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Canada Reads: True Stories Polls


Carol Off is the host of As It Happens on CBC Radio One. She's also an award-winning journalist and accomplished author. In addition to penning several books about the Canadian military, Carol wrote Bitter Chocolate in 2006, an exposé of the corruption in the cocoa industry.

Which of Carol Off's picks would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


We turned to several people who are in the know when it comes to books in translation for their Canada Reads choices.

Which of these picks would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


We called on former Canada Reads panelists and authors to play with our new theme and recommend their favourite true story.

Which of these picks would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


Ronald Wright is an award-winning author, adept at both fiction and non-fiction. His 1997 novel, A Scientific Romance, was chosen as a book of the year by the Globe and Mail, the Sunday Times and the New York Times. He is also a frequent contributor to the Times Literary Supplement, and was the 2004 Massey Lecturer.

Which of Roy MacGregor's picks would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


Roy may be familiar to most Canadians for his long-running column in the Globe and Mail, but he's also written more than 40 books, including 23 in his internationally popular Screech Owl series for young readers.

Which of Roy MacGregor's picks would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


We asked seven groups or individuals who are in the know in publishing -- agents, publishing houses, sales reps and more -- for their dream Canada Reads: True Stories book list.

Which of these experts' choices would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


John Doyle is the television critic for the Globe & Mail and an accomplished non-fiction author in his own right. His 2005 memoir, A Great Feast of Light: Growing Up Irish in the Television Age, was a Globe & Mail Top 100 Book of 2005. His latest, 2010's The World Is a Ball: The Joy, Madness, and Meaning of Soccer, explores another of Doyle's passions, soccer.

Which of John Doyle's picks would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


Witold Rybczynski is a Canadian-American architect and author. After 20 years spent teaching at McGill University, he now lives in Philadelphia and is the Martin and Margy Meyerson Professor of Urbanism at the University of Pennsylvania.

Which of Witold's picks would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


The Charles Taylor Prize, inaugurated in 2000, honours the best in Canadian literary non-fiction. Originally awarded every two years, this prestigious honour became an annual event in 2004. Winners of the award receive $25,000 and each finalist is awarded $2,000. The award is named after renowned journalist Charles P.B. Taylor. Taylor's wife Noreen created the award in his honour, after his death in 1997.

Which of these past finalists would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


Roy may be familiar to most Canadians for his long-running column in the Globe and Mail, but he's also written more than 40 books, including 23 in his internationally popular Screech Owl series for young readers.

Which of Roy MacGregor's choices would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


We asked five great Canadian bookstores to submit their dream Canada Reads: True Stories picks.

Which of these choices would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


Elizabeth May is the pithy and well-read leader of the Green Party of Canada. The autyhor of seven non-fiction reads, her most recent book, Losing Confidence: Power, Politics And the Crisis In Canadian Democracy, was published by McClleland & Stewart in 2009.

Which of Elizabeth's picks would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


Brian Goldman is an ER doctor and the host of White Coat, Black Art, CBC Radio One's show about the culture of health care. His first book, The Night Shift: Real Life in the Heart of the ER, was published by HarperCollins earlier this month.

Which of Dr. Brian's picks would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


In 2005, the British Columbia Achievement Foundation launched a new award, British Columbia's National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction, to celebrate the best in non-fiction from coast to coast to coast. This $40,000 prize is awarded annually, and esteemed writers such as John Vaillant, Ian Brown, Lorna Goodison and Noah Richler have taken home top honours in its short history.

Which past nominees would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


Heather Mallick is a weekly columnist for the Toronto Star, a monthly columnist for The Guardian and an author and lecturer. We asked Heather for her Canada Reads: True Stories picks.

Which of Heather's picks would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


We asked four great Canadian book bloggers to submit their dream Canada Reads: True Stories picks.

Which of these choices would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote now.


The Writers' Trust of Canada launched its literary awards in 1997, with a fiction and non-fiction prize. While Rogers has sponsored the fiction prize for its entire 14 years, the non-fiction prize has had several different sponsors. In 2011, the prize brought on a new sponsor and was relaunched as the Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction, upping the winner's purse to $60,000.

Which past nominees would you like to see in the ring? Cast your vote for your pick from each years' nominees!

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