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November 2012 Archives

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Interviews:

"Nobody wants to get blown up at their job site": WorkSafe concludes mill explosion investigation

WorkSafe B.C. announced Thursday that it has completed its investigation into two sawmill explosions in northern B.C. One was at the Babine Forest Products mill in Burns Lake, the other months later at Lakeland Mills in Prince George. Both cases are being forwarded to the Crown. For more on what that means and how workers are reacting, we spoke to Daybreak's news reporter Marissa Harvey.

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Book Panel on poverty and hunger

With Food Bank day fast approaching, our book panel takes on poverty with some great suggestions.

They include:

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity by Katherine Boo

Debt-proof your Christmas : Celebrating the Holidays Without Breaking the Bank by Mary Hunt

Half Broke Horses by Jeanette Walls (author of The Glass Castle)

A Small Act (DVD - 2010) This is a documentary film directed by Jennifer Arnold
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Finance Minister Mike de Jong says BC's budget deficit estimated at 1.47 billion dollars

B.C.'s budget deficit is growing.
According to finance minister Mike de Jong, it will grow to an estimated 1.47 billion dollars.
That's going to mean cuts and could also have an effect on next year's provincial election.
For his take, Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks to former cabinent minister and current political columnist Bruce Strachan
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Interviews:

Well-known Prince George antique dealer's past puts him behind bars

Patrick Kelly is known in Prince George as a wood carver and the owner of a downtown antiques store. But he also has a past as an undercover RCMP officer and convicted murderer, and now he's been put back behind bars.Daybreak's Wil Fundal brings us the story.

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Interviews:

Northern BC's role playing gamers get their big opportunity to shine in Prince Rupert

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Playing in a Magic:The Gathering tournament can be an intense experience, such as this stare down by a player in the Northern BC qualifier in Prince Rupert (photo: George Baker/CBC)

Prince Rupert is home to Northern B.C.'s first ever Magic the Gathering regional qualifier. In the 20 years of the role-playing game, there has never been a qualifying tournament north of Hope. To get to the national championships -- a select 100 players -- you must first qualify in provincial championships. Opportunities like this don't come around very often for planeswalkers, as the players are known.  Thirty planeswalkers between the ages of 18 and 50 shuffle their decks, draw their cards and cast their spells, while  Daybreak's George Baker tries to stay out of the line of mana.


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Interviews:

Prince George sex-trade workers face tougher streets because of service cuts

The only shelter dedicated strictly to helping sex-trade workers in Prince George is down to one day per week.

As international media and human rights activists struggle to come to grips with missing women, those who live the dangerous lives of prostitution in the north struggle to find a way out. Association Advocating for Women and Children executive director Diane Nakamura speaks with Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener.

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Interviews:

Northern BC ski hills open to nine and 10 year-olds for free

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The Canadian Ski Council has come up with a solution to get kids on the ski hills this year. The council is paying for your lift tickets! CSC president and CEO Patrick Arkeveld speaks with Betsy Trumpener.

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Interviews:

Frankie Meerholz back in courts

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Alleged Prince George gangster Francoise Meerholz is back in courts. Daybreak reporter Marissa Harvey tells us why.

 

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Interviews:

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH puts international spotlight on BC's "HIGHWAY OF TEARS"




A CBC EXCLUSIVE

A human rights group that's usually probing abuse, torture, and extra-judicial killings in places like Syria and Afghanistan is now in northern BC. Human Rights Watch is researching 160 unsolved cases of missing and murdered women in northern BC. Researchers spent more than a month interviewing people between Prince Rupert and Prince George. Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener catches up with HRW's women's rights researcher Meghan Rhoad.

Rhoad is hoping those who haven't been able to talk to her can get in touch. Her email is rhoadm@hrw.org

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Interviews:

Feral Cats abound in Valemount

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Gracie is a feral cat with a new home in Valemount. The Robson Valley Spay and Neuter Society is helping cats like Gracie find a loving place to call their own.



You think your town has a cat problem? Try Valemount. Three colonies in this Robson Valley town are mating and producing kitties at an alarming rate. But fear not. A group of women are working to give these cats a second chance. Chris Dolbec speaks with Betsy Trumpener.

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Enbridge, Interviews:

Canada's big opportunity is the oilsands


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Some of the potential routes bitumen oil from Alberta could travel by to the B.C. coast.


















