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July 2012 Archives

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Music festivals, photo contest, and show highlights: Keep in touch while we're off the air

Daybreak North will be off the air for a week as our team works on putting together new stories for the coming season. In the meantime, we will be contributing to Daybreak South, who will be airing in our place from July 30 to August 3. In the meantime, you can catch members of the Daybreak team at two CBC-sponsored events: the Kispiox Valley Music Festival and ArtsWells.

You can also keep on contributing to our Ultimate Canadian Hip-Hop Playlist and the Show Us Your Summer Photo Contest, both of which will be resumed when we return. Meanwhile, check out the photo gallery and some recent show highlights below, and we'll see you after the August long weekend.

Show Us Your Summer Photo Contest:



Show highlights for July 23-27:

July 23:


July 24:


July 25:


July 26:

July 27:



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Interviews:

Prince George river float attracts R.C.M.P. attention

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Prince George RCMP provide this photo of the type of activity they don't want to see happen this weekend.

For the fourth time in as many years, a Facebook event is being organized to get as many people as possible to float down the Nechako River in Prince George. Organizers Cody Gray and Ritchie Appiah say it's a great community event, but R.C.M.P. are targeting floaters who engage in unsafe or illegal behavior.

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Interviews:

Kitimat bar owners upset by Rio Tinto Alcan's plans to open pub at work camps

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Kitimat pub owners want camp workers to have to come to town to crack a cold one. (Toby Melville/Reuters)


Rio Tinto Alcan is Kitimat's largest employer. It has 2,500 workers, many from out of town. Now they are planning on opening a bar at their work camp-- a move which local pub owners say will hurt their bottom line.

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Interviews:

Prince George doctor shares stories from role as Team Canada's chief medical officer and SImon Whitfield's aunt

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Simon Whitfield won Olympic triathlon gold in 2000 and silver in 2008. Prince George's Dr. Janet Ames is his aunt has spent her own time inside the Olympic Village. (John Ulan/Canadian Press)

Dr. Janet Ames first experienced the Olympic Games when she picked up sweatsuits from track athletes in Montreal. She would later be the chief medical officer for Team Canada, and she just happens to be the aunt of this year's Team Canada flagbearer Simon Whitfield.

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Interviews:

Archaeology dig unearths hidden Haida history


Panorama of Gwayasdums Village. Photographed by George Dawson, 1885. Source: SFU.

Quentin Mackie is an anthropologist at the University of Victoria. He's delving into the history of Haida Gwaii, and his research is changing our understanding of Canada's original inhabitants.

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Interviews:

The tale of Lucy the Canada Goose


Part One:

When Diane VanderWiel rescued a little ball of fluff near her farm in Fort St James, she didn't know it would grow up to be a Canada Goose. But "Lucy," as she was named, was grateful for the care and chose to stick around the farm. Everything was fine until federal agents came to cart Lucy away. Here's our first conversation with Diana, from January 2012.

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Part Two:

When "Lucy", the Canada Goose was taken away from Diane VanderWiel's farm, it seemed like a hopeless case: federal rules don't allow for ownership of migratory birds. But Diane argued Lucy was free to come and go as she pleased, and mounted a campaign to get her back: a campaign that captured the attention of none less than Canada's Environment Minister.From January 2012.

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Part Three:

"Lucy" the Canada Goose became the subject of national attention in January 2012 when she was taken away from her home in Fort St James by conservation officers, only to be returned when Environment Minister Peter Kent got involved. In July 2012, Daybreak called Lucy's friend Diane VanderWiel to find out how Lucy was doing six months later.


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Show highlights for July 26

Show highlights from July 26:






Tomorrow on the show we check-in with Lucy the Canada Goose, get a behind-the-scenes look at the Games in London with a Prince George resident with strong connections to the Olympics, and discuss the safety of the Nechako River Float.

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Books, Interviews:

Beyond "Fifty Shades of Gray": Erotic literature book picks

Fifty Shades of Gray has long waiting lists at libraries everywhere. But our book panel has some alternative erotic reading for you to try out instead. Andrea Palmer and Erin Pfliger of the Prince George Public Library stopped by our studio for some salacious reading.

