Reader recommendation round-up: October 18

Here's today's round-up of great recommendations from readers across Canada.

British Columbia and Yukon

y.jpg

Liza recommends: Y by Marjorie Celona

"The best books are often ones where the family you love isn't necessary the family you were born to. Shannon, despite her wild, unpredictable upbringing finds an unconventional circle of support and love. Celona's writing is incredible."





dogs.jpg

Anne recommends: Dogs at the Perimeter by Madeleine Thien

"I found this book very moving. It represents a new generation of Canadian writers whose families were recent refugees to Canada, writing about that past and and how it has shaped their lives since."





Prairies and North:

swallow.jpg

Carol recommends: Swallow by Theanna Bischoff

"A very compelling, believable, multi-layered and engaging story. Early reviews have been excellent. The author, only 28 years old, was born in Calgary and currently lives in Calgary but lived in Toronto for four years. The novel setting features both cities. The author's first novel, Cleavage was nominated for a Commonwealth Award and a ReLit award."




garneau.jpg

Brenda recommends: The Garneau Block by Todd Babiak

"It speaks of a very unique Edmonton identity that defies the Alberta redneck stereotype. It also underscores life in an otherwise idyllic neighbourhood full of colourful personalities with a lot of heart. And finally, it speaks to a unique character that exemplifies what it means to be Canadian."




Ontario:

stowaway.jpg

Adrian recommends: The Stowaway by Robert Hough

"I hope that Hough's success with Dr. Brinkley's Tower will encourage readers to visit his earlier works. The Stowaway is a compelling and suspenseful tale of desperate men who attempt to make their way to America on the Maersk Dubai and the ship's crew who are compelled to act on the knowledge that discovery of the illegal passengers will mean their sure death."




leaven.jpg

Paula recommends: Leaven of Malice by Robertson Davies

"While Davies is better known for "serious" novels like Fifth Business or What's Bred in the Bone, not nearly enough Canadians know his earlier works, the comic Salterton Trilogy. I believe Leaven of Malice is the funniest Canadian book of all time - written in the tradition of Trollope or Thackery. At the time, of course, Davies was writing about the real world around him - now, 48 years after it was first published, it's a cultural artifact, a chance to time-travel to a very different Canada, one that's bred in our bone."



Quebec:

felicia.jpg

Florentina recommends: The Darling of Kandahar by Felicia Mihali

"A lucid and sensitive portrayal of war, skillfully interwoven in a fine tapestry of miniature history accounts, reflections on immigration and cultural diversity, mass media analysis, and love story plot."





greenplace.jpg

Judy recommends: A Green Place for Dying by R.J. Harlick

"A Green Place for Dying by R. J. Harlick is a mystery novel that I would like to nominate for Canada Reads 2013. I was able to identify with the main character as she struggles with her own insecurities while living her life in a remote area in Quebec with a First Nations Reserve as her closest neighbour. I lived a similar life style in my youth. The culture and customs of the First Nations people and the ongoing struggles of following their ancient teachings while dealing with modern day culture were well presented and are important to the storyline. I was drawn into the story and found that I was unable to put the book down once I started reading it."


Atlantic provinces:

underthisunbrokensky.jpg

Nicole recommends: Under This Unbroken Sky by Shandi Mitchell

"Shandi Mitchell's debut novel is so gripping that you will miss your bus stop if you're not careful. You will also wonder about the characters long after you have finished reading the final page."





townforgot.jpg

Patrick recommends: The Town that Forgot How to Breathe by Kenneth Harvey

"Kenneth Harvey is one of the overlooked great writers in Canada. His novels are great, thought-provoking page turners. He deserves to be in the spotlight this year."






Haven't submitted your recommendations yet? You can do so here! But hurry, time is running out: the recommendation period closes on Monday, October 22 at 11:59 p.m. ET.






Check out past recommendation round-ups:

Comments are closed.