Alberta mayors are touring northern BC to give leaders here the hard sell on Enbridge's Northern Gateway pipeline. Deloitte Consulting oilsands lead consultant Geoff Hill tells Betsy Trumpener why he feels its important that these mayors are successful.

Read the report here


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Daybreak Shuffle:

Scales and Tails Small Animal Rescue



A new organization in Prince George wants to help unwanted rodents and reptiles and find them new homes. But after just a few weeks of being open, they've been overwhelmed with the response.


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Interviews:

Pacific Mist Chorus brings northwest women together

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Pacific Mist Chorus singers bring the sweet adeline sounds to B.C'.s Northwest.















The Pacific Mist Chorus brings women from Terrace and Prince Rupert together as one united Sweet Adeline voice. Daybreak's George Baker drops in on a rehearsal and asks what this club has meant to these women who lives are separated by 150 km of highway.


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Interviews:

Container vessel grounded south of Prince Rupert.

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Stock photo of the Hanjin Geneva -- the vessel that ran ground near Prince Rupert Tuesday night.









It's all clear now as the Hanjin Geneva is returning to the Fairview container terminal after running ground just south of Prince Rupert on Tuesday night.
Prince Rupert Port Authority spokesperson Michael Gurney gives us an eye-witness account of crews working to get the ship back to water.

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Interviews:

Prince George's Swap Shed is set to close

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Brenda Antoine with her latest find at Prince George's swap shed. She has been coming to the shed weekly since she was a little girl.

A treasure cove of northern second-hand goods is set to close. Fort George Regional District says it can't allow its Swap Shed to remain open as long as people keep fighting over second hand items. But the decision leaves some disappointed. Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata speaks with them.

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Interviews:

Williams Lake father offers $25,000 for information on missing son

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Ken Walton is offering $25,000 for information on the whereabouts of his son Tyler.





















Williams Lake father Ken Walton last saw his son Tyler in 2009. Police have no idea what happened to Tyler. But Ken says he's offering a substantial reward for anyone who does. He speaks with Daybreak's Marissa Harvey
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Interviews:

Prince Rupert business owner tries his luck on CBC's The Big Decision

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Entrepeneur Jim Treliving is one of the investors on CBC's Big Decision.













Bruce MacDonald owns a seaplane charter business in Prince Rupert that he wants to transform. He's hoping to encourage more tourism with his company that has for so long been tied to the resource sector. But in a time when the tourism industry is spinning its wheels and investment cash is hard to come by, can MacDonald win over CBC's Big Decision entrepreneurs? He speaks with Daybreak's Leisha Grebinski.

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The Playlist:

The Playlist: Track one, side one

It's all about making a good first impression with our newest playlist: great first songs on great albums.

  • To kick things off, a Canadian classic: The Guess Who's "American Woman" from the album of the same name
  • We stay in Winnipeg for track two, with the more contemporary Weakerthans. The opening song on their album Reunion Tour is "Civil Twilight."
  • Listener Henry Braun adds another layer, going with track one, side one on Led Zeppelin I: "Good Times, Bad Times."
  • After three solid rock tracks, we turn to Canadian chanteuse Jill Barber to bring things down a bit. Joyce Godfrey of McBride suggests "Mischievous Moon", the opening track on the album of the same name.
  • Another contemporary female vocalists via listener Laura Leelie: Adele's "Rolling in the Deep", track one on 21.
  • Back to the CanRock with track six of our track ones: The Tragically Hip and "Blow at High Dough."
  • Phil Saunders suggests a song he used to cover with his band: "I Will Follow" from U2.
  • Emily Fisher has a local group with a great opening tune: Vanderhoof's Rosewood's Diary and the song "Hey Shame" from their latest, Please Take Courage.
  • Here's a pretty obvious one: "Life Is A Highway", the first track on Tom Cochrane's Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.
  • And another Canadian classic: Our Lady Peace's opener "Superman's Dead."
  • And the Barenaked Ladies' "One Week."
  • Moira Green from Dawson Creek suggested we check out the band 7horse and their song "Meth Lab Zoso Sticker."
  • Neil Young was unhappy with the sound of his first album, so for his second he assembled the band Crazy Horse for a liver, rockier feel. The first track: "Cinnamon Girl."
  • And we end with the first track of Montreal's Stars ..Set Yourself On Fire: "Your Ex-Lover is Dead."
       