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Books discussed:

Enchanted: Erotic Bedtime Stories for Women by Nancy Madore

Three Kinds of Asking For It edited by Suzie Bright


The Happy Hooker: My Own Story by Xaviera Hollander

Little Birds by Anais Nin


Some Girls: My Life in a Harem by Gillian Lawrence 

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Trust Me On This
by Jennifer Cruisie

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Interviews:

Health effects of Dawson Creek wind park to be examined

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The Bear Mountain wind park near Dawson Creek. (photo by Andrew Kurjata)

Health Canada has announced it will be studying the health effects of wind turbines after complaints from people living near wind farms in Ontario. Now, one family near a wind park in Dawson Creek is raising its own concerns. Andrew Kurjata spoke with Garry Laveck who says that he supported the park when it was being built, but is now concerned about headaches, blood pressure changes and depression affecting him and his family.

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A spokesperson for AltaGas says they monitor sound levels and report to the B.C. government. A spokesperson for the B.C. government, on behalf of the Environmental Assessment Office (under the Ministry of Environment) told CBC:

  • "As part of the Environmental Assessment Office's approval of the Bear Mountain wind power project, the proponents were required to comply with specific noise standards."
  • "Last year, in response to noise complaints about the project, the provincial government retained a qualified expert to conduct a one-year sound study. Testing should be completed by October 2012, analysis and filtering of the results will take until December 2012."
Results of that study are slated to be released in January 2013.

 

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Enbridge, Interviews:

Christy Clark talks pipelines from Halifax

Christy Clark and Allison Redford
B.C. premier Christy Clark and Alberta premier Allison Redford are having an interprovincial spat over pipelines at the premiers meetings in Halifax. Clark took a break from the meetings to speak with Daybreak's Leisha Grebinski.

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Interviews:

Moose population declines by 50%, threatening tourism industries

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Tree cover is essential for moose to stay out of sight of predators and hunters. Clear cutting is being blamed for a major decline in moose populations around B.C. in recent years. (Photo submitted to CBC by Mona Ayer)

There has been a dramatic decline in the number of moose around northern British Columbia. This has big implications for industries built around the iconic animal.

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Enbridge, Interviews:

Albertan professor says B.C.-Alberta pipeline debate is "dialogue of the deaf"

University of Lethbridge political science chair Peter McCormick says that the premiers of British Columbia and Alberta are using their public debate on pipelines to gauge public opinion and try to gain favour. But is the relationship between the two provinces at risk? He spoke to Leisha Grebinski.

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Interviews:

Brian Skakun loses court appeal

On Tuesday, a Supreme Court Justice maintained a ruling from last year that found Prince George city councillor Brian Skakun guilty of breaching privacy laws when he leaked internal city documents to local media. It was a precedent setting case that received national attention and earned Skakun an award for whistleblowing. But it also caused him many sleepless nights. He spoke to Daybreak's Andrew Kurjata about the ruling.

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Previous stories:

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Interviews:

Clandestine Classics to add explicit content to famous novels

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The cover of the Clandestine Classic edition of Jane Eyre


The success of Fifty Shades of Gray has opened a new market for mainstream novels with sexual content. At least that's what Clandestine Classics seems to think. The publishing house is releasing five "enhanced" classic novels that add what they say are "missing scenes" to books like Pride and Prejudice, Sherlock Holmes and even Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.

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contests:

Show Us Your Summer Photo Contest

We want you to share your summer photos with us. Email them to daybreaknorth@cbc.ca so we can see what summer is like all across the north. To kick things off, here's some from the Daybreak team.

Leisha's friends look for grizzlies on the North Coast:

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An eagle soars over Kuhtzeymateen:

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Andrew's shot of the rising river in Prince George:
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A trip to the Ancient Cedar Forest:
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Here are our listener photos:
 
 

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Interviews:

Prince George woman creates guerilla gardens in vacant lots

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Laura Sandberg's guerilla garden in downtown Prince George. (CBC/Andrew Kurjata)

Laura Sandberg is a guerilla gardener in Prince George. She transforms vacant lots into vegetable and flower beds. She spoke with Daybreak's Marissa Harvey.

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Interviews:

Prince Rupert bomb shelter converted into art project

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Kate Jessup in front of her art project in a Prince Rupert bomb shelter (George Baker/CBC)


Seattle-based artist Kate Jessup is transforming a bomb shelter in Prince Rupert into an art project about the Northern Gateway pipeline.

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Interviews:

Can the B.C. Liberals use Northern Gateway pipeline to overtake NDP lead in next election?

