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October 2012 Archives

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Interviews:

Seismologist answers questions about Haida Gwaii aftershocks

After the earthquake, there are aftershocks. Some are quite large and have members of northwestern communities wondering how long they will continue and if they pose a risk to their safety. To answer these questions, we reached University of British Columbia seismologist Michael Bostock.

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Interviews:

Spirit bear takes journey from Smithers to Kamloops

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Clover the Kermode bear is the first of his kind in captivity. The B.C. Wildlife Park is in the process of building him his own special enclosure, and he is already bonding with his handler, Artice Fleck (Josh Pagé/CBC).


There are probably only a few hundred Kermode bears, or spirit bears, in the world. Most live on the central and north coast of B.C. And then there's Clover. Clover's journey is quite the story, starting as an orphan cub coming into the care of the Norther Lights Wildlife Shelter in Smithers, followed by a re-release into the wild only to have life change once again....

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Interviews:

Run organizers prepared to shovel snow for provincial tournament

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This is the scene in Moore's Meadow, where the cross-country running championships are to be held this weekend.

Cross country running normally conjures up images of running shoes, green grass and high shorts. But that image is about to be shattered this weekend in Prince George. Brian Martinson
is organizing the B.C. High School Cross Country Championships there. The only problem? The piles of snow all over the trail.


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Prince Rupert vs Prince George pumpkin carving contest

For Hallowe'en, we pitted Prince George associate producer Wil Fundal and Prince Rupert associate producer George Baker against each other in a pumpkin carving contest. Who wins? Who loses? Let us know your thoughts.

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Wil got an early start, finding a guide to follow from the internet.

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George went free-form, carving out an interpretation of himself after a long day's work.

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Listener Photos:

Photo: Snowy coyote

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"Peeping Dog" by tuchodi

This photo of a coyote checking out the snow-covered houses in Fort St John was submitted to our Flickr pool by tuchodi. We'd love to see your snow photos- especially as you try to winterize your Hallowe'en costumes. Join the Flickr pool, email your shots to daybreaknorth[at]cbc.ca or tweet them to @daybreaknorth.

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Interviews:

"If there had been a tsunami... the people of Masset would not have survived."

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Margo Hearn snapped this photo of people evacuating Masset on Saturday night. She says, "Had there been a tsunami, we would not have survived because traffic was crawling."



























People are still sorting out exactly what happened and what could have been differently after Saturday night's earthquake near Haida Gwaii. Margo Hearn is a columnist with the Haida Gwaii Observor who was in the middle of the evacuation after tsunami warnings were issued for the islands. She paints a stark picture of confusion, congestion, and a potentially fatal situation, telling Leisha Grebinski "If there had been a tsunami immediately after the earthquake... the people of Masset would not have survived." And she still has concerns about the lack of communication during and after the quake.

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Interviews:

Cancer patients in the north now able to stay closer to family

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Premier Christy Clark views the new radiation equipment at the Cancer Centre for the North (Marissa Harvey/CBC)

For the first time, cancer patients in northern B.C. will be able to get radiation treatment in Prince George. The official opening of the B.C. Cancer Agency Centre for the North was on Monday. Daybreak's Marissa Harvey was there, and brought back some sounds and voices -- from a surgeon, a cancer survivor, and B.C.'s premier.


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Listener Photos:

Share your snow pictures in the Daybreak Flickr pool

We're pretty hardcore in Northern BC. Yes, that's snow and soccer.

Photo by Chris Leboe: "We're pretty hardcore in Northern BC. Yes, that's snow and soccer."

Snow is falling from Quesnel to Fort St John, and we want to see how it's affecting your neighbourhood. Share your snow photos with us in our new Flickr photo pool. It's a fast and easy way to get your view of everything that's happening around the north.

(Don't have Flickr? Tweet your photo to @DaybreakNorth or email daybreaknorth[at]cbc.ca)

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Interviews:

Breaking Bad in Prince Rupert? Crystal meth chemicals seized at port

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AMC's Breaking Bad portrays the crystal meth industry in the southern United States.

