host picture

September 2011 Archives

Bookmark and Share

contests:

Northern Exposure

WOW.

We asked, and you responded.

Over the last two weeks, we have received many fantastic entries in the Northern Exposure Photo Contest.

We wish we could put up all of them, but in the end only three will be chosen for display on our walls.

However, we would like to thank everyone who took the time to enter, and know that we enjoyed each and every one of these, as well as the stories that go along with them. Northern British Columbia is full of great people and places.

If you're in Prince George tomorrow, be sure to come out to our Open House to help choose a People's Choice Award.

Meanwhile, take the time to click through and see what northern B.C. has to offer.

Bookmark and Share

Cornering Gas:

Cornering Gas: Friday

Cornering Gas continues with the light and the heavy.

Daybreak strolls the aisle at a tiny Fort Nelson store that gives "one stop shopping" a whole new meaning.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Fracking is a thirsty business. Fracking just one shale gas well can use as much 600 Olympic-size swimming pools of water. That's a big problem for drought-prone Dawson Creek. So the northern city is freeing up "frack water" by putting its sewage up for sale.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Christy Clark may have thrown her backing behind shale gas fracking... But not everyone is sold on the rapid development.

 

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Prince George councillor wants more municipal transparency

Do you have a right to know what goes on in city hall? Is there some information that the pubic shouldn't know? Freedom of information may be not make headlines, but it has big implications on our governments and what you are- or aren't- allowed to know about them.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

One last cruise ship sails away

Prince Rupert's time is up as a cruise ship destination -- temporarily, at least.
The City of Rainbows has lost its last weekly cruise ship visitor. Daybreak's Carolina de Ryk asks Prince Rupert Port Authority sales and marketing vice president Shaun Stevenson what's next for the city's cruise dock.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


DSC_0802.jpg
Carver Jason Watts works in a carving studio overlooking the Northland Terminal Dock in Prince Rupert.(photo George Baker/CBC)


Bookmark and Share

Cornering Gas:

Cornering Gas: Thursday

Water, Earthquakes and growing towns -- oh my!

First, Daybreak's Cornering Gas team Robert Doane and Betsy Trumpener hear from northeast residents who are concerned about the water use in the region's Oil and Gas industry.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Next, it's Town and Fracking. Fort Nelson is booming and that's changing the local landscape.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Finally,

Could a RUMBLIN' in the horn river be man-made? As international companies descend upon the world class gas play, there seems to be a whole lotta shaking goin on.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Cornering Gas:

Cornering Gas: Wednesday

 
 

There's not a bust in sight. Thanks to the development of shale gas plays in northeastern B.C., there's likely enough gas to for a century. That's according to Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers

Download Flash Player to view this content.

They moved to Canada to enjoy the quiet life. Now a German couple say their quiet life is being drowned out by gas activity.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

farmers.jpg

"Fracking" for shale gas is a booming, multi-billion dollar business in B.C. Energy companies are blasting water and chemicals deep underground -- to release natural gas -- from shale rocks. The boom has created thousands of jobs -- for Canadian workers. But some local people believe -- that gas drilling on their doorsteps -- is slowly killing them.

Download Flash Player to view this content.
 

Charl Badenhorst (for web).jpg

Charl Badenhorst with Northern Health

Some people living amidst northern B.C.'s gas wells, plants, and pipelines -- are raising serious concerns -- about their health. They're demanding the B.C. government step in -- to ensure their safety. Charl Badenhorst backs that call - for health surveillance and tracking -- of people exposed to gas and chemicals.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Cornering Gas:

Cornering Gas, day two: One heck of a commute

All this week, we are running a special series called "Cornering Gas" on Daybreak North. It takes an in-depth look at the shale gas industry and how it's affecting northeastern B.C. and beyond. Daybreak North co-host Robert Doane and CBC news reporter Betsy Trumpener hit the road to meet the people and places at the centre of the controversial industry.



B.C.'s longest commute?


By plane, bus, or helicopter, Fort Nelson's gas field workers have one heck of a commute. Today, we met some of those workers.