Michael Byers is a political science professor at UBC. He thinks the B.C. Liberals are trying to position themselves as the economically and environmentally responsible party in the lead-up to the next provincial election, and are using the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline project as the way to do that. But he also doesn't think it will be enough for them to overtake the NDP.

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Interviews:

Beavers flooding small town in northern B.C.

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Beaver dams are flooding walking trails in Wells. That's caused the small town to debate the best way to deal with Canada's national symbol. Dave Jorgenson is with the Wells Trail Society.

(photo: "beaver crossing the road" by Leslie Main Johnson on Flickr)


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Interviews:

"Wrestling With Attitude" turns lens on female wrestling

Canada's Carol Huynh, right, is the reigning Pan Am, Commonwealth and Olympic champion in the 48-kg division.
Hazelton's Carol Huynh, right, took home gold at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. (Cris Bouroncle/AFP/Getty Images)

It wasn't until 1992 that female wrestling was allowed into the Olympic Games, and twenty years later it stills struggles for acceptance. Shelley Morten is a filmmaker whose turned her eye to that struggle-- and immersed herself in the experience in the process. She spoke with Leisha Grebinski.

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Interviews:

Bad breath expert shares top five foods to avoid at summer barbecues

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Summer's here, and that means many people are firing up the grill. But do all those grilled goods make you unpleasant to talk to? Harold Katz is the "final authority" on breath-- as founder of The California Breath Clinics and the author of The Bad Breath Bible. He tells us the top five foods to avoid this summer-- and be forewarned, garlic doesn't even make the list.

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Interviews:

Pigeons a major attraction at Dawson Creek motel

urban-pigeon-lg.jpgThe Northwinds Lodge motel in Dawson Creek has had some unusual guests checking in to its hotel: pigeons. And it turns out, they're great for business.


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The Playlist:

The Ultimate Canadian Hip-Hop Playlist

After Block Rocking Beats and Road Trip Songs we are turning our playlist-making attention to homegrown hip-hop. Long maligned, Canadian hip-hop stars now rule the world stage, from the sultry vocals of Drake to the world anthem lyrics of K'Naan to the underground cred of rappers like Cadence Weapon, Buck 65, and Shad. We want to celebrate the old and the new in a slew of Canuck rhymers, and if you have a pick call us at 1-866-340-1932, email daybreaknorth@cbc.ca or Tweet us @daybreaknorth.

To kick things off, here is a pioneer of the genre who also managed to be the first Canadian rapper to top U.S. charts: Kardinal Offishal and "Bakardi Slang."

  • Track 2: "Zombie Delight" by Buck 65
  • Track 3: "The Way It Should Be" by Plex feat. Wab Kinew and Sarah Podemski

  • Track 4: "My Definition of a Boombastic Jazz Style" by the Dream Warriors
  • Track 5: "Rhyme the World in 80 Days" by Kish
  • Track 6: "Check the OR" by Organized Rhyme



Track 7: "Crabbuckit" by K-OS
Track 8: "Northern Touch" by Rascals
Track 9: "I play my kazoo" by Grand Analog
Track 10: "Mr Metro" by Devon Martin
Track 11: "Take Care" by Drake



Track 12: "Black Hand" by Cadence Weapon
Track 13: "If this World were Mine" by Snow
Track 14: "Breathe" by Swollen Members
Track 15: "Drop the Needle" by Maestro Fresh Wes
Track 16: "Fire in Freetown" by K'naan
Track 17: "Ya I get it" by Shad



Track 18: "Don't Want To Be Your Slave" by Michie Mee
Track 19:  "Loonie" by Classified feat. Buck 65, D-Sisive, DL Incognito, and Shad

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Interviews:

Burns Lake: Six months after the explosion

 On January 20, 2012 the community of Burns Lake was devastated when a mill fire and explosion killed two, injured nearly two dozen, and shut down the community's main employer. Six months later reporter Wil Fundal returns.

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Enbridge, Interviews:

Union leader says Northern Gateway should be used to eliminate need for future pipelines

John Telford is the Canadian Director of the United Association of Plumbers, Pipefitters and Welders. He says his organization supports the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline project as a means to create jobs but, more importantly, as a way to make money to invest in future refining projects so no future export pipelines are needed.