It seems that in addition to increased trade, the Port of Prince Rupert is attracting illegal activity as well. Last week, the Canada Border Services Agency seized more that 14 tonnes of precursor chemicals that go into making drugs like crystal meth, ecstaty, and the date-rape drug. Luke Chicoine is an RCMP corporal, and the National Coordinator for Synthetic Drugs and Pharmaceuticals. He says though Prince Rupert is small, it's potential for the drug trade is large.

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Interviews:

After the earthquake: questions and surprise

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A 7.7-earthquake struck near Haida Gwaii on Saturday, and was felt from Prince Rupert to Quesnel. It was one of the largest in Canadian history, though damage was minimal, it still has people talking.

Slow tsunami warnings raise questions

Complaints were heard in some communities about the flow of information from Emergency Management B.C. The 7.7 magnitude quake struck at 8:04 p.m. PT Saturday, but it was 8:55 p.m. by the time Emergency Management B.C. was able to issue its first tsumami warning on Twitter, long after U.S. warnings had been issued at 8:13 p.m. PT and news stations had already begun reporting on the earthquake.

In Prince Rupert, several hundred kilometres from the epicentre, some people complain they heard no emergency messages to seek higher ground.

Here is a response from B.C.'s minster responsible for public safety, Justice Minster Shirley Bond.

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More on this story.


Northwest mayor relates his experience

Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener spoke with Andrew Merilees, the Mayor of Masset, about what he felt, saw, and heard during Canada's largest earthquake for more than 60 years.


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The science of earthquakes

John Cassidy is an earthquake seismologist with Natural Resources Canada Pacific Geoscience Centre based in Victoria. He spoke with Leisha Grebinski about the scope of this weekend's quake, and what it means for future events.

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Audrey Auger faces her own demons as she walks down the Highway of Tears

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Audrey Auger, left, is putting the pieces back together after six years of wondering what happened to her daughter Aeglah (not pictured)

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Prince George mother Audrey Auger lost her daughter Aelagh in 2006, along the so-called Highway of Tears. For years, following her daughters death, Audrey lived on the streets. Buried in pain, she made herself disappear. But recenty... she says, she woke up. Audrey shares how she came back from the brink. She speaks with CBC's Robert Doane.
















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Parents in Sandspit look for answers about asbestos exposure at local elementary


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Asbestos is considered very hazardous in the right conditions.


Parents on Haida Gwaii in the community of Sandspit are shocked to learn their children may have been exposed to asbestos at their elementary school. Daybreak reporter Marissa Harvey has more.

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Interviews:

Why the 'R' word is more hurtful than some in the north believe

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The 'R' Word has become an issue about respect.

From the Twitter-verse to the real world. There's been intense reaction to a conservative pundit's tweet. Ann Coulter said this week that U-S President Barack Obama was QUOTE a "retard." Following that, Special Olympics athlete John Franklin Stephens responded with a letter.



We play tape of Stephens conversation with "As it Happens" host Carol Off.
And then for some perspective,we speak with Wendy Brophy
 Brophy is program director at AiMHi.

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Books, Interviews:

Book Panel: Spooky stories

The Prince George Public Library's Andrea Palmer and Erin Pfliger make up Daybreak's monthly book panel. Up for discussion this week: spooky stories, and why we like to be scared.

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Books discussed (click on the covers to find them on Goodreads):

The Shining by Stephen King: One of the classics that our panel thinks might be scarier in book from.

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My Friend Dahmer by Derf Backderf: A graphic novel that is definitely not for kids-- a haunting memoir of growing up with serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer.
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White Horse by Alex Adams: A woman on a quest might not sound scary, but when the backdrop is the end of the world, it it adds some fright.

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The Haunting of Hill House
by Shirley Jackson: It may be old, but it's still chilling.
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Ghosts Caught on Film: Photographs of the Paranormal by Dr. Melvyn Willin: Photographs of ghosts.
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The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman: The hit TV series started as this dark graphic novel.
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Interviews:

Trying to stop gang recruitment in Prince George

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The scene of an arson in November 2010 suspected to be linked to gangs in Prince George. (Betsy Trumpener/CBC)

Prince George has been named Canada's most dangerous city and has a number of active gangs in the community. Now city leaders and youth are trying to cut gangs off from the bottom by curtailing recruitment of new members.

