CBC British Columbia

Your Questions - British Columbia

Share your thoughts and read what others have to say

Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Ian Hanomansing on the Olympic experience

top-hanomansing.jpg
CBC News Vancouver's Ian Hanomansing. (CBC)
As Vancouver gets ready for the 2010 Olympics, are you wondering what the Games will be like?


Ian Hanomansing, co-anchor of CBC News Vancouver, has covered the past three Winter Olympics for CBC Television.

He was in Turin in 2006, Salt Lake City in 2002, and Nagano in 1998.

This is your chance to ask Ian about the Olympic experience.

Submit your question using the form below, and click here to read Ian's answers.

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Comments: (5)

Jill (Vancouver) wrote:

In Vancouver we have seen escalating protests around housing and other social justice issues. Many of these have been tied to the Olympics. What has been your experience in other Olympic cities? Have you seen or heard of these issues elsewhere? If so, why are they so marginally covered in the press?

Posted October 17, 2007 10:00 PM

jen (victoria) wrote:

Ian:
If media coverage is the only real experience that most British Columbians and Canadians will have of the Olympics, to what extent do you think this programming motivates public support for funding the games that they cannot afford to experience otherwise?
Thanks!

Posted October 15, 2007 04:51 PM

Melissa (KelownaBC) wrote:

Q| The prices for the Olympic Events was recently released to the Public....We have given up a lot to have the games here ... certainly the pricing for Canadian or even B.C. residents can be discounted especially since our tax dollars are flipping a good portion of the bill to Host the 2010 Olympics. Is there any further discussion to be had about the pricing of the Olympic Events?

A|You are the person who can answer the question about further discussion.

I'm sure the Vancouver Olympic committee considers the matter closed and they'll put the tickets up for sale next year as planned. But you have to decide whether there is any further discussion to be had.

There was a little controversy in Vancouver when the NHL season this month over the price of tickets. Of course, the Canucks are a private business and you can choose whether you want to buy their tickets or not. But, as you mention in your question, we - the people of British Columbia and the rest of Canada- have been paying a lot of money for these games through our tax dollars. Wouldn't that entitle you to "further" the discussion?

Posted October 14, 2007 03:51 AM

squib (vancouver) wrote:

Q| When will we see a return to the roots of the ancient olympics, where the games provided a common event for the broader population? We could stop our wars to play the games. Why have they dropped so significantly from the ancient to the modern games in our estimation?
A| I wonder if they have, in fact, "dropped...in our estimation"?


Certainly there is much to debate about the Olympics and, indeed, we have been having that vigorous debate in Vancouver. Is the cost justifiable? Should professionals be competing for medals? Do doping controversies cast a shadow over all of the events?

And yet, the Olympics remain the gold standard when it comes to public attention. There is something about the Olympics that drives a lot of people to their televisions every four years to cheer on people who, for the three years and 350 days in between, they don't think twice about.

Now, I know there are exceptions. Still, how many of the millions of Canadians who shouted in celebration when Cindy Klassen won medal after medal in Turin have any idea how she fared on the World Cup circuit in 2007?

For all of the attention the men's 100 metres gets at each summer Olympics, how many people know who the "world's fastest man" is right now?

For all the debate, for all its flaws, there is something about the Olympics that stirs our passions. And perhaps the critics of the Games will be comforted by this: almost to a person, the Olympians I have met have been remarkably humble and gracious. Perhaps that shouldn't be surprising. It takes a special kind of person to train for hours, every day, for years, to represent their country for a day...or even a few seconds. And then, start all over again.

Posted October 12, 2007 01:59 PM

Dave Sygrasha (Vancouver) wrote:

Q| Did you ever get out of the security bubble, and try to enter the games as a 'civilian'? Does the press ever get a layman's view of the games?

A| As a reporter covering the Games I spent about half of my time outside that "bubble" and a couple of things come to mind for people here in Vancouver to consider.


First of all, whether you're attending an event or just spending time in the city, expect huge disruptions. In all of the Olympic cities I was in there was confusion over traffic flow changes, closed sidewalks, downtown hotel lobbies that were no longer open to the public and security. Lots and lots of security, with some of the rules changing from day to day or even hour to hour.

Second, the Olympic "spirit" seemed to build in the days after the opening ceremonies. I would arrive in the host city about a week before the Games began and in each city, there were stories in the local papers about how many people seemed disinterested in the games. But by the end of the first week of events that seemed to change, with a surge of support.

Of course, this kind of assessment is completely subjective...maybe I was just getting over my jetlag. But there is no question that having athletes from the host country win gold infused the city with energy. That was certainly the case in Nagano when the Japanese ski jumpers started doing very well and in Salt Lake, when the US team climbed atop the medal standings.

Another factor in creating excitement was having places where the public could visit and feel a connection to the Olympics without having to pay or line up or go through security. In Salt Lake City, there was a public plaza with booths and displays and, yes, over-priced souvenirs, where people could visit, stroll or just hang out and feel like they were in an Olympic city.