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Interviews:

Prince George busker tries to heal difficult past through music

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If you've walked around downtown Prince George this summer, odds are you've encountered Marcel Wilson. Six days a week he strums his guitar at various downtown locations. His music comes from a place of healing. After losing his parents at an early age, he got trapped in addiction spent some time in jail. But his nephew introduced him to three guitar chords and, as he told Daybreak's Julia Kalinina, no matter how bad things get those chords help him get through his day. Listen to his story here.

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Interviews:

Do mosquitoes bite you because of your genetics?

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This microscopic portrait of a mosquito is one of the displays in a new exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, " Exploring Microspace." The mosquito is viewed through the scanning electron microscope. (AP PHOTO)

The reasons mosquitoes bite some people while leaving others alone has been the subject of many outdoor debates. But now scientists are working on a definitive answer. They include James Logan of the London School of Hygeine and Tropical Medicine. We called him up for some biting answers.


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Interviews:

"The Dark Knight Rises" review from Eli Glasner

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"The Dark Knight Rises", the third Batman film from Christopher Nolan, is bound to be a hit this summer. But does it stack up to Nolan's previous work? Eli Glasner gives us his take.


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Interviews:

Drop-in center for sex workers in Prince George facing closure

A safe haven for survival sex trade workers in Prince George is struggling to survive. The New Hope Society's main source of funding from the federal government ran out in September, and now it is only able to open one day a week, down from five. Daybreak's Marissa Harvey spoke with some of the women at New Hope Society about why this service is so important to them. She also spoke to the Society's single volunteer, Jan Wilson, about the challenges she is facing.

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Interviews:

Woman discovers husband kidnapped and attacked two women in family home

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"'She married a murderer, what kind of person is this?'" That's the question Shannon Moroney knows people were asking about her after she fell in love with Jason- a man who'd done hard time for murder. But Shannon and many others believed he was a success story-- someone who'd reformed his ways and deserved forgiveness. But as Shannon recounts in her new memoir "Through the Glass," a kidnapping and brutal attack in her family home would test the levels of her compassion. She spoke with Betsy Trumpener.

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Interviews:

Mother of missing Ohio filmmaker says son has a love of nature

Warren Sill of Ohio came to Northern BC to make a film about the "spirit bear" or Kermode bear. He hasn't been seen for over ten days. His mother, Claire Sill, speaks about her son's passion for nature and her longing to hug him again. RCMP Constable Leslie Smith provides an update on the search.

 

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Ohio filmmaker Warren Sill

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Interviews:

Aging fishermen key to rebuilding stock?

The Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development has written a new report titled "Rebuilding Fisheries: The Way Forward." In it, they lay out a number of ideas on how collapsed fishing stocks can be rebuilt worldwide. Andrew Kurjata spoke with the OECD's head of the Fisheries Policy Division about the report, Carlos-Christian Schmidt who laid out some details of the plan and explained why an ageing population presents an important opportunity. 

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Interviews:

Landslide risks in Northern BC

UNBC Geomorphologist Marten Geertsema says more and more landslides are happening in BC. He believes global warming is responsible. He discusses landslide risk in light of a massive landslide in Johnsons Landing last week, and a mud slide over the weekend near Fairmont Hot springs.

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Enbridge, Interviews:

Why the Northern Gateway pipeline is worth the risk, according to Neil Godbout

The proposed Northern Gateway pipeline would carry oil to tankers for export to the U.S. and Asia.

Is it worth the risk? That question is at the centre of the debate on the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline. Neil Godbout has taken a view he says was unpopular not just in the community he serves but in his newsroom by writing two editorials in support of the project. He joined Betsy Trumpener in studio to explain why.

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You can read Neil's editorials at the Prince George Citizen's website:

Part One: The math doesn't add up

Part Two: Pipeline worth the risk

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Interviews:

Prince Rupert residents want train whistles silenced

The Port of Prince Rupert continues to grow each month and that means more trains. In fact, CN expects the Prince Rupert route to grow so much it's building five new side tracks just to keep traffic moving. But not everyone is excited by the prospect. Brian Denton lives near a rail line in Prince Rupert. He joined us in studio to explain why he's asking for trains to quiet down.

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Interviews:

Terrace man launches course teaching spouses how to be friends

Dave Pollitt says the key to a good marriage is friendship. It may sound straightforward, but as he will attest, it's harder than it seems. We spoke to Pollitt about his methods, as well as a married couple on how they keep their friendship alive.