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Interviews:

In the Club: Prince George's Yalenka Dancers

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One of Prince George's Yalenka Ukrainian Dance club's earlier troupes. Image from Yalenka.ca.













We're starting a new series on Daybreak called "In the Club." It will look at interesting groups hiding across the northern landscape. Up first: Donita Kuzma tells us about Prince George's Yalenka Dancers.

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You can learn more at yalenka.ca.

If you know of a club worth covering, email us daybreaknorth [at] cbc [dot] ca.

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Interviews:

Mine defends hiring Chinese workers for Tumbler Ridge project

The B.C. Federation of Labour is calling for a suspension of Canada's Temporary Foreign Worker  program and an investigation into how roughly 200 Chinese nationals were recruited to work at the Murray River underground coal mine near Tumbler Ridge. Jody Shimkus is the HD Mining's Vice President of Environmental and Regulatory Affairs, and she defended her company's decision.

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Interviews:

Prince George military base was on high alert during Cuban Missile Crisis

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Natural Resources Canada map of Baldy Hughes site (via radomes.org)

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Baldy Hughes insignia (via radomes.org)
Fifty years ago this week, the world was watching leaders of the United States and the Soviet Union engage in high-stakes politics in what is known as the Cuban Missile Crisis. But in Prince George, military personnel at Baldy Hughes, didn't just watch: they locked down their base and loaded their guns. Here is that story.

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Enbridge, Interviews:

Enbridge Vice-President responds to legislature protest

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Thousands of people gathered on the lawn of the Victoria legislature yesterday, protesting the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline project.Janet Holder is Enbridge's vice-president of western access. She spoke with Leisha Grebinski about how the company hopes to win British Columbians over.

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Interviews:

Retired UNBC professor unveils Canada's secret role during Cuban Missile Crisis

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Key players of the Cuban Missile Crisis: Cuban leader Fidel Castro (top left), Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev (bottom left) and U.S. President John F. Kennedy. It turns out Canada was more pivotal than most people think, as well.

50 years ago the Cuban Missile Crisis was in full swing. Retired UNBC professor Don Munton has been researching the pivotal event in his new role as an Arthur Schelesinger fellow at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library, and he's found that Canada played a far more prominent role during the crisis than most people think. 

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Interviews:

Seniors learn the ins and outs of online dating

Smithers reisdent David Harris recently wrote an article on the ins and outs of online dating for seniors. He joined Leisha Grebinski to explain why he and other elderly northerners are turning to the online dating world.

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Interviews:

Proposed cuts to Greyhound bus routes worry northern communities

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Greyhound 1015 by Stephen Rees/Flickr

Northern communities are worried about Greyhound's request to reduce the number of routes it services, citing cost, convenience, and public safety. Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata brings in voices from Greyhound, politicians and passengers to find out what's at stake.


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You can read Greyhound's application and supply your own comments on the website of the Passenger Transportation Board.

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Interviews:

Union and jobs minister go head-to-head on Chinese miner controversy

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Controversy continues to swirl over the importation of Chinese workers to man a Tumbler Ridge coal mine. Mark Olsen is the president of the Bargaining Council of B.C. Building Trades Unions. He says provincial and foreign governments are abusing the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. Pat Bell is B.C.'s jobs minister, and he says there are a lot of misconceptions about what is happening. Leisha Grebinski spoke to them both.

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Related interviews:

- Union says Jobs Minister is "cheerleader" for company importing Chinese miners to Tumbler Ridge
- Mining Association says local workforce is dwindling as companies import miners from China
- Are temporary foreign workers being used as a permanent solution to labour shortage?

