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Chantal Kreviazuk on Canada's part to play in the world

One of her arguments as to why the book should win Canada Reads this year has been that she believes The Right to be Cold explores a critical global issue from a distinctly Canadian perspective.
Singer-songwriter Chantal Kreviazuk argues that Sheila Watt-Cloutier's memoir The Right to Be Cold challenges Canadians to think about who they want to be in the fight against climate change. 1:37

Singer-songwriter Chantal Kreviazuk has been ardently defending The Right to be Cold by Sheila Watt-Cloutier during show week. One of her arguments as to why the book should win Canada Reads is that she believes The Right to Be Cold explores a critical global issue from a distinctly Canadian perspective.

"What [Sheila] did was she reminded me who I was as a Canadian. She let me know, 'Okay, you Canadian people, you have a very specific trait … to the soul of this world. And what can it be right now?' And I thought, 'Wow, that's brilliant — that you reflected that at me right now that I am reading this book,'" Kreviazuk said. 

"And you remind me in this book that Canada is 43 per cent Arctic, has the most Arctic, and we have a responsibility to do something. How is the Arctic polluted, when the Arctic itself doesn't emit any pollution? What's up with that?"

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