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Interviews:

Prince Rupert basketball icon creates high school course

For three decades Mel Bishop has coached the Prince Rupert Rainmakers basketball team. Now he's created the first-ever basketball course at Charles Hays Secondary School. Daybreak's George Baker dropped in on the early-morning class.


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Interviews:

Highway of Tears to be featured on CBS mega program 48 hours

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Many Northern British Columbians are well aware of the missing women on the notorious Highway of Tears. But a major US current affairs show brings this story to millions of Americans on Saturday. Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener speaks with 48 hours correspondent Peter Van Zant.

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Interviews:

Oil train to Alaska from Alberta could eliminate debate over Northern Gateway

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G Sevens Generation Ltd. isn't a household name yet. But CEO Matt Vickers hopes to soon draw attention to his company's plans to build an oil railway from Alberta to Alaska -- and eliminate the need for Enbridge's Northern Gateway pipeline. He speaks with Betsy Trumpener.

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Interviews:

New gun show rules welcomed by gun enthusiasts

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Canada's new gun show rules are supported by many gun aficionados in this country. But not Canada's Chief Fire Arms Officers. Despite that, they say in the entertainments business the show must go on. National Firearms Association president Sheldon Clare joins Leisha Grebinski.

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Interviews:

B.C. government not tracking water use by industry, says study

A new study released this morning warns there are gaping holes in B.C.'s water license program, and claims the province has no idea how much water is being used by industry. The report was written by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Ben Parfitt is one of it's authors, and he spoke with Betsy Trumpener.

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Interviews:

Employment Insurance running out for displaced Burns Lake mill workers

Employment insurance is winding down for many of the displaced sawmill workers in Burns Lake. Others lost their safety net more than a month ago, and bank accounts for these people are already running thin. Hundreds of people lined up at yesterday's job fair hoping to find local work, including Leona West and her husband Dwayne Joseph. West spoke with Leisha Grebisnki.

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Interviews:

Lawyer outlines human rights tribunal case against Tim Hortons

Four Mexican workers have filed a human rights complaint against Tim Hortons.Four Mexican workers claim their right were violated  while they worked at two Tim Hortons in Dawson Creek. They have filed a complaint with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal in Vancouver. Leisha Grebinski spoke to their lawyer, Eugene Kung of the B.C. Public Interest Advocacy Centre. None of these claims have been proven.

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You can learn more about this story on the CBC News website.

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Interviews:

Prince Rupert war veterans bring back their legion

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The Prince Rupert Royal Canadian Legion branch is renovating a Mexican restaurant to return a legion hall to the city for the first time in eight years. Daybreak's George Baker drops in for a preview before the grand opening on Remembrance Day.

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Interviews:

Still no decision on Canpotex Prince Rupert terminal

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Saskatchewan potash consortium Canpotex got the go ahead this week from the federal government to build its Prince Rupert terminal. But there is no indication yet that the company actually plans to do so. Daybreak's George Baker explains.

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Interviews:

Government, company say no conflict in gas-well study

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A gas well (CBC)
The Peace Environment and Safety Trustees Society environmental group says they are concerned a company hired by the B.C. government to study oil and gas health risks in the Peace Region may be biased because of its previous work for the industry. But both the government and the company say the report will be based solely on science.



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You can read more about this story at cbc.ca/news.

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Interviews:

MLA John Rustad defends mass burning of timber for energy projects

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This map shows the Northwest Transmission Line being built from the Skeena Substation, near Terrace, to a soon to be built substation at Bob Quinn Lake. (BC Hydro)
This week, CBC and Daybreak reported that a 340 kilometre swath of  of B.C. trees are being cut and burned to make way for the Northwest Transmission Line. B.C. Hydro told us contracters may sell some of the wood,but shipping the rest of it to mills or biofuel plants isn't economical, so it's being burned as slash.

This happens as the government's been warning that B.C.'s timber supply is in trouble and jobs could be lost.  Liberal MLA John Rustad chaired B.C.'s Timber Supply Committee. He spoke with Leisha Grebinski about the issue.

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You can read more about this story on cbc.ca/news.

