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Daybreak North
with Carolina de Ryk
and Russell Bowers

Northern B.C.'s Number One Radio Show

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Listen live, weekdays from 6:00 to 8:37

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91.5 FM Prince George 
860 AM Prince Rupert 
88.3 FM Fort St John 



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School District 57 All Candidates Forum

An all-candidates forum for the people running for trustees in School District 57 representing Prince George and area. Co-sponsored by the Prince George Citizen, the College of New Caledonia, and CBC Radio. Recorded live at the College of New Caledonia Room Room 1-306.

Note: we muted the mic during the breaks. We will be editing those parts out in the coming days.
 

Why school boards matter... even if you don't have kids

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On-air Port Edward mayoral candidates debate

Our election coverage continues across the north and this time we made room for the mayoral candidates of Port Edward face off on the show.

Current Port Edward Mayor Dave McDonald and mayoral candidate Alice Kruta square off on the topics of the day. Here's where they each stand on LNG terminal construction, housing in Port Edward, making a place for people of varied income levels, making the city livable for seniors and what their visions are for the city.

We're curious to know what your reaction is to the candidates' answers. Please comment and weigh in.

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Science World tours the province to talk LNG

Daybreak North Host Carolina de Ryk talks to Science World CEO Bryan Tisdall about why the science centre is taking liquefied natural gas on a B.C. tour.

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Should the rural community of Thornhill be absorbed by Terrace?

Terrace's outgoing mayor Dave Pernarowski would love to see his city annex Thornhill. The rural community sits across the street from Terrace. But the community's representative on the Kitimat-Stikine regional district doesn't want that to happen. Ted Ramsey joins us by phone this morning.

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The Simushir leaves Prince Rupert today

Last week, the cargo ship was caught powerless in rough seas off the coast of Haida Gwaii.

Today, the Prince Rupert Port Authority tells us what went into its repairs and where it's going now.

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"If the terrorists get to write the laws for you, then they truly have won" Northern B.C. MPs reflect on Ottawa shooting

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Ottawa police officers move flowers to an area in front of the National War Memorial, near Parliament Hill, where Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, 24, was killed by a gunman on Oct. 22. (Justin Tang/Canadian Press).

A Canadian soldier is dead after a shooting in Ottawa Wednesday morning. Corporal Nathan Cirillo - a 24-year-old reservist from Hamilton - was serving as an honour guard at the National War Memorial. Suspected gunman Micheal Zehaf Bibeau was killed by security shortly later. However, parts of Ottawa remained in lock down for hours afterwards, and MPs in the Conservative caucus were not able to leave Parliament Hill until after 8 o clock eastern time. Dick Harris is the Conservative MP for Cariboo-Prince George. He wasn't there during the shootings, but says he feels the country has been deeply affected.



NDP MP Skeena-Bulkley Valley MP Nathan Cullen was on the Hill. He says the mood in Ottawa is sombre, yet resolved, and that Canadians must not let the actions of one man erode personal freedoms.
Conservative MP for Prince George - Peace River Bob Zimmer was also in lockdown following the shooting, and was among the first to Tweet that the gunman had been killed. He, too, says Canada faces a balancing act of personal freedom and protection.

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Watch: Public Forum on Liquefied Natural Gas in Prince Rupert

A forum hosted by CBC Radio discussing the future of Liquefied Natural Gas in B.C.'s northwest moderated by Carolina de Ryk. Speakers include (from right to left on your screen): 

  • Jennifer Rice, MLA for the North Coast 
  • Don Krusel, Prince Rupert Port President and CEO
  • Barb Faggeter, Oceanographer
  • Bruce Watkinson, Gitxaala First Nation Environmental Monitoring
  • Herb Pond, Community Relations Advisor with BG LNG Group

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Simushir, fuel-laden Russian cargo ship, adrift off Haida Gwaii

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Masset Mayor Andrew Merilees has concerns about what #Simushir means for #HaidaGwaii

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A 135-metre cargo ship laden with hundreds of tonnes of bunker and diesel fuel is adrift without power off the west coast of Haida Gwaii, and the Haida Nation fears the vessel will run aground tonight.

