CBC Literary Prizes

Becky Blake wins the 2017 CBC Nonfiction Prize

Blake will receive $6,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts and a 10-day writing residency at the Banff Centre. Her story will be published in Air Canada enRoute magazine and on CBC Books.
Becky Blake was the winner of the 2013 CBC Short Story Prize. (Ayelet Tsabari)

Becky Blake has won the 2017 CBC Nonfiction Prize for "Trust Exercise," a story about the author's first love.

"Trust Exercise" was selected out of more than 1400 submissions. A team of readers selected the longlist, then the prize jury selected the shortlist and eventual winner. This year's jury was comprised of Carmen Aguirre, Dave Bidini and Charlotte Gray

"'Trust Exercise' is an elegant reminder not only of the malleability of memory, but also of its interruptions," wrote the jury in a statement. "The writing here breathes like a series of long sighs, and there's a quiet to the prose the way a flame set to parchment is muted yet alive. The devil is in the details, sure, but this wry story of love glides and swoops, too."

Blake receives $6,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts and will have her story published in Air Canada enRoute magazine and on CBC Books. She will also have the opportunity to attend a 10-day writing residency at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity.

The other finalists for the 2017 prize were Sarah Bennett for "Caught," Alisha Mascarenhas for "Diving," Gail Nardi for "The Guardian" and Carla Powell for "The Road to Machu Picchu Starts at 385 lbs." The finalists each received $1,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts and had their stories published on CBC Books.

This is not the first time Blake has won a CBC Literary Prize. She won the 2013 CBC Short Story Prize for "The Three Times Rule."

Sarah Walou won the Radio-Canada French-language grand prize, Prix du récit, for her story "Deux Villages."

If you're interested in submitting to the CBC Literary Prizes, the 2018 CBC Short Story Prize is accepting submissions until Oct, 31, 2017.

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