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More China-made products pulled from U.S. shelves

Hundreds of thousands of toys and products were recalled Thursday for unsafe lead levels, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said.

The recall involves the following products:


  • 150,000 bookmarks and journals manufactured by Antioch Publishing and sold in U.S. stores between March 2005 and October 2007 for between $4 and $14 US.
  • 192,000 metal key chains engraved with "wisdom," "truth," "believe," "love," "hope," or "dream," sold through Dollar General stores in the U.S. from June 2005 through August 2007 for about $1 US.
  • 15,000 "Totally Me" children's decorating sets sold through Toys "R" Us in U.S. stores and online from May 2007 through September 2007 for about $10 US.
  • 63,000 Frankenstein tumblers sold at Dollar General stores in the U.S. in September 2007 for about $1.
  • 79,000 Eveready Pirates of the Caribbean medallion flashlights sold in stores in Canada and the U.S. and online from September 2006 through October 2007 for between $4 and $6 US.
  • 35,000 Baby Einstein Discover & Play Colour Blocks, models 30726 and 30881 with the date codes GE7, GF7 and GG7 sold in U.S. stores from June 2007 through September 2007 for between $10 and $13 US.
  • 10,000 Wooden Pull-Along Alphabet & Math Block Wagons , Pull-Along Learning Blocks Wagons, 10-in-1 Activity Learning Carts, Flip-Flop Alphabet Blocks sold in KB stores in the U.S., sold from August 2005 and September 2007.

All of the recalled products were made in China.

Health Canada spokeswoman Joey Rathwell confirmed the decorating sets, Baby Einstein blocks and KB wooden toys were not sold in Canada.

High amounts of lead can harm the nervous system, kidneys and other major organs. Anemia, a decline in red blood cells, can occur, as well as damage to the nervous system that may impair mental function. At worst, lead poisoning can cause seizures or death.

The recalls follow a series of recalls and product safety investigations relating to Chinese imports, including products ranging from pet food to toothpaste and children's toys.

Recall advisories