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Giles Blunt: Write first, research later

To this IMPAC-longlisted crime writer, research can be the procrastinator's best friend.
 
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How much research should you do for a novel? As little as possible and as much as necessary. Research is a foolproof way to feel like a writer without actually writing anything. It can give you a spurious sense of importance, as if scribbling down a fact somehow lends weight to your literary efforts. Far too many would-be authors spend years 'organizing their materials,' instead of writing something. Far better to finish a draft, then ask your questions, which will be much more focused. And keep in mind, no one will be impressed with your ability to use Google."

Giles Blunt grew up in North Bay, Ontario, a small city similar to the Algonquin Bay of the John Cardinal novels. The first Cardinal novel, Forty Words for Sorrow, won the British Crime Writers Silver Dagger award, and the second, The Delicate Storm, won the Crime Writers of Canada Arthur Ellis award for best novel. He has been twice longlisted for the Dublin IMPAC award. His latest novel is Until The Night.

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