Transient mother

Most of the workers in Fort Nelson's Horn River area fly in from across B.C. or even Alberta. They'll spend two weeks in camps and then go home. Betsy Trumpener met one woman at the airport for her perspective.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


The long and winding road


The Sierra Yoyo Desan is one of British Columbia's busiest resource roads. But for Lecricia Behn-Adin, navigating the white-knuckle ride is all in a day's work. She took Robert Doane along for the ride.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Meet the gas field workers

It's estimated that thousands of transient workers commute by plane and helicopter to the Fort Nelson region. Betsy Trumpener met just a few of them.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Residents ask for road upgrades

Even though the Sierra Yoyo Desan road is the main artery to Fort Nelson's oil and gas industry, it's still gravel and full of potholes. Following a recent fatality, there have been calls for upgrades. Daybreak met with Jim Leavitt, area manager for central interior first aid. He saw the accident's after-effects firsthand.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Cornering Gas:

Cornering Gas, a special series on the shale gas industry, launches today

CBC vehicle in Fort Nelson.JPG

Starting today, Daybreak North is launching a new series. "Cornering Gas" takes an in-depth look at the shale gas industry and how it's affecting northeastern B.C. and beyond. Daybreak North co-host Robert Doane and CBC news reporter Betsy Trumpener hit the road to meet the people and places at the centre of the controversial industry.

Introduction:

To kick things off, Betsy and Robert sat down with Carolina De Ryk for an overview of what they saw and a preview of what's coming up.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Cleaning up, overall:

The gas boom of the northeast is creating a business boom for Gerald Wagger. Robert spoke to him in Dawson Creek.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Gerald Wagger runs Cinta Cleaning and Delivery Service.

No room at the inn... or the hotel, or the motel, or...

The oil and gas industry is also good for the hospitality business. But it's not so good if you're trying to find a room anywhere in the Peace.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Dawn Wilton is manager at the Aurora Park Inn and Suites in Dawson Creek.


MLA predicts population will triple

Pat Pimm is the MLA for the North Peace. He predicts the industry boom could see Fort Nelson tripling in size.


Download Flash Player to view this content.


[photo: The Daybreak North vehicle in Fort Nelson. Credit Betsy Trumpener]



Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Northern Medical Program responds to questions

Previously on Daybreak North, we heard questions over whether the Northern Medical Program was succeeding in bringing doctors to northern British Columbia. To respond, we spoke with Dr. David Snadden, Vice Provost of Medicine at UNBC and the Regional Associate Dean for Northern British Columbia with UBC.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


You can see more on this story, including video clips and a response from the provincial government, at CBC.ca.


Bookmark and Share

Daybreak Shuffle:

Jesse Dee and Jacquie B on the Daybreak Shuffle

Ghost Cover Photo-02.jpg

















Many musicians head for the big city to make it big. But for Jesse Dee and Jacquie B making a living is more important, and they've found northern British Columbia is just the place to do it.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


You learn more about the band, including their upcoming tour, at jesseandjacquie.com.





Bookmark and Share

Prince George students celebrate Day of Peace

Wednesday was the International Day of Peace. To celebrate, one Prince George classroom reached out across the continent. Daybreak's Jenifer Norwell was there.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

contests:

Northern Exposure Photo Contest

As part of CBC's 75th anniversary celebrations, we want to bring northern B.C. to Daybreak North. To help, we're launching the Northern Exposure Photo Contest.

Send us photos that showcase your northern British Columbia, whether they're from your backyard, your community, or your adventures in the wilderness. We'll be showcasing the photos on our website and displaying a selection in our CBC Prince George office.

To enter, send your photos to daybreaknorth@cbc.ca, subject line "Northern Exposure Photo Contest".

You must include in your entry your full name, your email address, your mailing address, your phone number, some information about the photo (title, location, etc) as well as acknowledgment that you have read and agreed to the rules and regulations as displayed below.

Failure to include this information will disqualify you from entrance into this contest.

Entries are limited to one per person per day, to a maximum of five entries.

Winning photos will be judged based on a mixture of artistic merit and representation of northern British Columbia.

Rules and Regulations

Click here to view in a new window, or to print.

