a bunker fuel pipeline at Watson Island. An engineering firm will join the ministry officer today to assess the situation. It isn't clear what impact the leak has had, or when the leak began.