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Interviews:

Haida leader explains why he voted against massive ocean fertilization project

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(Haida Gwaii - Masset Beach by douglasjason34/Flickr)

All week, we've been following the story about a controversial project on Haida Gwaii. It's aimed at restoring salmon populations by dumping iron-laden dust into the ocean in the world's largest geo-engineering experiment ever. But it's attracted international criticism from scientists and environmentalists alike.

The project was supported by the village of Old Massett in a vote of 66% to 44%. Arnie Bellis is among those who voted "no." He's the former vice president of the Council of the Haida Nation and he spoke with Leisha Grebinski about the vote and what this project is doing to the Haida's international reputation.

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Related interviews:

- Artificial plankton plan in Haida Gwaii attracting international controversy
- Company defends dumping iron dust into Haida Gwaii ocean in salmon restoration project
- Oceanographer says Haida Gwaii iron project has more risk than reward

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Interviews:

Cows judge B.C. music competition

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Coast Symphony Orchestra Music Director and Conductor Edette Gagné leads a quartet of classically-trained musicians in a warm-up performance for dairy cows at the Valedoorn Dairy Farm in Agassiz, B.C. The BC Dairy Association's "Music Makes More Milk" contest wants you to compose songs for cows in order to naturally increase milk production. (photo courtesy of BC Dairy Association)

The B.C Dairy Association has launched a songwriting competition that will be judged entirely by cows. To explain, Leisha Grebinski spoke with dairy farmer Tom Hoogendoorn and B.C. Dairy Association executive director Dave Eto.

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You can find the contest at musicmakesmoremilk.com.

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CBC B.C. Roundup:

From lovestruck elk to earthquakes in Fort St. John, other CBC B.C. stories you'll want to hear



Here's a look at some stories that have been airing on other CBC B.C. radio programs that you might like to hear:

And make sure you check out everything that's been on Daybreak North this week by browsing our archives.

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Interviews:

Fears of violent gang prevent Nak'azdli reserve members from sharing torture information

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Fribjon Bjornson

Fears of a violent gang are keeping some northern B.C. residents from sharing information about the torture and decapitation of a young man following a party last winter, CBC News has learned.

The severed head of Fribjon Bjornson, 28, was found in a vacant house on the Nak'azdli reserve near Fort St. James on Feb. 3, three weeks after he was last seen about 60 kilometres away at a 7-Eleven in Vanderhoof, B.C.

The rest of his body was never found and no one has been charged in the case.

But Bjornson's parents say residents of the reserve have already told them what happened to their son. They say those same residents are unwilling to share what they know with police, in part, because of fear of retaliation by the gang.

CBC reporter Eric Rankin has been looking into this case. He spoke with Betsy Trumpener.

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You can read more about this story at cbc.ca/news.

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Enbridge, Interviews:

New research could detect pipeline leaks before they happen

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The proposed route of the Northern Gateway pipeline.
Questions about how Enbridge would respond to a potential oil spill in its proposed Northern Gateway pipeline project are still being asked, and it isn't yet clear what the company's plans are in case of a disaster. But a Canadian engineer says he has the technology to stop leaks before they even happen. Walied Moussa is a professor in the department of mechanical engineering at the University of Alberta.He spoke with Betsy Trumpener.


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Interviews:

Oceanographer says Haida Gwaii iron project has more risk than reward

In a controversial move, roughly 100 tonnes of iron-laden dust was dumped into the ocean in the world's largest geo-engineering experiment ever. Defenders say it will help bring back salmon populations, but critics say it is environmentally risky. Barb Fagetter is an oceanographer based in Prince Rupert. She spoke with Leisha Grebinski.

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Interviews:

Is "bullying" a strong enough word for what happened to Amanda Todd?

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Amanda Todd


The story of Amanda Todd has dominated headlines around the world for a number of days now, and with it a renewed outcry for an end to bullying. But Fazeela Jiwa argues that "bullying" is too broad a term to accurately describe what happened to Todd. In a column for the Georgia Strait, she wrote:

"'Bullying' glosses over structural reasons for violence--reasons like race, gender, ability, and sexuality, among a myriad of insidious social hierarchies."
Jiwa spoke with Betsy Trumpener about her concerns.