Posted October 12, 2007 11:15 AM

World »

Analysis As McCain fights brain cancer, Republicans will vote without their 'consummate dealmaker'
A devastating diagnosis that might indefinitely sideline a key Republican legislator is throwing into doubt U.S. President Donald Trump’s plans to advance his agenda.
Even after Trump warning, Mueller likely to probe president's finances: reports
U.S. President Donald Trump's growing anxiety about the federal Russia probe has spilled into public view with his warning in a New York Times interview earlier this week that special counsel Robert Mueller would be out of bounds if he dug into the Trump family's finances. But that's a line that Mueller seems sure to cross.
Israel limits Muslim access to Jerusalem site amid tensions
Israel banned Muslim men under the age of 50 from a contested Jerusalem shrine on Friday, ahead of expected protests over the installation of metal detectors there.
more »

Canada »

'Get out there, get 'er done and, of course, be safe': Tiny Riske Creek, B.C., fights the fire video
In the tiny B.C. community of Riske Creek, logging and ranching are a way of life, but in recent days many of the 90 or so residents have found themselves on the front line of one of the largest fires in the province.
Youth gets adult sentence of 6 years for attack that left Jackie Healey blind in her left eye
The youth who assaulted staff members at the Selkirk Behavioural Health Foundation has received an adult sentence for the “stark horror” of the attack and because he is a danger to the public, the judge said.
Sunshine Village to close, serve as staging area for crews to battle Verdant Creek wildfire
Sunshine Village ski resort in Banff is being closed to the public to allow crews to use the area as a staging ground to fight an out-of-control wildfire burning just across the continental divide in British Columbia.
more »

Politics »

New Many Indigenous families not applying for Canada child benefit: documents
Many Indigenous families on reserves and in the North have not been applying for the Canada child benefit because they are either unaware of the program or they are not filing their income taxes — a requirement for eligibility.
New Khadr's war crimes appeal could hinge on bin Laden propagandist's case
As the wrongful death case against Omar Khadr winds its way through the Ontario courts, his legal battle in the U.S. to quash his war crime convictions remains on hold, pending the outcome of a case involving a former propagandist for Osama bin Laden.
Scheer says anti-Khadr campaign in U.S. media is fair game as NDP cry hypocrisy video
Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer brushed off suggestions that his party's campaign denouncing the Trudeau government's apology and payout to Omar Khadr in the U.S. media will negatively impact upcoming NAFTA negotiations.
more »

Health »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Arts & Entertainment»

Justin Bieber can't tour China because of 'bad behaviour'
It is not appropriate for Canadian pop star Justin Bieber to visit China because of his bad behaviour and he needed to improve his conduct to become a singer "truly loved" by the public, a Chinese state office has said.
Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington dead at 41
Chester Bennington, lead singer of the California rock band Linkin Park, has died at the age of 41.
'Sounds stupid as hell:' HBO's Confederate, by Game of Thrones showrunners, earns early scorn
HBO has attracted harsh criticism for its newly announced series helmed by the creators of Game of Thrones.
more »

Technology & Science »

Paying poor landowners not to cut trees a cheap way to save forests
Deforestation dropped by more than half in Ugandan villages where land owners were paid about $28 per hectare each year if they preserved their trees, according to the study from U.S. researchers published in the journal Science.
Elon Musk speaks about Hyperloop, Mars mission
Elon Musk announced Thursday afternoon that he'd received verbal approval for a Hyperloop from New York City to Washington, D.C. A day earlier, Musk revealed that he hasn't given up on his Mars dreams but that his Falcon Heavy and Crew Dragon plans have met some unforeseen obstacles.
Fear of predation may be enough to push small groups of animals to extinction
Fear of predation may play a role in pushing small populations of vulnerable species to extinction, a new Canadian study has found.
more »

Money »

FIFTH ESTATE Judicial watchdog finds no problem with judges attending sponsored cocktail parties
The Canadian Judicial Council has dismissed complaints against federal judges who attended sponsored cocktail events at an international tax conference in Europe.
Canadian travel to U.S. drops, while overseas visits to Canada surge to highest May ever
Canadians are making fewer trips to the United States, and foreign appetite for travel in Canada has hit its highest May on record.
Rogers Q2 net income rises 35%, beats analyst estimate
Rogers Communications reported a 35 per cent increase in second-quarter net income on Thursday, beating analyst estimates with an especially strong performance from its key wireless division.
more »

Consumer Life »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Sports »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
O.J. Simpson granted parole in Nevada robbery video
O.J. Simpson was granted parole Thursday after more than eight years in prison for a Las Vegas hotel heist.
Video O.J. Simpson granted parole video
Former football star O.J. Simpson was granted parole after more than eight years in prison for a Las Vegas hotel heist
Live Blog Follow the action of the North American Indigenous Games
Join CBC Sports' coverage of the 2017 North American Indigenous Games, featuring Twitter and video posts from CBC's team of reporters, plus all of the live streaming action from the events themselves.
more »

Diversions »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
more »