Monday Mailbag: Spelling

speling pic.jpgLots of feedback on our segment with Anne Trubek, who sees merit in improper or unconventional spelling. 

Below are a few of the comments but we'd love to see more. Just click "Read More" to get to them.

And then let us know your take on the evolution - or devolution - of spelling.

E-mail us, Facebook or tweet us your thoughts.  You can even comment directly on the interview file itself thanks to SoundCloud.  Check it out here.


 
speling pic.jpgLots of feedback on our segment with Anne Trubek, who sees merit in improper or unconventional spelling. 

Below are a few of the comments but we'd love to see more. Just click "Read More" to get to them.

And then let us know your take on the evolution - or devolution - of spelling.C

"Creative spelling might be OK when your text is 140 characters or less
in length. However, every competent reader alive gets through 50 or 60 pages of a
book per reading hour by instantly recognizing words. Words that are consistently spelled.  What would happen to our enjoyment of a book or long-form article if we were reduced to examining every syllable of a word to see if we could match it with the concept stored in our mental database? I'm all for simplifying English spelling, but keep the spelling consistent, please!"
- Alan Roberts, North Vancouver, BC
 
 
"I think your guest is just too lazy to check her spelling. It is way too easy in this "age of communication" for her to use that as an excuse. When I read something I would like to be able to understand it perfectly, and not have to rely on guesses. Can you imagine a legal document with hieroglyphics and typing shortcuts in it? or a parliamentary law created with such childish nonsense? Is she seriously expecting people to be able to decipher alpha-numeric, alpha-punctuation or alpha-emoticon 'swaps' ?
I think she is way off base. And that is MY input."
- Carol Hama
 
 
"Personally, I connect decent spelling with reading. Ms. Trubek points out that spelling is linked to publishing, but she doesn't mention its correlation with literacy. There seems to be some correlation between spelling and literacy; if a person is reading books, they usually know how to spell things fairly well, because books are supposed to be published using correct spelling. I suppose if people start writing novels in spelling in texting style, there could be a revolution... but until then, I don't think the next printing of the Dickens classic is going to be Gr8 Xpektashuns :P"
- Aaron Andrew Hunt

 
"We have goose and geese but not moose and meese.  I love that about English, it has character, a working language that is not afraid to flaunt its heritage by keeping its quirks.  It has Hindi loan words, Norse, Aboriginal, etc.  Like Cantonese compared to Mandarin, English may not be as refined as French but it is certainly just as colourful.

"So let English continue to evolve but don't change it for change sake, laziness, or place a straight jacket on it with artificial rules.  Oh, let the grade A spellers guard the arcane rules, we need those too to guard modern English's starting point."
- Glen Perry

 
"Language and spelling are instruments of rule -- and always have been. My anxiety about embracing this "moment of transition" is that we are also living through a period when all the methodologies and instrumentalities of propaganda -- perfected during the 20th-Century -- are being deployed against citizens all the time and from every direction on the compass. I think Anne Trubek's project makes a slippery slope even steeper.

"Language is a living thing, and constantly evolving, but it's also an instrument of ruling and domination and we need to be aware of that. Time to return to Orwell."
- Craig Jones, Kingston, ON
 

"I agree that english spelling is always in flux. It is a polyglot language to begin with and as spoken will be a major factor in spelling convention. That said, your contributor's thesis that we would be well served to let go of all the rules comes across as nothing more than a defense of intellectual sloth and a rather sad celebration of the kind of apathy that sustains the slacker fad in movie comedy. Too bad to waste time on this when language and english in particular is a potentially fascinating topic. I hope the kids weren't listening."
- Sandy Crawley, Etobicoke, ON

 
 
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