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CBC Literary Prize alumni set to dazzle us again

This fall several past winners and finalists of the CBC Literary Prizes will publish new projects. And we can’t wait to get our hands on them. 

One of the great benefits of winning or being nominated for one of the three Prizes is exposing your work to many new readers - including publishers (for a complete list of benefits, check out our "7 Things winning a CBC Literary Prize can do for your writing career”).

Here are some writers who have made the leap from submitting an unpublished work to the competition to presenting a new release this fall.

 


Sadiqa de Meijer
captured the CBC Poetry Prize last year with her series, “Great Aunt Unmarried.” Her debut poetry collection takes us from Frisian living rooms to the sidewalks of Toronto’s Little India. Sadiqa de Meijer includes her CBC Poetry Prize creations in Leaving Howe Island (Oolichan Books), her debut collection out October 1st.



Catherine Greenwood
may not have won last year’s Grand Prize, but her shortlisted poem “The Texada Queen” was strong enough to be chosen to wrap up her latest collection, The Lost Letters (Brick Books), a delicate journey of requited love that moves from the twelfth century to the twenty-first on shelves now.



Shelagh Plunkett
is an award winning writer and journalist.  Plunkett won the CBC Creative Nonfiction Prize in 2007 for “In a Garden,” her coming-of-age tale about growing up in Georgetown, Guyana. She’s been reworking this short story since, transforming it into a lush novel-length memoir, The Water Here is Never Blue, out now from Penguin Canada.



A Creative Nonfiction finalist in 2012, Cornelia Hoogland has also re-worked her short personal piece into a longer form. She re-imagined her story “Sea Level” as a long poem. It will appear in a poetry chapbook of the same name, out this November from Baseline.


FROM WORDS TO MUSIC
 
 
There is new music on the horizon as well as new books. Brendan McLeod, a finalist for Creative Nonfiction in 2012 for “Psychosomatic,” is a writer and also a musician and songwriter with the Vancouver-based indie folk collective The Fugitives. The Fugitives have a new LP out this fall called “Everything Will Happen” (Light Organ Records).


Asa Boxer
is another alumnus who is seeing his words set to music. Asa won the Poetry Prize in 2004 for his poem “The Workshop.” This fall, composer Peter Skoggard will set 15 of Boxer’s poems to music for a project called The Tree of Inspiration. And there’s more. Asa Boxer has a new chapbook of poems out too - Friar Biard's Primer to the New World (Frog Hollow Press), which features original illustrations by James Hillis.



Finally, Claire Battershill, who was one of our youngest winners when she won the CBC Short Story Prize in 2008, has just signed a book deal with McClelland & Stewart.  Battershill will present her debut collection of stories, Circus, including her award-winning story of the same name, in early 2014. 
 





Congratulations to these talented writers on their new endeavours!


And send YOUR story to the CBC Short Story Prize. The deadline is November 1, 2013.



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