The Russian bulk carrier vessel Simushir is at the whim of wind and waves about 25 kilometres off Moresby Island's Tasu Sound, according to the Canadian Forces' Joint Rescue Co-ordination Centre in Victoria.

CBC meteorologist Johanna Wagstaffe said storm warnings remain in effect for the area and the wind, which had been gusting from the southwest, will be changing direction.The Canadian Coast Guard reported that the ship was incapacitated in gale force winds at around 1:30 a.m. PT Friday. Officials said later that afternoon that efforts were underway to get the ship's engine running again, but winds could push the vessel closer to land before that happens.

"Over the next few hours, they'll be shifting, coming in straight from the west, meaning pushing against the ship, pushing it towards to east," she said Friday afternoon. "Really, the next 12 hours will be critical with the changing weather conditions."

Friday night weather forecast for Haida Gwaii

Winds from the west are expected Friday night in the area of the stranded ship, represented by the orange spot in this precipitation forecast image. (CBC)

B.C. Environment Minister Mary Polaksaid her ministry received news of the situation at around 6 a.m. Friday, and that preparations are being made in the event that the ship runs aground.

"The province is also contacting its partners in the B.C. Pacific States Oil Spill Task Force both to notify them of the risk and to ask them to provide mutual aid as needed based on the outcome of efforts to restore power to the vessel," a statement from her ministry said.

Acting Canadian Sub. Lt. Ron MacDougall said the Simushir is carrying "a range of hydrocarbons, mining materials and other related chemicals," which includes 400 tons of bunker oil and 50 tons of diesel.

Ship's captain injured

Eleven people are on board and a helicopter was dispatched to remove the ship's captain, who is injured, MacDougall said.

The coast guard ship Gordon Reid is en route and is roughly 750 kilometres away. 

A U.S. tugboat company, Foss Marine Ltd., dispatched the tug Barbara Foss from Prince Rupert early Friday with plans to tow the stricken vessel back to Prince Rupert. Officials said it wouldn't arrive until Saturday morning at the earliest.

The U.S. Coast Guard also dispatched a helicopter to Sandspit, on the main island of Haida Gwaii.

Haida Nation alarmed

The Council of the Haida Nation has issued an emergency alert in case the ship makes landfall.

'We're scared. We're scared about what this could mean. It's the worst scenario possible.'- Council of the Haida Nation president Peter Lantin

Rescue officials say the ship is drifting parallel to the coast so there is no imminent threat of it running around, but the Haida Nation is calling the situation dire, saying the ship could hit the B.C. coast before help arrives.

CHN President [kil tlaast'gaa] Peter Lantin said it's their worst fear coming true and casts doubt on the Northern Gateway pipeline project's promises of world class oil tanker safety.

"There's nothing world class about it. The fact that 20 hours is the earliest estimated time of arrival for anybody just reinforces what we have been saying all along," Lantin said in a Skype interview from Haida Gwaii.

"The systems in place are not adequate, and it's a joke. It's a joke to think they could ramp up the amount of tankers through our territory and convince us that there's world class systems in place to respond. We're scared. We're scared about what this could mean. It's the worst scenario possible." 

The Simushir was en route from Everett, Wash., to Russia when it lost power.

With files from The Canadian Press and the Associated Press

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On the Ledge: legislative reporters get talking about Energy in B.C., Site C and BC Hydro

Globe and Mail reporter Justine Hunter and Colonist columnist Les Leyne join Daybreak North Host Russell Bowers this week after the province rubber stamped the environmental assessment for Site C.

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Group of Seven artist's portrait of a Tsimshian chief finds its way home after almost 90 years

A print of the black and white portrait of Kitselas hereditary chief Samuel Wallace hangs in the Kitselas Treaty Office. A single red accent was painted onto the drawing of his headdress in 1926. The drawing was done by Group of Seven artist Edwin Holgate.

Cyril Bennett-Nabess, a recent art school grad from Northwest Community College had no idea the drawing existed until recently. Now, it's a reminder in his office of his history--and we get the story of the drawing, Chief Samuel Wallace and how the Kitselas Treaty Office came to find out about the portrait.