Northern Exposure Photo Contest

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Fort St. John is suffering from lack of amublances

Fort St. John's first responders are coming in last when it comes to paramedics. Due to short staffing at B-C Ambulance Service, fire fighters are picking up the slack. That's downloaded costs and responsibility onto the city.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

UNBC gets accepted into Canada West

If at first you don't succed, try -- and try -- and try and try again. The University of Northern BC is now part of the Canada West Universities Association. It has been trying to be part of the national league since 2008. Yesterday it got word-- UNBC was in. That means its athletes can now compete with other national teams. But are its basketball and soccer players ready for that?

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Northern school doesn't mean northern doctors

Seven years, 100 million dollars and five family practice doctors. Those are some of the numbers coming out of BC's ambitious northern medical program. Launched in 2004, the program runs on the idea that if doctors train in the north, they're more likely to stay here. And since the second class of doctors graduated in May this year, CBC wanted to find out if the program was getting positive results.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

LNG to amp up northwest

The province aims to ramp up efforts to get BC gas to asian markets. Yesterday, premier Christy Clark announced her government will step up efforts to open a liquified natural gas plant in Kitimat by 2015. It is all part of the premier's job-creation program for British Columbians. But as it turns out, it will take more than jobs to export LNG. It takes a lot of energy to export energy.

 

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

More money announced for Northwest

$15-million dollars for the Port of Prince Rupert. 570 construction jobs for both the port and the expansion of the CN rail line. And 4-thousand operational positions after construction.

 

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Prince George biker jumps train

When it comes to mountain biking, Kyle Norbraten is no slouch. The Prince George-born rider came back to the northern city this summer. And he filmed a trick he's been dreaming of his whole career. Daybreak's Jenifer Norwell spoke with him about his epic stunt.

From The Inside Out - The PG Train Gap from SecondBase Films on Vimeo.

 

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Add category, Interviews:

Rodney Jackson Inquest Coverage

Homicide. That is the ruling, following an inquest into the shooting death of Rodney Jackson. After five days of deliberation, the 5-person inquest jury rendered its verdict, along with 13 recommendations. David Eby is with the BC Civil Liberties Association.

 

Download Flash Player to view this content.

RCMP jackson.jpg

RCMP Cpl Don Wrigglesworth says he feared for his officers safety and called in the Emergency Response Team to arrest Rodney Jackson.  Photo credit: Betsy Trumpener

We also spoke with Grand Chief Stewart Phillip and Cameron Ward, the family`s lawyer

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Missing Women Commission of Inquiry coverage on Daybreak North



We have been providing ongoing coverage of the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry. It was in northern B.C. hearing from those affected, and reporter Betsy Trumpener was there with it. On Monday, she spoke with Robert Doane about what she was expecting to see.

We also heard from the mother of woman who's still grieving over her daughter's death near Fort Nelson.

Fort Nelson RCMP have renewed their plea for tips to help solve the murder of Loretta Capot-Blanc, from 1997.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


On Tuesday, we heard from Vicky Hill, whose mother went missing in the 1970s. We also spoke to Marlene Swift, the program manager for the RCMP-based North Coast Victim Services.

Download Flash Player to view this content.
 

On Wednesday, we heard from Deborah Good. She spoke in Gitanayow about two women she knew, Alberta Williams and Lana Derrick, one of whom was murdered, the other missing.

Download Flash Player to view this content.
 

On Thursday, we heard more of the voices collected by Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener on the road in Kitsumkalum and Gitanytow.

Download Flash Player to view this content.
 

As the inquiry wrapped up its northern leg, we spoke with Art Vertilieb. He's the senior commission counsel.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


 

RCMP Supt Paul Richards heads aboriginal policing for E Division. photo Credit: Betsy Trumpener/CBC News

 

For six years, E-Panna's 60 officers have been investigating the "Highway of Tears" cases.
 But still -- there are no charges and no arrests.
 And Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener wanted to know why.
 She interviewed RCMP Supt Paul Richards -- in a school hallway in Gitanyow, just after a Missing Woman's hearing there last week

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Some First Nation leaders are asking why they were NOT included in the Missing Women's Commission on it's tour of the north.
 Last week the families of missing and murdered women along the so-called Highway of Tears spoke out.
 The Commission of Inquiry held forums in Prince Rupert, near Terrace, in Gitanyow, and the Hazeltons
 But some further down highway 16 are wondering why THEIR voices were not heard.
 Wilf Adams is Chief of Lake Babine.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Lawyer assaulted in downtown Prince George

li-bc-110916-lawyer-courthouse-punch.jpg

On Thursday morning, a crown lawyer was assaulted outside Prince George's courthouse. Daybreak North's Betsy Trumpener was on the scene shortly after the attack. She spoke with Prince George RCMP's Leslie Smith.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