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External link: "Bullying" is too vague when we're dealing with sexism and misogyny



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Enbridge, Interviews:

Enbridge criticized for "incomplete" answers

Protesters outside the hearings for #Enbridge #NGP hearings in #princegoerge. #CBC #dbn http://twitter.yfrog.com/kfa03vpj

The Joint Review Panel hearings into the proposed Northern Gateway pipline are underway in Prince George. At the centre is the B.C government and Enbridge's expert panel of witnesses. The the first round of questioning resulted in the government stating it was "concerned by the responses from Enbridge". CBC national reporter Curt Petrovich has been following this story, he spoke with Betsy Trumpener.

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Interviews:

Company defends dumping iron dust into Haida Gwaii ocean in salmon restoration project

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(Thruhike 98/Flickr)

Roughly 100-tonnes of iron-laden dust was dumped off the coast of Haida Gwaii, in a controversial geo-engineering experiment. The project is aimed at regrowing the salmon population, but critics say the science behind the project is dubious and breaks international law. John Disney is the economic development officer for Old Masset. He spoke with Leisha Grebinski.


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Interviews:

What secrets are inside the China-Canada trade deal?

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Chinese President Hu Jintao and Stephen Harper at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit. (Sergei Karpukhin / Reuters)


Canada's new investment partnership with China is 17 years in the making. It goes into effect at the end of the month and critics like the NDP's Nathan Cullenare concerned that the federal government is avoiding talking about the potential ramifications for Canadians. To find out more about just what those ramifications are, Leisha Grebinski reached Maclean's columnist Paul Wells.

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External link: Canada-China investment: Big Risk in the Fine Print


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Interviews:

Artificial plankton plan in Haida Gwaii attracting international controversy

American entrepreneur Russ George has a plan to grow artificial plankton by placing iron sulphate on the ocean floor near Haida Gwaii. It was paid for by the village of Old Masset, but is attracting international controversy.


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Interviews:

Former prime minister Paul Martin in Fort Nelson

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Former prime minister Paul Martin is in Fort Nelson on Tuesday. (paulmartin.ca)

Former Prime Minister Paul Martin is in Fort Nelson this week with a focus on closing the gap in education between Aboriginal Canadians and the rest of the country's population. He spoke with Leisha Grebinski.

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Safe Online Outreach Society

This morning we talked to Merlyn Horton of the Safe Online Outreach Society works with students, teachers, and parents in B.C. on education and solutions to cyberbullying. You can find them online at safeonlineoutreach.com.

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Interviews:

Are temporary foreign workers being used as a permanent solution to labour shortage?

Here in northern B.C., temporary foreign workers are being recruited to fill the worker shortage gap as part of Canada's Temporary Foreign Workers Program. It is supposed to be a short term fix for the country's labor woes, but there's concern with the growing number of visiting workers. Howard Ramos is an associate professor of sociology with Dalhousie University. He spoke with Leisha Grebinski about the issue.

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Interviews:

The case for co-existing with grizzly bears

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Photo from Charlie Russell's website, cloudline.org









Grizzly bears are one of the most feared animals of the north. They're strong, powerful, and can be deadly. But Charlie Rusell says they're mostly misunderstood. He spent twelve years living with grizzlies and is on a quest to show the world humans and grizzlies can live in harmony. He's spoke with Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata.

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Interviews:

Andrew Nikiforuk says our use of fossil fuel is modern-day slavery

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In his new book The Energy of Slaves, author Andrew Nikiforuk argues that our fossil fuel powered machines are modern day versions of slaves: they cook our food, transport us great distances and we are completely dependent on them. He speaks with Andrew Kurjata about the moral implications of B.C.'s focus on energy production and use.

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Interviews:

Mining Association says local workforce is dwindling as companies import miners from China

The Murray River coalmine project southwest of Tumbler Ridge is attracting controversy for plans to import 200 Chinese workers to fill jobs. Yesterday on the program we spoke to Stephen Hunt of the United Steelworkers union, who said the jobs should be filled locally. While she can't speak to the specifics of this case, Karina Barino explains there is a dwindling supply of local miners to fill these sorts of jobs. She's the President and CEO of the Mining Association of British Columbia.