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Interviews:

RCMP "frustrated and helpless" as car in fiery, deadly Highway 16 crash burns for hours

A Prince George RCMP official says local Mounties felt "frustrated and helpless" as they watched a car that had been in a fiery, fatal crash burn on Highway 16 for more than six hours. The crash near Tabor Mountain, east of Prince George, killed a 21 year old man from Edmonton this week. Staff Sgt Pat McTiernan says the victim was removed from the car before his car was engulfed. But the coroner couldn't reach the scene.

And Highway 16 was closed to all motorists for hours as well.

McTiernan says NO fire fighters responded -- due to jurisdictional issues. And it's the second time this year that a vehicle in a fiery, fatal crash has been left to burn on a northern B.C. highway. In February, five people, including the Altizer family from Prince George, perished when their SUV hit a semi-truck at McLeese Lake.

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Interviews:

Daybreak Replay: The love of Kimiko Von Boetticher



photo: "Kimiko Tree" by Shari Bakes

In 2009, Kimiko Von Boetticher had lived on what was then the Queen Charlotte Islands for nine years. She was diagnosed with ovarian cancer and had been a pallative patient. For eight days, she could not eat and remained on bed rest. But she bounced back, and the day Robert Doane met her at the Trouthouse Bakery and Restaurant, she was about to marry her true love. Today, we dip into our archives for story about the emotional power of love, loss, and belonging.

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Kimiko passed away in 2010. She touched many people in her life. You can read tributes to her from painter Shari Bakes and the blog "Musings of a Furniture Maker."

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Interviews:

BC ice climber deals with drugs and despair

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Margo Talbot is an accomplished BC ice climber who once hit rock bottom. She struggled with drugs, booze, and dark despair. She dated a man with cartel connections. Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener interviews Margo Talbot about how she found redemption and her new memoir, "All that Glitters: A Climber's Journey through Addiction and Despair".

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Interviews:

Albertans paddle their canoe to Haida Gwaii!

Captain Ted Bentley and his crew of Alberta paddlers took just 8 hours to cross the daunting north coast Hecate Strait in a canoe!! The eight canoeists paddled their 29-foot boat to Haida Gwaii from Prince Rupert. It's a temperamental, often stormy strait.  And they made the trip just as quickly as a BC Ferry. Daybreak's Leisha Grebinski caught up with the canoe's captain in Montreal, after he'd just paddled the St. Lawrence river. 

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Interviews:

Northern BC town recalls catastrophic pipeline spill that fouled drinking water

As Enbridge's Kalamazoo oil spill makes headlines, a town in northeastern B.C. remembers the catastrophic 2000 Pembina Pipeline spill that fouled Chetwynd's drinking water. The equivalent of 500 bathtubs of crude oil spilled into the Pine River. Daybreak replays archival news reports of the recovery efforts. And we get an update from the man who was mayor during the spill,  who believes the river has never recovered.

Half of Canada's energy pipelines run through British Columbia.  That's 35,000 kilometres of pipelines.  Most transport gas.  But 3,000 kms of BC's pipelines - including the Pembina Pipeline that leaked a dozen years ago -- carry crude oil.

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Interviews:

Officials blame Enbridge for worst inland spill in US history

 American safety regulators are placing the blame for a 2010 Michigan oil spill squarely on Enbridge's shoulders. A US National Transportation Safety Board official says Enbridge handled the spill like "Keystone Kops." 

THE NTSB says the company committed 24 regulatory violations--including failure to fix corrosion problems over a 5 year period. The NTSB say crews in Enbridge's control center in Edmonton waited 17 hours after receiving initial alarms before closing valves to isolate the damaged section of pipe.

Over 800-thousand gallons of oil sands crude spilled into the Kalamazoo river.

It was the worst inland oil spill in U-S history, and cost almost a billion dollars to clean up.

Daybreak North heard first from NTSB chair Deborah Hirshman.

Then we spoke with CBC reporter John Northcott in Washington D.C.