You can read more on this story and see video at CBCNews.ca.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

No charges in tasering of 11-year-old in Prince George

The West Vancouver Police Department's investigation into the tasering of an 11-year-old by RCMP in Prince George has ended. They recommended that no charges be laid. We collected information from that report, as well as reaction from B.C. Civil Liberties and B.C.'s Representative for Children and Youth.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Below is coverage on this story from CBC Television.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Gaming grant review comes to northern B.C.

Prince George turns out for Sept. 15 community forum

British Columbians have been speaking out about how gaming grants should be given out to the non-profit sector. Daybreak North's Jenifer Norwell went to a public forum in Prince George to speak to those affected, as well as gaming grant review chair Skip Triplett.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


A report on gaming grants is to be submitted to the province on October 31.

(photo courtesy BC Government Flickr stream)

Bookmark and Share

Downtown Business Improvement Association president excited about wood centre

Wood Innovation Centre will create jobs for generations

Premier Christy Clark announced that the long-awaited Wood Innovation and Design Centre will be going into the PG Hotel site. This exciting news for Hugh Nicholson, president of the Prince George Downtown Business Improvement Association.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


(photo courtesy BC Government Flickr stream)

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

MLA, Uncle speak out about dead First Nations man



All this week, an inquest into the death of Rodney Shane Jackson has been taking place in Terrace. Jackson was fatally shot during an incident with the RCMP's Emergency Response Team in a remote area north of Hazelton. We spoke to his uncle, Aubrey Jackson, and MLA for Stikine, Doug Donaldson.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Aubrey Jackson also painted a portrait of his nephew as a man struggling for cultural sovereignty. Here he speaks with CBC reporter Betsy Trumpener.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


You can hear Betsy Trumpener's earlier report on this inquest below.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Deer causing problems in Haida Gwaii

On Haida Gwaii, deer are being tagged with GPS collars as part of a project called Project BAMBI. Daybreak spoke with coordinator Barbara Roswell to find out why.


Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Toad River resident collects premiers' signatures on dollar bill

Earl Brown lives in the community of Toad River, north of Fort Nelson, where he has a unique piece of currency: a dollar bill decorated with the signatures of every premier from W.A.C Bennet onwards. Daybreak North's Andrew Kurjata called him up to find out how he got so much political capital.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


We are hoping for a photo of the dollar bill that we can share with you.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Smithers mayor thinks RCMP cost too much

Cress Farrow is the mayor of Smithers. He says that the price of RCMP in his community and others around the province is too high- and he's looking for alternatives.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


The province of British Columbia is currently negotiating a new contract with the RCMP for when the current one expires in March 2012.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Tree's disappearance has significant effects on ecosystem

aclason_profile_pic.jpg



















Alana Clason is a Phd student at UNBC who's just been awarded a fellowship for her research into the Whitebark Pine. While that's good news for her, what she's finding is bad news for the northern ecosystem.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


You can learn more about Clason's reaserch on UNBC's website.

(photo of Alana Clason courtesy UNBC)





Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Fort Nelson residents want to unban pitbulls

A ban on pitbulls has been in Fort Nelson since 1996. But now, over 600 residents are asking for a change. Robert Doane spoke with pitbull owners Lori Kasack and Vicki Fox.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

News from northern B.C.