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Interviews:

High testosterone levels pose danger (of moose) at UNBC

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Moose at UNBC may be a great photo opportunity, but they also pose a danger. Photo from Roy Rea/UNBC

Moose have once again been sighted near UNBC. While you may be tempted to get up close for a look, instructor Roy Rea warns against the idea.

You can learn more about how best to stay safe around wildlife at B.C.'s northern university, visit unbc.ca/safety/wildlife.html.

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Interviews:

Feature interview with David Black on his plans to build an oil refinery in Kitimat

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Douglas Channel, the proposed termination point for an oil pipeline in the Enbridge Northern Gateway project, is pictured in an aerial view in Kitimat, B.C., on Jan. 10, 2012. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press)

David Black is best known as the media mogul behind Black Press, a chain of newspapers covering British Columbia and beyond. But now he's entering the energy game with plans to build an oil refinery in Kitimat that would refine all the Albertan crude oil the Northern Gateway pipeline could ship. He's in Prince Rupert to pitch the idea, and he joined Leisha Grebinski for a feature interview.

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Interviews:

Union says Jobs Minister is "cheerleader" for company importing Chinese miners to Tumbler Ridge

Hundred of Chinese nationals could come to B.C. in the coming years as more mines are developed.
The Murray River coalmine project southwest of Tumbler Ridge is attracting controversy for plans to import 200 Chinese workers to fill jobs. The companies backing the mines say there aren't enough Canadian workers with the skills and experience needed to work underground, and in an interview on B.C. Almanac yesterday, Minister of Jobs Pat Bell said "While we are very good at large, open pit mines, we are not very good at underground coal mines."

Stephen Hunt disagrees. He's the Western Canada Director for the United Steelworkers, and he told Leisha Grebinski that Canada is a leader in mining techniques and safety, and accused Bell of simply being a cheerleader for the companies.

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(photo: Teck Resources/Canada Press)

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Interviews:

Cheap Hallowe'en costume ideas

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(Morgan Mae/Flickr)

Between candy and costumes, Hallowe'en can be expenisve. But as Shiral Tobin tells us, there are some creative ways you can save cash this October.

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Interviews:

How long should I warm my vehicle up? and other questions about winter driving

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(siRRonWong/Flickr)

Winter driving season is almost upon us, so we called in vehicle expert Kevin Grose to answer your questions about winter driving, including when to get your tires changed, how to use antifreeze, and how long to let your vehicle warm up in cold weather.

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Interviews:

Volunteers clean-up tsunami debris in Oval Bay

Daybreak's Leisha Grebinski joined volunteers on a mission to clean up an isolated beach on B.C.'s north coast.

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Interviews:

B.C.'s former Deputy Minister of Environment has some questions for Enbridge

Tom Gunton is B.C.'s former Deputy Minister of Environment and current director of Simon Fraser University's Resource and Environmental Planning Program. He says based on evidence submitted by Enbridge, a project the size of Northern Gateway would have 46 spills every four years, and that there has been no reduction in the oil spill rate from 1990 to 2010. To him this raises a question:

"If you are so convinced that this is a low-risk project, why are you as a company unwilling to accept the liability for the cost of oil spills?"

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Residents impacted by Encana gas leak disappointed with settlement agreement

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A B.C. Oil and Gas Commission report blamed the gas leak on sand in the flowing gas that eroded the inside of the pipes.
On November 22nd, 2009, a group of about 15 residents in Tomslake detected a sulfur-like smell coming from a nearby natural gas pipeline operated by Encana. Residents reported they hear a sound like a jet taking of, and saw a plume of smoke rolling in. The residents were evacuated from their homes for several hours while the leak was being repaired.

An investigation found that 30,000 cubic metres of natural gas was released into the environment, and that the company had faulty equipment, failed to notify residents of the risk in time, and did not co-ordinate its emergency response with the local RCMP during the incident.