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Interviews:

Gumboot Girls: Adventure, Love & Survival on the North Coast of British Columbia

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In the 1970s many women migrated west to the rugged north coast in search of adventure and love. Now the stories of 34 of those women have been compiled in a new book by Lou Allison and Jane Wilde. They spoke to Leisha Grebinski.

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You can find Gumboot Girls on Facebook and Muskeg Press.

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Interviews:

Prince George startup wants to map Aboriginal oral history online

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A screenshot from the landsongs.com demo.

Geolocation and data storage may be the result of highly technical thinking. But for Will Cadell it's all about the stories. Now the Prince George based web developer has a new project aimed at bringing traditional stories into the digital age. He spoke with Betsy Trumpener.

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You can learn more at landsongs.com or see its profile in the Changemakers voting contest.

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Interviews:

Hundreds of kilometres of trees being slashed and burned for megaenergy projects

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A slash pile on Highway 37.

CBC has learned that huge swaths of trees are being burned to make way for energy megaprojects. In the Peace, foresters are complaining about trees being slashed and burned for the oil and gas industry.

Sharon Glover is the CEO of the Association of B.C. Foresters. She told Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener no one even knows how much wood is being burned.

We also heard from Fort Nelson First Nation band councillor and former chief Kathi Dickie. She says there are more logs being removed by the oil and gas industry than were ever taken by the forest industry. You can hear both those interviews below.

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The issue is not just in the northeast. In the northwest contractors are clearing the way for the Northwest Transmission Line. To do so, hundreds of kilometres of trees are being cut and burned in slash piles from Terrace to Bob Quinn. To explain why, Betsy Trumpener spoke to B.C. Hydro's Lesley Wood, who says the disposal of wood is up to the contractors.

Independent MLA Bob Simpson says the burning is disturbing, and a "misuse of a public resource", especially given the challenges facing the forest industry.

We also heard from Sharon Glover, CEO of B.C. Professional Foresters who says the burning of vast amounts of timber is a major problem, and that she suspects some of the wood being burned could be sold or used for bioenergy projects.

Listen to the full story below:

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Interviews:

Reviewing Prince George's core review

The city of Prince George paid KPMG $285,000 for a core services review report. Its purpose was to find "efficiencies" and save the city money. Ideas in the report include cracking down on parking violations, increasing user fees for fields and pools, and charging people to remove snow from their driveways. For their views, we reached Opinion250 columnist Peter Ewart and city councillor Cameron Stolz.

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You can read the full report on our website.


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City of Prince George Core Services Review Final Report

KPMG has presented the City of Prince George with their core services review report. Recommendations include the selling of city-owned properties, reducing garbage collection and adding door-to-door recycling collection, and charging a fee for the removal of snow from driveways.

It is now up to council to decide which options to pursue.

You can read the full report below or open it in a new window.

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Former Peace area dentist barred from practicing

The College of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia has disciplined a former Peace-area dentist and stripped him of his ability to practice after he was found guilty of incompetent practice and professional misconduct. Among other things, he was found guilty of pulling teeth without consent and inviting a patient to sit in his lap. You can see the allegation and findings at  cdsbc.org.

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Interviews:

Dease Lake School rescues golden eagle with help of Hallowe'en costume

The staff at Dease Lake School might consider wearing firefighting gear to work more often. It worked out well when the school got an unexpected visitor on Wednesday. Here is principal Brent Daniel and librarian Elisia Gillies with the story of a golden eagle who dropped in on them.

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Interviews:

Can Haida Gwaii's hot spring return?

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The natural hot springs on Haida Gwaii's Hot Spring Island ran dry after Saturday's earthquake. It's not yet clear how it happened, but Michale Bostock may have an idea- as well as some clue if they will ever return. He's a professor of seismology with the University of British Columbia.

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CBC B.C. Roundup, Interviews:

Earthquake dries up Haida Gwaii's Hot Spring Island

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Hot Spring Island photo by Anne Lazerevitch on Flickr

The earthquake that hit Haida Gwaii this past Saturday may have permanent consequences for the tourism industry there. Hot Spring Island is a popular destination for locals and visitors, attracted by the ability to enjoy a natural hot spring overlooking the ocean. But now the springs are dry and cold. Leisha Grebinski spoke to Ernie Gladstone, superintendent of the Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve.

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