There has been plenty of news in Prince George and northern B.C. today. Here's a preview of what will be on our show tomorrow:

  • BC Crown Prosecutor attacked outside Prince George court (CBC News story)
  • Mounties who used taser on 11-year-old boy in Prince George not facing charges (CBC News story)
  • Continuing coverage of the Rodney Jackson shooting inquest (previous Daybreak North story)
  • Missing Women Commission of Inquiry's northern B.C. wrap-up
  • Reaction to the premier's announcement on the Wood Innovation and Design Centre (Daybreak North interview with Clark)
  • Plus, gaming grant reviews, the latest on Highway 37-A in Stewart, and the winners of our animal story contest!
That and more on Daybreak North tomorrow morning starting at 6 am Pacific Time.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Premier Christy Clark in Prince George, announces Wood Innovation and Design Centre Downtown

Premier Christy Clark was in Prince George on Thursday for the opening of the Council of Forest Industries Convention. She announced that the long-awaited Wood Innovation and Design Centre will be being built at the old PG Hotel site on George Street. But before she made that announcement, she spoke to Daybreak North host Robert Doane about forestry and the north.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


You can read the Premier's announcement on the BC Government website. Daybreak will continue to have stories on this subject in the coming week.

Bookmark and Share

Internet feed error

We apologize for the technical difficulties we are currently experiencing. Internet listeners may find that they are receiving the CBC feed from Whitehorse rather than Prince George. We wanted to let you know that we are aware of the situation and working on it as quickly as we can. Meanwhile, we will be posting all of our top stories to this website so you don't have to miss us too much.

Again, we apologize for the error and appreciate your loyalty!

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Amber Alert for missing women?

In the wake of Kienan Hebert's return, some are calling for another Amber-style alert. At the Missing Women Commission of Inquiry there were calls for an Aboriginal alert. Robert Doane spoke with associate professor of criminal justice Timothy Griffin to find out whether such a system could work.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

New website helps find local food in northern B.C.

Community Futures in Prince George has developed a new website to help people in northern B.C. find food being grown in their communities. And what you can get just might surprise you. Daybreak North associate producer Andrew Kurjata spoke to Jillian Merrick about the site.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


To see what you can find, visit beyondthemarket.ca.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Rodney Shane Jackson shooting inquest in Terrace



On Monday, an inquest into a fatal shooting began in Terrace, B.C. 35-year-old Rodney Shane Jackson was shot during an incident with the RCMP's "emergency response team", near Hazelton, two years ago. Daybreak North report Betsy Trumpener was there for the first day of the inquest, and she spoke with Daybreak North host Robert Doane about the case.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


You can read more about this story at cbc.ca/news.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

DFO scraps funding to Pacific north coast ocean management plan process

B.C.'s north coast has no formal ocean management plan, despite being used by hundreds of people and thousands of species. The Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area (PNCIMA) plan was supposed to address this issue by bringing together key players in fishing, transport, and other areas.

Late last week, the federal government announced it would be scrapping its funding for the program. That decision did not impress Des Nobels. He's a Prince Rupert representative for fishing advocacy group T. Buck Suzuki, and in this clip he speaks to Daybreak North associate producer George Baker.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Susan Farlinger is the Pacific Regional Director for the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. She spoke with host Carolina De Ryk.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Meanwhile, The Marine Advisory Committee of Haida Gwaii hopes to provide an ocean management strategy for the Pacific North Coast. Carolina de Ryk spoke with Russ Jones, project manager for the Haida Gwaii Marine Planning Initiative and hereditary chief from Skidegate.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Municipal Auditor General plan worries long-time municipal employee; adjunct professor

Premier Christy Clark's plans for a Municipal Auditor General have attracted some debate. Among those against the idea is Alberto de Feo. He has worked in municipal government for over two decades and is currently an adjunct professor at UNBC and chief administrative officer of the District of Lakes Country.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


You can read de Feo's blog post on the subject at alby59.wordpress.com.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Missing Women Commission Inquiry in northern B.C.

missing women totem.jpg


All this week, the Missing Women Commission Inquiry travels the so-called "Highway of Tears," In gatherings from Prince Rupert to Smithers, Commissioner Wally Opal hopes to hear from the families of missing and murdered women. Daybreak's Betsy Trumpener will be listening closely, as well. Our CBC news reporter is following the commission's path. She spoke to Daybreak host Robert Doane.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Here is the schedule for the hearings.