Some residents reported health problems following this incident, a number of which continue even today. Despite these problems, most people directly impacted by the leak were not part of a recent settlement agreement between Encana and the community. Daybreak reporter Marissa Harvey brings us this story.

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Interviews:

100-year-old steam engine runs again

Fort George Park Steam train

Photo by Jack Bowling on Flickr

The Little Prince has a long history. The tiny steam engine ran B.C. tracks during the early days of the railroad and was even present at the driving of the Last Spike.Then it retired to the Exploration Park museum in Fort George Park in Prince George, giving rides to children and families every summer. But as it gets older, the number of people who know how to look after it get fewer and far between. Earlier this year, Exploration Place manager Tracy Calogheros explained why the Little Prince would not be running this summer.

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But now, new engineers have been found and the Little Prince has been refurbished. Daybreak's Wil Fundal met the men who gave the Little Prince the steam to keep on going.

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Interviews:

Charlie Wenjack: The runaway from residential schools

Charlie Wenjack was 12-years-old when he ran away from Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School in Kenora. He had been gone a week when his body was discovered beside the railroad tracks near Redditt on Oct. 23, 1966. His parents weren't told that he was missing.

They didn't know he was dead until a plane arrived near their home at Ogoki Post (Marten Falls First Nation), carrying his body. His death brought national media attention to the plight of residential school students. But Charlie's sisters say it has yet to bring change.

This documentary was prepared by the CBC's Jody Porter for a special series from CBC Thunder Bay called Dying for an Education.

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Interviews:

Should B.C. raise its highway speed limits?

Barrier Installation: After

Every year, roughly half a million traffic tickets are issued in B.C., most for speed infractions. But one organization wants to reform speed limit laws. Ian Tootill is a co-founder of Sense B.C., an organization dedicated to putting in place what they call "realistic highway speed limits."

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photo from B.C Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure on Flickr

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Highway of Tears recommendations still not in place after six years

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A totem of a weeping mother in a village in northwest BC, not far from the "Highway of Tears" (Betsy Trumpener)

Six years ago, the Highway of Tears symposium gathered families of missing women with politicians and policy makers. They shared stories and put forward 33 recommendations to make northern highways safer. Don Sabo authored the report containing those recommendations. He says six years on, very little has been accomplished.

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"Somehow, poop got on your food": explaining the beef recall

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E. coli O157:H7 can contaminate ground beef during the butchering process. (iStock)
As meat products are recalled across Canada, people might be wondering if they are at risk for E. coli contamination. Greg Thibault is the manager of Public Health Protection for Northern Health. He joined us in studio to explain how E. coli and other food-borne threats work, and what you can do to avoid them.

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Learn more about E. coli and how it spreads at cbc.ca/news.

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Tropical north? Prince George to get hotter and dryer

The Sunset in San Clemente California

Are the days of heading south for warm weather coming to an end? The city of Prince George recently completed a study outlining how climate change would affect the region. Dan Adamson and Craig Delong helped lead the study, and they came to CBC's Prince George studio to try and predict the future.

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You can read the report in Prince George's council agenda for October 1, accessible in html and pdf format.

Photo by Trey Ratcliffe on Flickr.

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Should northern B.C. elect more independent politicians?

In a recent column, Prince George Free Press managing editor Bill Phillips suggested northern B.C. should do away with political parties and elect a slate of independent MLAs. He believes it would let them focus on their constituents and the issues that are unique to the north. He told Betsy Trumpener more about his idea.

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Corporal normalcy

Allegations about John Furlong's time in Burns Lake continues to make headlines across Canada. The former CEO of the 2010 Olympics denies he ever abused students at Immaculata School in the late 60s.Without addressing the allegations directly, UNBC researcher Sarah de Leeuw explains why missionary schools often relied on corporal punishment as a way of driving the 'Indian' out of aboriginal students.

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The cat's meow

Dan O'Connor is the voice of the Prince George Cougars and is he excited. That's normally a word that isn't associated with a Cougars' season, particularly given last season's last place finish. But the team is 3 and 0 and when things are going well at the CN Centre, one doesn't speak ill of the Cats.

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