 

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Interviews:

B.C.'s Environment Minister surveys tsunami debris on Haida Gwaii

Two weeks after Daybreak North's George Baker travelled to Haida Gwaii and filed a CBC series, Tsunami Drift, B.C. Environment Minister Terry Lake travels to Haida Gwaii to survey the tsunami damage for himself. Minister Lake describes what he's seeing washed up on the province's Pacific shores to Daybreak North's Leisha Grebinski.
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Extra:

Quesnel fears loss of hundreds of mill jobs

Quesnel fears the loss of hundreds of mill jobs, amidst a timber supply crunch in British Columbia that was caused in part by the pine beetle infestation. Nearly 2,000 people are currently employed by the forest industry in Quesnel, and many more rely on money from local mills for their livelihood. More than 50 government officials, First Nations leaders, mill owners, foresters, environmentalists and citizens gathered in Quesnel to share their fears for the future with B.C.'s timber supply committee.
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Interviews:

Can the inner-city Hudson's Bay Slough be a natural showcase for Prince George?

The Hudson's Bay Slough near downtown Prince George is a haven for birds and other wildlife, but it's also a prime location for dumping trash and other undesirable activity.Now, the Prince George Naturalist Club is thinking about turning the inner-city slough into a showcase for nature in the city. Club chair Clive Keen visited our studio to explain.

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Interviews:

WorkSafe B.C. knew about dust risks before mill explosions

It is not yet known what caused the deadly mill explosions in Burns Lake and Prince George, but speculation is high that dangerous levels of wood dust may have played a part. It has now been revealed that WorkSafe had issued warnings about dust as early as 2009. Bruce Clarke is the regional manager of WorkSafe in Prince George, he explained what the organization knew before the explosions happened.

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Interviews:

Hundreds of pilgrims in Fraser Lake to honour Rose Prince

Every year, hundreds of First Nations and Catholics from around the world visit Fraser Lake in honour of Rose Prince. They attribute the Carrier First Nation woman with miracles, and believe she should be made a saint. This documentary first aired on the Current in 2008.

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Daybreak Shuffle, Interviews:

Raghu Lokanathan shares the secrets of campfire songs

Raghu Lokanathan is a favourite of folkfests and sing-a-longs across B.C. and the province. He dropped by our Prince George studio to teach our listeners the secret to a great campfire strumming song.

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Find Raghu at raghumusic.com.

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Interviews:

Quesnel man calculates new geographic centre of British Columbia

For years, Vanderhoof has billed itself as "The Heart of It All," thanks to its claim-to-fame as the geographic centre of British Columbia. But Quesnel resident Bob Merta has done his own calculations, and he says the centre of the province isn't Vanderhoof-- but instead places it at a lake near Granisle. We spoke to Bob, as well as the mayors of Vanderhoof and Granisle for their reaction to the news.

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Bob's calculations can be seen in this spreadsheet.


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Interviews:

Timber supply crunch - Daybreak speaks to COFI president John Allen

This Friday, BC's special "timber supply committee" wraps up its final public consultations in northern BC.

The committee's trying to figure out how to save mill jobs and it's considering new measures such as logging protected areas.

Its final report on timber supply is due on August 15th.

John Allen, the president of the Council of Forest Industries, spoke to Daybreak North about how the timber supply issue is being addressed.

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Cornering Gas:

Human health impacts from the energy industry in northeast B.C.

Could northeastern British Columbia's gas development be hazardous to local people's health?  The BC government has launched a health study to find out.  Now, a new peer-reviewed study says the energy industry may be linked to cases of cancer, asthma and respiratory diseases in the Peace. Daybreak spoke with the study's author, environmental scientist Judi Krzyzanowski. She's been studying the issue for years. Her work has been published in the National Research Council's Environmental Review. Here's the research abstract: http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/a2012-005

 

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Interviews:

Mackenzie-born novelist captures South Asian family struggles

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Northern-born novelist Raminder Sidhu

 

Raminder Sidhu's novel, "Tears of Mehndi" captures the family struggles of southeast Asians in British Columbia, and tells the stories of women caught between tradition and western culture. Sidhu was born and raised in Mackenzie, BC. She tells Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener about a conversation in the temple -- that prompted her to write her first book.

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Interviews:

US outdoor magazine looks at the disappearances on Highway 16

Bob Friel, a journalist for US-based Outdoor Magazine recently went on a ride down the Highway of Tears to gather stories about the women who disappearanced along the highway over the last two decades.

He spoke to Daybreak North about what he saw.

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Interviews:

Growing produce year-round in Fort St. John

Karen Mason-Bennett is putting shipping containers to a new use. She's using them to create greenhouses to help Fort St. John produce some of its own vegetables year-round.

She's with the Northern Environmental Action Team in Fort St. John and she joined Daybreak North live to speak about her project.

 

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