  • Sept. 12, 1 to 5 p.m., Northwest Community College Prince Rupert.
  • Sept. 13, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Kitsumkalum Hall, Terrace.
  • Sept. 13, 3 to 5 p.m., Gitanyow Independent School, Kitwanga.
  • Sept. 13, 7:30 to 9 p.m., Nisga'a Community Room, Terrace.
  • Sept. 14, 1 to 4 p.m., Moricetown Multiplex, Smithers.
  • Sept. 14, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., 3955 3rd Avenue, Smithers.
  • Sept. 15, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., Gitanmaax Hall, Hazelton.
(photo: A weeping woman on a totem pole in the small First Nations community of Kispiox, north of the "highway of Tears." Credit: Betsy Trumpener, CBC News)

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Nation Education: Examining Aboriginal Education in British Columbia

For back to school, Daybreak North ran a special series on Aboriginal education called "Nation Education." Here are all the segments from that series:

Part 1:

Half of all aboriginal students won't graduate in B.C. But who's to blame: the student, the teacher, the parent or the system? For an answer, we get two different opinions. Paul Michel is director of First Nations studies at UNBC and a former principal of a First Nations independent school, and Peter Cowley is director of school performance studies at the Fraser Institute, and helps to author the Aboriginal Student report card.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Download Flash Player to view this content.



Part 2:

Katie Hyslop is the Tyee Solutions Society's Education Reporter, and for part two of our series she told us about how Chief Atahm Immersion School on the Adams Lake reserve is  putting Aboriginal culture and language first.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Part 3:
 
In Haida Gwaii, 75% of the students are Haida, but the curriculum only allows 10% local content. As we hear in this clip, Haida councils want more.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Part 4:

For the conclusion of our series, we reached out to those most affected by Aboriginal education issues: Aboriginal youth. Host Robert Doane speaks with three past and present students about their educational experience in northern B.C.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

CBC news reporter remembers 9/11 in New York

Many people remember where they were on september 9, 2001. That holds especially true for Daybreak North's news reader Pamela McCall. She was among the first to cover the event from ground zero in New York. She joined Daybreak North host Robert Doane to share her story.


Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Tim Horton's coming to Kitimat

Tim Horton's is a Canadian icon, but coffee lovers in Kitimat have had to drive as far as Terrace to get a double-double. That is, until the community's mayor and council reached out to the popular franchise.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Vanderhoof band goes from punk to folk

Vanderhoof may be the geographical center of the province But that doesn't necessarily mean it's the cultural center. That hasn't stopped the band Rosewood's Diary, though. They've already released one album, and last week they had debuted their second at a local theater.


Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Northern NHL'er saves teen

Dennis Robertson's life is changing in many ways. The Fort St. John product became a Toronto Maple Leafs draft pick in June. But the Brown University defenceman is becoming more famous as a hero -- picture Aquaman in skates. Robertson recently saved the life of an 14-year old boy at a Rhode Island beach.


Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

UNBC celebrates 20 years as an a school

UNBC is marking a milestone. This is the twentieth year of operation for the northern university. Since it first opened it's doors, the school has expanded to over 4,000 students in four campuses.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Heavy rains hit the northwest

DSC_0694.jpg

It's raining on the north coast and there's more rain in the forecast. Daybreak's George Baker headed to streets of Prince Rupert seeking the sun behind the gushing clouds.

 

Download Flash Player to view this content.

The rains have had impact outside Prince Rupert. Several communities in the Northwest are cut off this morning due to flooding and mudslides. Heavy rain overnight has pummelled the town of Stewart -- and there's more in the forecast. We got updates from two of the communities cut off by the rain

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Transient workers take dollars out of the north

Transient workers are digging in, and extracting big bucks OUT of BC's economy. Hoards of men and women are flown in, and bussed to remote camps. Few ever step foot into local BC communities.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Northern Health reacts to shortage of maternity services in the north

It's tough enough to have a baby. But imagine being forced to deliver your child outside your home community. That's what many northern mothers have to do.

