CBCnews

Toy cars, robots, music boxes recalled for unsafe lead levels

About 405,700 more toys have been recalled from the U.S. marketplace because they contain high levels of lead.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission announced the recall of toy cars, robots, music boxes and wagons Wednesday evening. The federal agency is continuing to test toys for safety violations, commission spokeswoman Julie Vallese said.

The recall affects the following products, all imported from China:


  • About 2,600 Robot 2000 collectible tin robots imported by Schylling Associates and sold in U.S. stores from October 2006 through September 2007 for about $25 US.
  • About 1,300 Dizzy Ducks music box toys imported by Schylling Associates and sold in U.S. stores from March 2007 through October 2007 for about $12 US.
  • About 3,600 Winnie-the-Pooh spinning toys imported by Schylling Associates and sold in U.S. stores from April 2003 through November 2003 for about $12 US.
  • About 3,500 Duck Family wind-up toys imported by Schylling Associates and sold in U.S. stores from January 2007 through August 2007 for about $8 US.
  • About 380,000 Pull-Back Action toy cars imported by Dollar General Merchandising and sold in U.S. Dollar General stores from April 2007 through October 2007 for about $1 US.
  • About 7,500 Dragster and Funny Car toys imported by International Sourcing and sold at National Hot Rod Association events and Matco Tools from March 2007 through September 2007.
  • About 7,200 Big Red wagons imported by Northern Tool & Equipment and sold through the company's catalogue, website and U.S. stores from July 2007 through September 2007 for about $60 US.

High amounts of lead can harm the kidneys and other major organs. Anemia, a decline in red blood cells, can occur, as well as damage to the nervous system that may impair mental function. Lead poisoning can also cause seizures or death.

No adverse health effects associated with any of the products have been reported.

In recent months, U.S. and Canadian officials have issued a series of recalls of made-in-China toys for safety problems involving lead levels.

U.S. CPSC recalls