The 2016 Shakespeare Selfie writing challenge for students is now closed

Over 500 students from across the country took part in the 2016 Shakespeare Selfie challenge. 

The grand prize winners of the 2016 Shakespeare Selfie challenge are Katherine Latosinsky in the Grades 7-9 category and Lauren Chang in the Grades 10-12 category. Congratulations, Katherine and Lauren!

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Shakespeare took selfies all the time - but instead of a camera, he used a quill. And instead of calling them "selfies," they were called "soliloquies" or "monologues." When Shakespearean characters talk to themselves, or talk to the audience? That's a Shakespeare Selfie.

THE CHALLENGE
In the Shakespeare Selfie, we ask students to write a modern-day soliloquy or monologue (200-400 words) by a Shakespearean character, based on a prominent news, pop culture or current affairs event from the last year (April 2015-April 2016). 

The challenge is open to students in two age categories: Grades 7-9 and Grades 10-12.

PRIZES
There is an iPad mini for each category's grand prize winner (Grades 7-9 and 10-12).

We're also delighted to announce that the school library of each grand prize winner will receive 50 young adult books from these great Canadian publishers:

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PAST WINNERS
Learn more about the 2015 winners from the Grades 7-9 and Grades 10-12 categories, or download the PDFs of all 10 shortlisted entries from the 2015 challenge in the Grades 7-9 and Grades 10-12 categories.  


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JUDGE
Our judge for the 2016 Shakespeare Selfie writing challenge is bestselling and award-winning young adult author Kenneth Oppel. His books include the Silverwing trilogy, which has sold over a million copies around the world, and Airborn, winner of the 2004 Governor General's Award for children's literature and the Michael L. Printz Honor Book award from the American Library Association. Kenneth's latest novel is The Nest.(Plus, he's married to a Shakespeare scholar.)


RULES & REGULATIONS

SOLILOQUIES VS. MONOLOGUES: A PRIMER
Soliloquies and monologues are similar, but different. They both involve a single speaker - one character who does all the talking. But a soliloquy is when one character is talking to himself or herself - reflecting on a situation, a feeling - stating his or her thoughts out loud. A monologue is when a character talks to someone else, or a group of people.

Soliloquy example from Romeo and Juliet:


Monologue example from Julius Caesar: 



KEEP CHECKING THIS PAGE FOR UPDATES!

Any questions? Send an e-mail to us at canadawrites[at]cbc.ca.


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