 

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Teachers take job action as schools reopen

Prince George school board chair Lynn Hall discusses with Carolina de Ryk what lies ahead for the 2011-12 school year -- a year that begins with work action by teachers.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Salt marshes get a scientific look from UNBC students

The salt marshes are some of the most beautiful parts of the north coast, But very little is known about their dynamic ecosystems. One U-N-B-C professor is trying to change that. At the end of August, Darwyn Coxson and a team of 16 students did a rapid assessment of the area.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Family ups reward for missing Vanderhoof woman

Madison Scott is still missing. And her family wants to find her more than ever. They've just upped the reward for information leading to breaks in the case to 25 thousand dollars. But even with the increase payout, police have made little progress in the case.
Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Hot water could be a new source of energy in the Robson Valley

It's water, not oil that Craig Dunn wants to drill for in the Robson Valley. His company -- Borealis Geopower -- is working with the Village of Valemount and local First Nations. The plan is to drill down to the super-heated water the bubbles up near Valemount and convert that heat into energy.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Open season on wolves being called into question

Are wolves getting a bad rap in B-C's Central Interior? The provincial government is calling for an open season on the four-legged predator in the region. The decision is based on the threat of more wolves eating more cattle in the Cariboo.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Rangers could be practicing at a Prince George school

Prince George is about to get its first military reserve in four decades. The Rocky Mountain Rangers are coming back to the city and they feel that the old Meadow Elementary School site is the perfect place to set up camp.

 

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Antique buggy for sale in Prince George

buggy.jpg
This antique buggy is for sale in Prince George. (photo by Andrew Kurjata)


If the price of gas is too high, perhaps we can interest you in a horse-drawn buggy? Prince George entrepreneur Alfred Seidl has one up for sale, and if you can find the right price he has some business ideas for you, too.

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Interviews:

Daybreak North: live from Fort Nelson

CBC vehicle in Fort Nelson.JPG
The CBC vehicle on the road near Fort Nelson.



Daybreak North host Robert Doane and reporter Betsy Trumpener hit the road this week. They made their way up to Fort Nelson, where they broadcast live from the Down to Earth Health Shop. Below are some of the segments from that show.

Welcome to Fort Nelson

In this clip, Carolina De Ryk speaks to Robert Doane about his trip so far. We also hear from Kym Gillett, owner of the Down to Earth Health Shop.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Fort Nelson's new recreation centre

Two years ago, Fort Nelson's recreation centre collapsed under the weight of snow. Now, a new centre has opened in its place. Daybreak North host Robert Doane spoke with Danielle Morine, recreation program manager with the Northern Rockies Regional Municipality, about how the project came to life.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


How to boom without busting

Fort Nelson may be in the middle of an oil and gas boom, but how do you make sure it doesn't go bust? Daybreak North host Robert Doane spoke to Fort Nelson mayor Bill Streeper about how he's working to ensure the community's long-term survival.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Fiddler brings Metis background to his music

Eric Ashdown's life has been dedicated to two life-long passions. He spent more than 40 years in the oil and gas business. Now retired, he spends most of his days crafting music. Daybreak North host Robert Doane spoke to Ashdown in Fort Nelson.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Fort Nelson's transient workers not spending money locally

While the natural gas industry is bringing plenty of work to Fort Nelson, it's not necessarily bringing new spending. The industry has many transient workers who don't part with their money in the community. David Milner is the president of the community's chamber of commerce. He spoke with Daybreak North host Robert Doane about his strategy to change that trend.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Doctor shortage nothing new for Fort Nelson mothers

Fort Nelson may be booming, but it still faces the same challenges as many rural communities. That includes finding a doctor. Kate Everett-Hayner is ready to give birth to her third child. Due to ongoing doctor shortages, she has to do so in Kamloops.

 

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Contract negotiations with B.C. teachers continue

As students gear up to go back to school, we've been following the contract negotiations between B.C. teachers and the government.

George Abbott is the Education Minister. At a news conference this Tuesday, he said while both sides were working hard, he was not optimistic. In this clip, he says: "If there is any reason for optimism it has not been shared with me."

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Susan Lambert is the president of the B.C. Teachers' Federation. She explains what students and parents can expect if a strike does indeed go forward.

 

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

Brian Skakun's court case being used as warning to Vancouver city councillors

Prince George city councillor Brian Skakun has been found guilty of breaking privacy rules. As he appeals that decision, Prince George city council has decided to delay imposing sanctions on him. Meanwhile, the court case is being cited by lawyers in Vancouver's city hall--and has contributed to a debate about freedom of information.


Download Flash Player to view this content.

Bookmark and Share

UNBC campers learn how to be good to the environment

Going green is a little bit easier thanks to UNBC. As Daybreak North's Jenifer Norwell learned, you're never too young to be good to nature.


Download Flash Player to view this content.